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flyfishing99

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Everything posted by flyfishing99

  1. Thanks. Do you happen to know a site that shows photos of the technique on dry flies? Would appreciate it
  2. Hadn't seen it elsewhere. Where might I see others?? The reason I think it is worthwhile is because you can adjust such "made" hackle any size by just placing the deer hair "shorter" in the dubbing loop. If you are tying while on a fishing trip you don't need to take a number of sized hackle with you. I do like the comparaduns as well. Try these for variety!!!! This is a photo by Hans Weilenmann. It shows one of these first hackled with spun deer hair and then with spun cdc fibers. I dressed it sort of swept back.
  3. Hadn't seen it elsewhere. Where might I see others?? The reason I think it is worthwhile is because you can adjust such "made" hackle any size by just placing the deer hair "shorter" in the dubbing loop. If you are tying while on a fishing trip you don't need to take a number of sized hackle with you. I do like the comparaduns as well. Try these for variety!!!!
  4. Hi, I was told that I only use this forum to spam about my blogspot, but that really isn't the case. Wonder what you think of my method of spinning deer hair to form a hackle. This fly, if I get a photo up, is to imitate an emerged flav. Also trying to post a photo of it floating in a tupperware dish. Note the change in color of the dubbing once wet. Granted, the color on my pictures is not 100% due to lighting, but it is worth remembering that wet dubbing tends to "darken" when wet. Please let me know what you think. Thanks
  5. With the shape of the stem, you can move your fly in many directions for inspection/trimming as the stem rotates on the ball at the base like a floor shiftnin avcar or truck.
  6. I had both and liked the standard better. More stable. The deluxe has Knurled knob to hold the stem v a wing nut The deluxe had some adjustment or something which, on mine led to movement The other guys who responded may remember better than I. Short of the rotary function, they were very very good
  7. Hans, This is Byron Haugh. Very nice fly!
  8. Sorry, a typo. Title should read "Spammer" Hi, I have fairly recently been participating in this forum as well as flyanglers.com. I am retired now, so I have time to devote to my passion of fly fishing and fly tying. I have even started my own blog at flyfishing99.blogspot.com This morning, on my blog there was an anonymous comment which said that I was spamming sites with my crap and that I should crawl back under my rock. This ugly comment may have come because I posted the same post about the old Xuron vise being made again on both of the mentioned forums. Previously, a fellow by the name "Big E" had responded to a post of mine about a new vise I bought with a picture of a can of spam. Luckily, these two crude comments seem to be the exception to the rule and I find most folks at these two forums to be educated and civil. One of my personal "vices" is my collecting of fly tying vises. I really enjoy tying on quality vises of all types. One of my personal favorites from the past is the Xuron vise. I was excited to see that someone was still making them, so I made the same post about that on both forums hoping younger tiers could be aware of an old vise system which I think is quite unique. I often wonder what may have gone so wrong in someone's life that they revert to being a bully and try that tactic on others. One of the things that has made me love fly fishing so much is that the vast majority of fly fishers are really nice, friendly, and helpful people. It is really disappointing to find one like the one who made such a comment on my blog. Obviously, from the content of his comment he is among the otherwise nice folks who post and view on these forums. Thank you, Not anonymous (Byron Haugh) I can be reached at [email protected]
  9. Fishing for bonefish here in Hawaii is quickly growing as a sport. I live on the island of Kauai and there is some here. Most of it occurs in Oahu where the fly shop Nervous Waters is located.
  10. Thanks for the pictures!!! Real fly tying history. I had the pedestal base and the C clamp models. Still have the pedestal base one some place.
  11. There is one fly shop in the islands here. It is Nervous Waters in Honolulu. My strong suggestion would be to get a guide for your first attempt. The trade winds over here can be problematic
  12. You're a lucky guy. Did you know the Dette's???????
  13. About 15 years ago, I tracked down the owner of Xuron. This must have been before Savanah. I considered trying to buy the rights to mike them again. Guess someone else actually did it.
  14. Yes, I liked the jaw tightening mechanism. They even thought to put several places to screw in the tightening "bar" so it wouldn't get in the way You knew Darbee?!! Did he give you any of his necks??
  15. It appears that the old Xuron vise is still available. I owned one many years ago Anyone else tie on the old Xuron? The stem swiveled on the base like the old floor shifts on cars This is the web site. It was the first major improvement to fly vise design since the Thompson A http://www.stsimonsoutfitters.com/Xuron-Vise_c_17.html
  16. Hi, Couple shots of my PMD. Top picture is my upside-down paraloop; next photo is my standard traditional hackled dry pmd Perhaps can see better at my blog: flyfishing99.blogspot.com Comments appreciated. Thanks, Byron
  17. I haven't had great luck using standard PMD patterns on the Henry's Fork. Part of the reason is that there is usually a compound hatch going on. Part of the problem is that the water is so slick, the trout have the advantage. I'm preparing already for next summer's trip there. I intend to have a bunch of these in sizes 16 and 18 ready to go.
  18. It is so easy to load the thread. If you look closely, you will see there is a very short "throat" at the top. Beats sucking the thread up a long tube or using a threading device. flyfishing99.blogspot.com
  19. Anyone tie this style of dry fly? This is a view from the bottom of the fly. You tie a separate hackle around each divided wing. The result is that the hackle comes out at a 45 degree angle from the body on each side. This is more like the real insect whose legs go out to the side - not directly underneath the body. In addition, this fly will ALWAYS land upright on the water. Better photos of this and other styles on my blogsite: flyfishing99.blogspot.com Thanks for looking. Let me know what you think
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