Jump to content
Fly Tying

Capt Bob LeMay

core_group_3
  • Content Count

    2,113
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Capt Bob LeMay

  1. Capt Bob LeMay

    Cheating

    Public exposure is the best medicine in my opinion… Must say though if they’re doing this… what else are they up to? Of course I’m just a cynical old cop that will never be allowed to serve on any jury…
  2. A buddy of mine fished Flamingo yesterday... He said that other than a high water mark and some mud on the ramps you'd never know the Park had a hurricane pass by.. in that part of the Park. I'm betting it's a different story 55 miles to the northwest where Everglades City and Chokoloskee are... He reported very high water in the interior and his day was mostly snook and small tarpon... It will be a few days before I can get out there myself... Just got in a bunch of trailer suspension parts so I'll be dropping my hull off the trailer and getting after it in a day or so... When you tow a boat on the highway as much as I do most years the maintenance stuff just never ends between boat, trailer, and not to mention all of your actual fishing gear...
  3. I used to tie a tarpon fly in those same colors (blue collar, orange and yellow tail) as that Winter's Hope pattern... It was very popular among the shops I was fillling orders for a bit more than 30 years ago... That Wiinter's Hope is very nicely done... hopper
  4. I've begun to think of them all these years later as a just a bonus when you're poling along shallow shorelines looking for snook, reds, tarpon, etc. The small ones will eat a properly presented fly on sight - you'll get some excitement until it finally bites though your tippet - then tie on another fly and keep moving. Little blacktips in particular will get so fired up they'll chase a fly or lure all the way back to the boat - then race around the boat a time or two trying to figure out where that tasty looking item went.. . Bigger sharks are more than just a one time thrill since they'll really put an angler through the paces and it's fine preparation for fighting big fish later on.... Yes, you do have to go through some preparation to fish for the bigger specimens and you'll have to chum (here I always want the freshest of fresh-killed fish to hang over the side - none of this last week's frozen carcasses. And it can certainly get exciting any time a big shark is near the boat and not happy at all. For what it's worth though as long as you don't try to pull one in the boat with you - they quickly settle down and allow the guide (or your fishing partner) to do a bit of retrieving so that the fish swims away without the fly in its jaw... By the way, along coast of the 'glades many, many sharks have more than one rust mark in the corner of their jaws from rusted out hooks... Doesn't seem to bother them at all...
  5. Capt Bob LeMay

    Cheating

    I'm a retired cop (retired after 22 years and went back to school, got my captain's license, and never looked back..). It took a few years after leaving that line of work before re-learning that most aren't lying to me or doing something they shouldn't be doing. Incidents like these cheaters remind me of a world I don't want to be a part of any more. Wish it weren't so...
  6. Both of my main venues in Everglades National Park and nearby areas are open again and available to anglers and guides alike... Flamingo (the center of Everglades National Park) - but only the boat ramps, the marina store and fuel pumps are up and running... and Everglades City / Chokoloskee at the north end of the Park. In that area though - nothing else is up and running with very few exceptions... I've seen one post that mentions an email from the Everglades Rod and Gun Club saying they have a few rooms available -but no restaurant or other amenities. All of this will change from day to day as everything comes back to life - but for now I'd have everything I'd need with me when going into that area... .I have no idea whether any of the gas stations are open at all.there at all. Now if I can only finish a few home projects - I'll be on the water myself at each location and post a report for each... maybe later this week... This should be prime time in the salt and brackish portions of the Everglades...
  7. Just posted a piece on another site that might be of interest... about how we toss flies at sharks - of every size from the little ones all the way up to ones that are too big... https://forums.floridasportsman.com/discussion/294747/shark-fly#latest Although I didn't mention it.. .whenever we're working bigger sharks I try to pick places on the edges of large flats with a deep channel less than a hundred feet away - and do my best to make sure there's no downed trees or other nasty snags anywhere nearby. Once you're hooked up on a big animal you really can't control it until it begins to tire and I've lost more than one good fly line to a shark that made a hard turn around a submerged tree or other object and cut us off... Nothing in what I wrote speaks to handling sharks at the boat - that's a whole different topic. I will say that we do our best to remove the fly from any hooked shark with an 18" long de-hooker and never, repeat never, make the slightest attempt to take it out of the water.. Little ones that I can pick up with one hand are the only exception..... and even a tiny little shark is a handful. The only sharks that have ever drawn blood from me are the little ones so be warned...
  8. Capt Bob LeMay

    Cheating

    Saw just enough of that to last me forever…. The moment you place a money incentive on winning a tournament… I expect one or two will be trying to gain an advantage by cheating…. I long ago decided not to fish tournaments since in general they take something I really like -and turn it into something I don’t like at all…
  9. For folks with building skills Florida will be heaven these next two or three years… Unfortunately we’ll also draw more than our share of scam artists and other scoundrels hoping for chances to rip off anyone from a retiree to the government itself…. and make a quick buck. Emergency workers and utility workers will be on all the overtime they can stand - while every last resident in our state can expect their homeowner’s insurance to jump again (as if it weren’t high enough…). Just the price we pay for living here .
  10. Historically all of the boom times here in Florida - came to an abrupt end with terrible hurricanes.. in modern times.... The baddest of them all was the "Labor Day" hurricane in 1935 that killed hundreds and hundreds in the Keys... To this day it's still the hurricane that had the lowest pressure reading on record... This is by way of saying that as bad as Ian was... it could have been a lot worse (if you can even imagine that...). Of course we live in a well known hurricane area - but you could go years and years without a single strike - or get hit three times in one year... That brings up another small point, that hurricanes come in all sizes and situations so you can never be sure of the size of that dog coming to bite you... The one positive thing about them in the modern era is that at least we hear about them well in advance (mostly - but not always...) and can prepare for what can happen to you. We do have significant numbers of folks living in sub-standard housing though around our state - it's all they can afford - and those new mobile homes look pretty nice until you see what a bad storm can do to one (and here I'm not even talking about hurricanes...). Every time we get hit with a hurricane there's substantial sentiment to prohibit "mobile homes" down here - but economics will prevent any action... Wish it weren't so.. It's not an accident that the first place TV crews head for after a storm is the local trailer park... For anyone considering buying property here (or moving here) the first item I'd suggest you learn about is just how high above sea level.... that property you're considering is... The next item would be to learn just where, locally, is the nearest public parking area where you could leave a vehicle - so that it's not flooded during the storm. Always a few public safety outfits (police, fire, etc.) that have to learn that lesson the hard way... Before I took up guiding (1996) I did a career in law enforcement locally and was my department's representative at all of the local (Miami) disaster preparedness seminars each year as we prepped up for what in my era we just missed - with the exception of hurricane Andrew, a very, very bad one in 1992... Just to illustrate what can happen - that storm, a small but very strong (a full category five...) hurricane was literally aimed at my city - until an hour or two before landfall changed direction and hit 30 miles to the south of us... In short, be safe, do your preparations, stay out of "mobile homes" and if you're in a flood zone - when they say to get out - take heed... One other small point is that October is a very, very bad month for the great storms that come out of Africa.. hope we get missed -one more time...
  11. All of Chokoloskee and Everglades City was still under water yesterday -the photos look pretty grim. Will post an update as I learn more...
  12. Here's what I wrote on another thread about how we fared down here in south Florida... Down here in south Florida we got very lucky and it missed us mostly... except for the storm surge which beat up the lower Keys and the entire area of the coastal Everglades as it passed by. During the storm's passage, the Park (Everglades National Park) had their gates open and I was surprised... After the storm passed, last night they shut down the Park completely, locked the gate (only one road and one gate into the Park - the road to Flamingo....) and won't open again until they can do a full damage assessment... Along with that I've tried today (Thursday) to make a few calls into Everglades City / Chokoloskee , the northwestern boundary of the Park, about thirty miles east of Marco Island and Naples - with no success at all.... I've heard, second hand only, that both the town and the island got flooded.... Not surprising since most of it is very low lying and it doesn't take much to cover it with a storm surge... Will post up when I hear differently... The folks in that area, the Ten Thousand Islands are hardy souls who will get things up and running again as quickly as possible. Visitors and commercial fishing are their sole source of income and very few, it any can qualify for insurance -if they could even afford it.... Nothing like living in a flood zone that gets hit over and over again....
  13. Down here in south Florida we got very lucky and it missed us mostly... except for the storm surge which beat up the lower Keys and the entire area of the coastal Everglades as it passed by. During the storm's passage, the Park (Everglades National Park) had their gates open and I was surprised... After the storm passed, last night they shut down the Park completely, locked the gate (only one road and one gate into the Park - the road to Flamingo....) and won't open again until they can do a full damage assessment... Along with that I've tried today (Thursday) to make a few calls into Everglades City / Chokoloskee , the northwestern boundary of the Park, about thirty miles east of Marco Island and Naples - with no success at all.... I've heard, second hand only, that both the town and the island got flooded.... Not surprising since most of it is very low lying and it doesn't take much to cover it with a storm surge... Will post up when I hear differently... The folks in that area, the Ten Thousand Islands are hardy souls who will get things up and running again as quickly as possible. Visitors and commercial fishing are their sole source of income and very few, it any can qualify for insurance -if they could even afford it.... Nothing like living in a flood zone that gets hit over and over again....
  14. Very surprised to see that Everglades National Park has not locked down for Ian... Usually, if you even say the word hurricane they lock the gates...figure the storm surge alone will be problematic - particularly for the Everglades City / Chokoloskee area since they're barely above sea level as it is... Looks like south Florida got lucky on this one.. . Will report out as soon as I'm able to get back down to Flamingo and / or Chokoloskee for anyone interested. In the meantime everyone along the Gulf coast of Florida will be doing everything they can to prep for what looks like bad news coming their way.. Hope everyone stays safe - and after the storm, once you've sorted out check on your neighbors and assist if needed... Good luck to all.
  15. A quick note… haven’t been able to call up this site for a week or more now. So glad to see it up again … With the weather being the original topic on this thread I’m happy to report that hurricane Ian looks like it will miss down here around Miami but instead head for Tampa and points north while pretty much ruining the fishing from the Keys all the up to the Panhandle area of our state. Lucky me… I’ve only lost three trips I had booked out of Everglades City this week. Hope everyone stays safe and helps out their neighbor after the storm passes …
  16. I'm pretty sure I have a partial box of Keel Hooks - somewhere in my gear (they were stainless, of course, and by Eagle Claw). If I can find them I'll gladly send them to whoever can use them - gratis.. I remember trying to use them - without a lot of success as a beginning tyer in the mid-seventies -and I was pretty much self taught using what few books I could find (this was long before the explosion in our passion on the saltwater side of things..), I also remember tying up the Blonde series on standard hooks - then never having any particular success with them myself... Once I was well on my way as a tyer and finally getting an order or two from one shop or other don't believe I ever got a single request for anything done up on a keel hook...
  17. I’ll settle for a 13 year old with serious computer skills since my grandkids have better skills in that area than I do…
  18. Tried to edit the above post - and once again, although you can call up the edit function - you get a "not allowed" message... frustrating...
  19. Weather down my way (the Miami area) is still just cooking and it's sure to generate a hurricane or two.. Water temps last night in Biscayne at 8pm were 88 degrees at the surface... At 1Am this morning we were waters that had only dropped a single degree... We won't get our first hint of cooler weather usually until the end of the third week of October... Still, we did manage a few fish... but not fly fishing - we were tossing small lures into docklights where we could see small bait getting shredded... Our snook season just opened but any snook has to be a minimum of 28"... so this one swam free This one a bit bigger but still short...
  20. Two attempts to edit the above post - two failures... with a reply stating - this post not accepting any additional info - too much time elapsed to be able to edit (when the elapsed time was actually less than three minutes..). Hope our tech wizards can sort this out.... Frustrating...
  21. Tried yesterday to post a few pics of two patterns I've been working on yesterday - and got the "Forbidden" message... Let's try again and see if maybe this time it works...
  22. Back in the years before fluorocarbon came along, heavy bite tippets with monofilament were problematic (hard to straighten out and prone to allow a clinch knot to make the fly offset and not attractive at all). One of the “fixes” was to snell that heavy leader to the fly so it had to track straight… that in turn encouraged tyers to provide flies with at least 1/4” of bare shank to accommodate the snell. Some of the tarpon patterns I’m still drawing royalties on were developed back then (late eighties). The other “fix” was the leader stretcher that was very popular back then. Once fluoro came along none of that was necessary- but tarpon still eat those same flies even if no one is snelling them any more… ps- the royalties involved are very small… Come up with a pattern like a Clouser or a Copper John… and things change.
  23. Don't be sorry at all... having to post my entire previous post takes up entirely too much space in my opinion... no matter how nice it is to see someone actually paid attention...
  24. As a teenager, in the sixties, I hunted gray squirrels a lot in North Alabama with my trusty Benjamin air rifle - and don't believe I've ever seen a black squirrel.. Fast forward to many years later and both gray and fox squirrel tails were part of my material supplies for both bonefish and tarpon flies... for many years. Very interesting... Here are two tarpon flies with one using gray, the other using fox (or red) squirrel tail collars - they're both my version of Stu Apte's "Apte Too" tarpon bugs from years ago - and yes, occasionally having a weedguard on a tarpon fly might be handy... By the way, a fellow in the natural materials industry mentioned the other day that squirrel skins and tails were getting very hard to come by in bulk for processing, dyeing, and packaging for fly shops... Seems that these days the small monies they generate aren't worth much effort the way they were in past years... Don't think I like these days very much...
  25. I see similar foolishness down in the ‘glades regularly.. The boat ramp I use most days (the interior ramp at Flamingo ) is about 200 feet long - but only about 80 feet of it has docks and it’s where we launch our skiffs and meet our anglers. The rest of it has an occasional big ‘gator or crocodile hauled out and sunning themselves. On more than one occasion I’ve seen families with small kids in hand walk within five feet of them as though they weren’t dangerous at all… and I just hold my breath. Either specie is frighteningly fast on land and if one grabbed a child no one would be able to stop a tragedy from happening at all. The crocs have a reputation as fish eaters but big ‘gators actually kill a few people in Florida almost every year… At that ramp.. and that's me in the background ignoring this eleven footer (the American salty gets a lot bigger...) but as mentioned they're supposed to be fish eaters and not particularly dangerous to people.... this one's a bit smaller and these are the guys visitors are perfectly willing to get entirely too close to in my opinion... Don't have a photo of a big 'gator but they're the ones I'm real careful around - a big one is just plain dangerous - and up for anything it can seize, then drag the victim into the water - and drown it...
×
×
  • Create New...