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Fly Tying

FliesbyNight

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About FliesbyNight

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    Beginner
  • Birthday 08/21/1963

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  • Favorite Species
    Striped Bass
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  • Location
    Barnegat, NJ

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  1. This thread has been covered fairly well, but i'll throw in my thoughts as well. First: Why are you tying your own flies? If you are tying for enjoyment, then cut them apart until you can get them exactly the way you want them If you are tying to catch fish, then tie inconsistently. The only opinion of any value on your tying and fishing abilities is supplied by the fish. Second: Use both of those Prince Nymphs in a situation you think that is the Go-To fly. See which one works better on your local water and you will have a clue as to which is the "better" fly so you have something tangible to focus our efforts on. Third: It's only a mistake if you don't learn anything from making it. Your tying will improve over time if you work at it. If you consistency try building your flies in stages, like a commercial tier. Do the same step on a dozen flies and then go to the next. Fourth: Most people put too much emphasis on the fly and not enough on the presentation. I've caught fish on flies that looked like something the cat barfed up. If you match the size, basic shape and color the fish are looking for, you will get hits. More important is the presentation. The fly has to act like what the fish are looking for and has to get into their feeding zone. I can't talk to trout, I'm a saltwater guy. Maybe trout need to have that size 16 Adams with the perfect coloration and hackle. What I have found is if the fly looks acts like food, they will eat it.
  2. WWKimba, I use a slightly different method so I never worry about which pattern should be weighted and which just have the weight added for experimentation or other purposes. I follow the KISS principle (Keep It Simple, Stupid) by adding a few wraps of red thread at the base (not the eye side) of the head to all weighted flies no matter what the head color should be. If the head should be red then a few wraps of black indicate the weighted flies. If I am looking for a weighted fly, the red wraps at the base of the head are the ticket. This way, the indicator is consistent throughout all my patterns. Maybe it even adds a little gill slit but I think gill slits are mostly for the fisherman's benefit. I have never noticed any advantage to a fly with a red throat over those that don't. Kudos for de-barbing your hooks. Better for the fish, better for you and no loss of fish if you keep the line tight. I started doing it after sinking a 1/0 hook into my upper lip all the way to the bend. had to pop it through again to cut off the barb to get it out. Not fun but I am trainable. That will never happen again.
  3. Don't focus on one or two patterns at first. Tie one of every pattern you can find. That way you learn every possible technique in the shortest possible time.
  4. Thanks for posting this Capt. Bob. I'll be tying some of these as I am positive stripers and bluefish will like them as well. Chartreuse for the daylight and black for night. The blues will make a mess of them pretty quick but I don't think I'll mind that too much...
  5. Feathers5, J. Stockard carries them in 6 sizes from 6 to 2/0. They are pricey at 60 cents per hook for sizes 6, 4, 2 & 1. 80 cents for size 1/0 $1 each for size 2/0. I'll stick with bending my own for the few bendbacks I tie. Not only are bendback mostly weedless, they are also good for fish with keen eyesight, like albies, that can be hook shy.
  6. Mark, First of all: A sincere thank you. I thought I had a problem but your post has allayed my fears. I'm a piker compared to you and your collection of materials. Nice job of the tying desk. You've given me an idea or two for when I get around to modifying mine.
  7. Here's a sand eel pattern I use a lot this time of year. The heavy eyes and bent hook make it ride tail up, like a sand eel trying to burrow and escape. The braid keeps everything in place and is stiffened with UV resin brushed on.
  8. petelangevin, Kimo posted step by step instructions for posting full size pictures in the "What are you working on thread in this forum. If you don't have a Facebook account, you can use Imgur, which is a free picture hosting site. The instructions are basically the same.
  9. Chugbug, Along the same lines as A Fly Fisherman's Guide to Saltwater Prey, which is excellent BTW, I would also suggest Featherbrain by Drew Chicone.
  10. Kimo, Thanks for the tip about linking photos from Facebook. That makes for a better post by getting rid of the thumbnails.
  11. DFoster and MikeChell, thanks. I had a good time planning and making the features. Mogup, Thanks. Now I'll have an earworm every time Im put a hook in that vise!
  12. Very nice work, Terry. I've been thinking about making one myself. I'll be shamelessly stealing part of your design.
  13. Just finished my tying desk. At least until I figure out what to add or change. Much better than the duffel bag I was using. There's actually more light in the room than the picture shows but with the hidden LEDs under the top section and the gooseneck lamp over the vise, it's not an issue.
  14. Capt. Bob, Thanks for that insight. Looks like I had part of it right at any rate. Its winter here and fishing is slowing down considerably. I'll be tying some longer leaders experimenting when spring finally arrives.
  15. Walpy, One thing I just learned that might bear on your question. I just came back from a trip and fished Tampa Bay, which is not too far from where you'll be. I fished a two day guided trip and the first day I used the guide's equipment. Did really well and the first day was all I hoped except I missed an inshore slam on the fly because the nice red I tied into broke me off on an oyster bar. I couldn't turn him fast enough with the 9#, mostly me not being used to fishing in close quarters. Got one red on bait and some snook and trout on the fly so I got the slam, but well, you know... The next day I started with my 10#. I figured the extra spine might help and I wanted to use my own set up for the chance at another slam completely on the fly. Nothing wrong with the guide's stuff, just the added personal bonus of using my own rod, reel and flies. Anyway, I got bupkus for the first hour. I switched back to the guide's set up and immediately started getting consistent hook ups with some snook that suddenly seemed eager to eat my fly. The main difference was the color of the line and length of the leader. I live in New Jersey and the water here is usually somewhat murky, especially after the boaters start churning it up. I use RIO Versatip that has a chartreuse floating head with typically a 9' leader for top of the column fishing. The guide was set up with a more subdued WF-F line in light blue with an 11' leader. I got a few follows but no takes with my set up. I changed to his set up and was in business. Same fly, same presentation but the fish were obviously spooked by the shorter leader and more visible fly line. Something to think about. I know I'll be using a clear or subdued fly line when I go back. I might even try longer leaders in my home waters when the breeze allows it. By the way, two days of fishing and two days of golf seems just about right. For a trip of four days that is....
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