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perchjerker

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Everything posted by perchjerker

  1. Now we all know who has the 'short fuse'. Perhaps you should practice what you preach, Mr. Administrator!!! Me thinks the pot just called the kettle black!
  2. flytire has it "dead on" in both posts. And it has nothing to do with tying Right or Left handed. One can apply as much tension to the thread by pulling it towards the body as they can pulling it away.
  3. Matarelli. Been using them for over 30 years with no problems. Unless you tie commercially, there is no need to worry abut the thread "cutting a groove" in the end of the SS tube. Not certain that this is even a concern for the commercial tier! Ceramics are nice, but for the 'casual' tier, are a waste of money IMHO. (Yes, I have some.)
  4. Steve... I do not understand your inference about 'tone', as all I have done is give a straightforward rebuttal to your posts. At any rate, I rest my case in facts; not opinion. Frank
  5. Cream... Thanks, but I still have not seen any of his work! I have seen pictures before. Pictures do not compare to actually seeing the bug itself; at least for me; and I have had Mike's works in my 'hot little hand'. Cheers! Frank
  6. I have not actually seen any of Cohen's work, so can't make an honest comparison. I have watched Mike tie on four occasions, and have had him give me some personal instruction on how he does some of the things he does. I hope to see him again this Saturday, Feb 2. My comment was not made with the intent of comparing one o's work with that of another. Just a simple statement. Cheers! Frank
  7. That makes no sense perchjerker. Steeldrifter... This response makes me wonder if you truly understand what a level lines is, and what a double taper line is; in spite of the fact that I know that you do! Your 'analogy' with a tapered leader is so far off course as to be meaningless. The rest of your response is not germane to the subject. For a refresher: A level line is of uniform diameter for it's entire length. A double taper line has a short taper on each end, with the bulk of the line being of uniform diameter for the bulk of it's length; ergo, it is nothing more than a level line with a short taper on each end. I fail to see why this "...makes no sense...". Does this not make sense now? Or was your response an "OOOOPS"? Peace, Frank Frank I have been fly fishing for 25 yrs and build rods for my main source of living, I believe I have a very good understanding of fly lines thank you very much. As I said previous, I'm not gonna argue with someone I don't even know over the internet. You have your opinions, I have mine, simple as that. Take care. Steve Steve... I regret that you did NOT pick up on my note that I am aware of your knowledge of fly lines, giving credit where credit is due, and thus, seem to take my comment personally. As I bought my first fly rod in 1952, possibly long before you were born, I will leave the math to you to figure out how long I have been fly fishing; which, quite frankly, as well as your experience at building rods, has nothing to do with the 'facts' of my statement about a DT line being nothing more than a level line with a taper on each end. No argument, just a debate!! Cheers! Frank
  8. For those who want to use a Dremel to drive your dubbing brush maker and find that it turns too fast; as the motor has brushes in it, you can operate it through a rheostat to slow it down to a complete stop. A standard light dimmer switch is a rheostat, and works great for just such application. Here is a pic of what I cobbled together a few years back for just such purposes.
  9. The ubiquitous English sparrow is also known as the "house sparrow'. They are NOT protected. However, as noted, there are numerous species; and many do very closely resemble the House, or English sparrow. Most of them, fortunately, do not typically inhabit residential areas.
  10. Forgot to mention all of the various length and line weight graphite Fenwicks I also have. They too are great rods!
  11. I don't see how it follows that the lower mass fly line goes farther. If the caster puts the same amount of energy (Kinetic Energy KE) into both, the lighter line must go faster to have the same energy as the heaver and therefore slower line. However, this does not mean that it goes farther. The distance the line travels can be found by this formula right out of a basic physics book: distance = KE / average resisting force If both have the same KE and the same average resisting force, the distance will be identical. But will they have the same resisting force? The level line has a larger diameter at it's end than the DT line so that adds air resistance, slows the line and therefore decreases distance. The faster line has it's disadvantage too. Drag on an object through a fluid (air) increases at the SQUARE of velocity. So a small increase in velocity means a big increase in drag (resisting force) and therefore a decrease in distance. Which would go farther? You would just have to cast them and see. Also, different lines, weights, manufacturers, etc. may give different results. Sorry for the boring physics lesson. I just couldn't help myself. heavynets.. You are definitely correct; but, you addressed something entirely different from what steeldrifter actually said. He is talking about loss of energy along the line as the cast unfurls as related to the diameter of that line. It stands to reason that as A line gets smaller in diameter, it loses capacity to transmit energy. If this were not true, every dry fly ever cast would hit the water like an anvil. Also, this is why electrical transmission lines get larger, or smaller, as the imparted voltage to be 'transported' goes up or down.
  12. Yes and Yes! I even occasionally use my old Fenwick "glass" rod, and truly enjoy it's slow action for throwing large hairy bass bugs!
  13. BTA is absolutely correct! House sparrows, feral pigeons and starlings, with a few other 'oddball' species are NOT protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA). Therefore, you can "take" and "Use" as you see fit. The only possible exc3ption would be if you live in a community that prohibits the discharge of a gun of any type, including BB guns, inside the corporate limits. If there is such a prohibition, simply trap them!
  14. Also look for Pantone, as they have an unbelievable range of colors, and they are permanent.
  15. That makes no sense perchjerker. Steeldrifter... This response makes me wonder if you truly understand what a level lines is, and what a double taper line is; in spite of the fact that I know that you do! Your 'analogy' with a tapered leader is so far off course as to be meaningless. The rest of your response is not germane to the subject. For a refresher: A level line is of uniform diameter for it's entire length. A double taper line has a short taper on each end, with the bulk of the line being of uniform diameter for the bulk of it's length; ergo, it is nothing more than a level line with a short taper on each end. I fail to see why this "...makes no sense...". Does this not make sense now? Or was your response an "OOOOPS"? Peace, Frank
  16. A short comment on level fly lines, and their historic role in rod taper design. If you will take a look at the so called "vintage" bamboo fly rods, most all will have letters, such as "HDH or E" written on the butt section, the alpha system is the "old" line weight rating system, and this example says the the rod was designed for 6wt DT line AND/OR a 5wt L (level line). Their tapers were designed for both type lines, as Weight Forward lines were a thing of the FUTURE. All that any DT line is is a LEVEL LINE with TAPERED ENDS!! IMHO any decent caster should have no trouble casting a level line. I cut my "fly fishing teeth" in 1952 on a first generation Shakespeare "Art Howald Process Hollow Glass" rod, which I still have, and a level line. If I can do it, anyone can! Cheers!
  17. Incidentally, as a teenager in the late 40's and early 50's, I used to take a pump .22 rifle loaded with 'rat shot' to the barn to kill rats. Now I take an AK-47! Can't say that the barn isn't well ventilated since the change.
  18. Now that you fully explained both yourself and your initial question, the answer to your fundamental questions is YES; they could make them that way; i.e., with the mono leader built in. However, given the fundamental way they are made, do you have any idea what doing it this way would do to market prices? They would be completely out of sight! Furthermore, this would deprive the buyer of making their own decision relative to leader type; mono, fluoro, or even furled, to say nothing of the taper dimensions.
  19. Hmmmm; wonder just how tightly Mike George could pack with one of these? Could he convert the deer hair to a solid mass? He can pack tight enough with the Brassie to be able to use sandpaper for the final finish.
  20. The line and the leader/tippet are three quite different entities. The line has the weight that is being cast, with the leader, tippet, and the fly simply 'going along for the ride'. The tapered leader transmits the energy in the fly line to the fly by means of the tippet. The tippet, among other things, permits the 'soft' delicate landing so desired when fishing dry flies. Therefore, each serves a different purpose. As for the line itself, it does NOT have to be tapered; a level line will work. However, a double taper line, as well as a weight forward line, each have their place and serve a specific purpose.
  21. Craig Matthews, owner of Blue Ribbon Flies in West Yellowstone, WY, can fix you up with the proper hair for comparaduns. (No financial interest.)
  22. For all intents and purposes, all feathers from any bird can be used in fly tying. Neck and body feathers from a pigeon can be used for hackling 'soft-hackles,. Slips made from the flight primaries can be used for wings on both wet and dry flies; and, there is s technique for stripping the top, colored part, off the quill of the flight feathers, producing a strip that can be used for quill-bodied flies. Just use your imagination.
  23. Kirk... To create dots like those, all one has to do is to make a stencil ("mask") by punching holes in a piece of heavy paper or thin flexible plastic. A paper punch, r even a leather punch will work, and the leather punch has a rotary wheel of several different size punches. Cheers! Frank
  24. andre_tb22... In my 40+ years of tying, you are the first to make such a comment on floatability relative to tightness of packing that I have encountered, and I have watched such deer hair tiers as Chris Helm, Dave Whitlock, and Mike George tie.I pack as tightly as I can, and I have absolutely no problems with floatability of my bugs, or their submersibility of my divers. tctrout... All of the deer hair tiers of my acquaintance do it 'in reverse' of what you do; they do the initial shaping (roughing out) with scissors, preferably curved, and do the 'finishing' trimming with the razor blade. Interesting approach! Cheers!
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