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flyfisher76544

bead head help

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On some hooks it can be difficult if the hook has a small gap. The only way(that I know of) to get a bead on a hook like that is to crimp the barb so it will allow the bead to go on a little easier.

 

Sometimes you can get them to slide on(depending on bead size and hook) but it takes quite a bit of force. Be careful hooks are sharp. blink.gif

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also, once you do get it on, I like to wrap a little bit of lead wire onto the hook then slide it up into the bead to keep it from moving. This also helps make a tighter(and heavier) fly.

 

If you dont like lead, then you will probably have to build it up with thread until the bead doesnt move much.

 

Like Will said, some hooks are just plain difficult to get beads on. when that happens, I save those hooks for something else, or try switching beads or hooks until I find a pair that jive. sometimes that is all it takes.

 

Joe

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You might just need a little bit more force to get the bead over the barb. If it still won't go, then I would also recommend pinching the barb down. In my opinion, that's better for the fish anyway.

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I was out at www.canadianllama.com the other day and their tungsten beads are slotted on the back side (instead of just the larger hole). Looks like this design could help these beads slide around the hook gap more easily.

 

Until I get a chance to try these, I'll continue to use pliers to 'persuade' the bead to make the corner.

 

-Bamboo

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What I do is use my old vise and put the point of the hook in the bead and then rest the bead on the jaws of my old vise and push the hook in. The bead will stay on top of the vise and the hook point will slide through the split of the vice jaws. If it is real tight Ill take a set of pliars and whack the back of the hook with some force (Im not hauling off on it) and it wil normally pop in. I find smaller limerick bends to be near impossible all other of good size work ok to perfect.

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Check out this web page, how to tie a chenille body streamer, after I get the bead on the hook, I wrap the amount of lead I need, then I push the led up inside the larger hole of the bead head that is facing the rear. Next I wrap a ramp up the back side of the lead, this kind of "packs" the lead up tight to the beadhead. After the ramp is made, I wrap in the same direction as the lead over the lead and in between it's wraps to really snug things up. Then I wrap my thread to the rear of the hook and tie whatever dressings I happen to be using for that paticular fly. BTW, something else I do is give the lead a thin coating of head cement, in the Al Beatty Interview he did for the site a while back he said he applied head cemen to his lead wraps and I figured he did it for an important reason so I figured I should do it too.

 

Why do you do that Al?

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For beads that need help getting around the bend, I pinch down the barb, slide bead over hook point and as fas along as possible, put the hook back in the vise, lift up on the eye and slide the bead up and over. Some hooks can shatter if stressed too much, especially black steelhead hooks.

Graham

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Chart? You mean there is a chart for those? :dunno: I always used the trial and error method for sizing. Just start trying them until I found what firs.

 

You do have to be careful when you put then on. I'm always poking the [email protected]#* out of my fingers trying to get them over the barb.

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Hi Folks & OLB,

 

I pinch the hook barb then place it in the vise with the shank going up & down with the hook point up. Then I use a Jim Schollmeyer technique using my Sure Grip tweezers (alway shut, must be forced open) that I placed a couple coats of glue on the tips. Jim outlined his technique in the most recent issue of Tying & Fishing Journal. It is well worth the price just for that article.

 

Regarding OLB's question on lead wraps: I coat the wraps for two reasons: 1) to keep them from slipping on the hook shank, and 2) seal coat them so they don't "bleed" through into light colored dubbing causing discoloration. Take care & ...

 

Tight Lines - Al Beatty

www.btsflyfishing.com

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