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B.C.TroutHunter

Silver plated hooks anyone?

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Well, this kinda hit me when I was busy doing my Chem 12.

Ok, before I begin I just want to give you a chemical formula: AgNO3 (l/aq) + e^- ---> Ag (s) + NO3^- (aq)

Now what does this mean? AgNO3 is the formula for silver nitrate (a liquid/aquas substance that is/use to be disposed of by hospitals) plus an electron makes SOLID silver and nitrate.

 

So here is the setup:

An 11 amp battery (this will be where the electrons come from) will with two seperate wires attached to it. On the wire that has is attached to the positive, wrap some of the bare wire of the other end around a salmon hook.

Next get a clear bowl, and pour in the silver nitrate, and then stick the negative wire and the hook into the solution (but don't let the ends touch).

Soon, little bits of silver should start appearing on the hook as the solid silver forms on it.

 

That my friends is my hypothesis on how to create "home made" silver plated hooks. Now just to find some silver nitrate to test it. :devil:

 

(I e-mailed the author of the text book to see what he thinks of the idea. I'll keep ya posted. :devil: )

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Or, you could just buy some silver Alec Jackson spey hooks and save yourself a hazardous waste disposal problem. :)

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That's the way we used to plate pennys when I was a kid - Silver Nitrate's expensive though ain't it?

 

Why not stick Copper Sulphate and make some more unusual looking hooks? (!)

 

Dave

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You'll need a bit more than that....you'll also need some silver as the source for one of the electrodes. It won't have to be a great amount. The hook will serve as the cathode in this cell. The amount of silver deposited can be calculated by the current run through the cell times the time in seconds. current is measured in amperes. One ampere = 1 Coulomb per second. You then have to convert the Coulombs to Faradays (moles of electrons). You do this by dividing the number of Coulombs by 96,500 Coulombs/Faraday to yield Faradys. since silver requires only one electron to be reduced, the number of Faradays in this case will equal to number of moles deposited. The number of moles deposited times 107.87 g/mol will give you number of grams plated.

 

Caveats: The hook MUST be bare metal, no laquer of finish on it whatsoever. Very high quality plating often involves plating of a series of metals. Prior to silver plating many platers first plate coper. For chrome plating, most platers shooting for high quality plate nickel prior to the copper. The surfaces must be scrupulously clean ed between each step to get desirable results.

 

In other words, its not as easy as it first appears, since almost all hooks have some kind of finish on them.

 

And silver nitrate is fairly expensive. (There's aboput a hundred pounds of the stuff in our safe in the stockroom since some industrial company gave it to our university when they no longer needed it. We haven't had to buy any for a long time.)

 

Mark Delaney

(and yes, I REALLY am what my name imples...a chemistry professor, at McNeese State University)

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Yeah, you can do that. You can also copper plate and gold plate. Try a chemical supply store, they ought to have the chemicals. Nothing I think that would be difficult to buy. Watch the fumes though. In the Dental market, there are gold and silver plating solutions that don't require a nugget of the raw metal in the mix. Pretty expensive stuff though.

 

I did a copper plated hook once and it looks just like copper. I didn't even dress it because I figured anyone looking at it would think it was just copper wire and what kind of difficulty would it be to make a copper hook! :hyst:

 

Happy Trails!

Ronn

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I also forgot to mention that most people who plate copper or silver then also put a coat of clear lacquer over things since the silver will eventially tarnish just with exposure to the air as will the copper. That obviously is the last step.

 

Mark Delaney

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chemprof2001 - Ah yea, I have forgoten about the silver electrode, thanks for pointing that out. If you have one of J. L. Wile's Advanced Chemistry text books, in Module 9 page 292 he says that during college years he used the setup I just described (except with two silver electrodes) to form more solid silver (which he was actually able to sell to jewlers who made their own jewlery). He uses this setup in the text book to give the students an example of how to calculate how long it would take 100 grams of silver (first calculating the moles of Ag, then the moles of electrons, convert that to Coulombs, and then dividing that by the amps.). Thank you for the input and the "heads-up" that the hook may have a finish.

 

I have yet to try this out, but I know of a few doctor friends who may be able to get me some silver nitrate at a cheaper price then.

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You can use this process to elctrorefine less pure silver into more pure silver, which is what I assume is what he was doing. In that case you plate from the less pure silver side to the more pure silver side, leaving the unweanted impurities behind. The trick is being extremely clean, to get good results.

 

Mark Delaney

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:blink: ummm yeah...what the professor said :dunno: I'm pretty sure I'm with TroutBum on this one.

 

Ashby

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TB said "Or, you could just buy some silver Alec Jackson spey hooks"

 

Of course I could just go buy a nicely tied fully dressed display fly for say $200, and be $1000's ahead of the material that I've collected. :hyst:

 

 

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