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Joe Hard

Toluene

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You know what the funniest part of this thread is ?

 

He probably could have asked any women......." Hey honey, how do you thin this shiz" .......... She would have then handed him a bottle and said " Here..... (idiot).........try not to spill any on the floor"....

 

DOH :ph34r:

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You know what the funniest part of this thread is ?

 

He probably could have asked any women......." Hey honey, how do you thin this shiz" .......... She would have then handed him a bottle and said " Here..... (idiot).........try not to spill any on the floor"....

 

DOH :ph34r:

 

:hyst: :hyst: :hyst:

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Just to be sure we all understand:

 

Benzene is a known carcinogen

Toluene is a known carcinogen <--- OOPS! I have been corrected! "suspected" not "known"

Xylene(s) is (are) a known carcinogen <--- OOPS! I have been corrected! "suspected" not "known"

ACETONE is a known carcinogen <--- OOPS! I have been corrected! "suspected" not "known"

 

ALL these, and similar solvents, are organic compounds which are well known carcinogens. :shocking:<--- OOPS! "suspected" not "known"

 

We should all use them in well ventilated areas. That is why it says so on the container!

 

We REALLY NEED to pay attention to this and take action. Even setting up a fan to circulate the air more can help.

 

"knowledge is power; protect your health"

 

FLYUSER

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Just so YOU understand...YOU'VE got it WRONG!! Toluene and xylene are suspected carcinogens, NOT known carcinogens. the reason they are lsited as such is due to their structural similarities to benzene (which is why the weird California rules classify them as things they are not). suspected carcinogens are materials classified as such because they are structurally related or not enough data has been collected on the materials. Toluene and xylene although not known carcinogens are definitely not good for you. Vapors from both are very toxic to the liver. I use toluene all the time as a chemist, and its use is relatively benigh if care is taken to minimize vapor exposure and skin exposure. If I have to use benzene in the lab, however, a whole new set of safety rules comes into play...a lot more protective gear must be worn. The words "known" and "suspected" in legal parlance for organic chemiscals mean two entirely different things.

 

Mark Delaney

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Well Mark, I sincerely apologize for the inaccuracy. I most certainly am not going to argue with an Associate Professor of Chemistry about "known" versus "suspected" properties based on chemical structure.

 

Speaking for myself: "suspected" based on similar chemical structure is good enough for me! I avoid inhaling organic solvents.

 

Your point is well taken.

 

Perhaps we have an Epidemiologist, or a Toxicologist who is a member of the Flytyingforum who can weigh-in with their scholarly opinion?

:hyst:

 

FLYUSER

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I'm not sure he is a member of this site, but Henk Verhaar is the person you'd be looking for...that's what hed does for a living (in the Netherlands, I believe). He is a member of teh Virtual Fly Box e-mail list and often weighs in there and toxicology issues.

 

I'm a chemist, but I DO avoid unnecessary exposures to organic chemicals. If you want to find the toxicology properties of a substance, do a Google search for the name of the compound, and then a space and add +MSDS . that should get you to a coupy of the Material Safety Data Safety sheet. One warning: the lawyers have gotten to these and have tried to limit liability of their companies. An example of one of the the MSDS's I received a couple of years ago:

 

Protective clothing required: respirator, gloves face shield. Problem: may cause silicosis (ture but you'd have to be in a very special place for that to happen). Avoid contact with skin.

 

What was the product? Washed and ignited (cleaned) beach sand. don't know about you, but I'm not going to wear a respirator for a day at the beach. the special place where you might get silicosis from sand is only in the middle of a sandstorm.

 

Mark Delaney

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