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flypimp

Second attempt

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Well I got the materials put together to ty some classic wet flies for the first time and I tied two Orange Sedge's

The first :wallbash: but the second came out all right. I have a couple of questions do you clip the wings or do you use the wing tips to form the end of the wing, second I had a really hard time getting the wings not to fold over, is there an easy way of keeping them from folding? Thanks I'll post a pic of the second later tonight.

Flypimppost-5126-1158113887_thumb.jpg

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Don't clip the wings. No, you don't use the tips of the feathers. It looks to me like you have a bit too much dubbing on the forward part which causes bulk problems. End the body a fair distance back from the eye and taper it down there. You can then cover the area right in front of it with your throat and level it out on top so you can seat your wing basically on bare hook albeit it is covered with thread by now but nothing else.

 

Wing folding problems? Practice, practice, practice. Pay attention to EVERY TINY THING you do and anylize why it either works or doesn't and try do do something new to fix it.

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flypimp:

 

Your question regarding the tips of the feathers on duck or goose quill wings; leaves me wondering re: Ronn's reply. He gave good advice, but perhaps I perceive your question about clipping or not clipping the ends of the wings on the wet fly a little differently. And I'm just guessing but I think Ronn may have thought you meant the actual "end" of the feathers, rather than each section. Maybe not, but perhaps I can help with this advice:

 

You do want to use the natural tapered ends of each each wing quill section that you cut from your matched pairs of wing quills for each individual fly. Never use scissors to cut the ends of wet fly wings.

 

And folding problems: are you referring to the wing itself, bending, folding, or collapsing under the thread tension? If so, this procedure of tying in the wing is all about proper thread tension and material handling.

 

What has worked the best for me, and the only method I teach on trout wet flies, is to secure the wing in place with a firm pinch of thumb and middle finger of the opposite hand. Middle finger because you get much more surface coverage with your fingertip grasp that when using your index finger. It also creates a more perfectly aligned horizontal pinch of the wings you are attempting to set properly. Try it and notice the difference. :)

 

The bottom edge of both wing quill slips should rest on the hook shank, held secure within your fingertip pinch.

 

As you begin the first wrap and before starting the second wrap, you must do two things simultaneously.

 

1) Slowly increase your thread tension to maximum. I do this when the thread is at about an eight o'clock position relative to the hook shank.

 

2) As you do this, maintain a perfectly aligned vertical pinch of the wing at the tie-in point, and do not allow the wing to roll or slip out of place. It is normal for the wing to want to roll over on the top edge to follow the wrap of the thread. You must counteract this by pressing back toward you, (if you wrap clockwise, right-handed), in the opposite direction of the thread wrap. A tight pinch at this moment as the thread engages the top of the quill sections prevents the wings from folding over.

With practice you'll actually develop a sense of what is happening within your fingertip pinch and gain a confidence when you know it's right, like throwing a dart when you know it's gonna' be a bullseye. Or throwing a ringer at horseshoes. You just know that it's right, and this, like Ronn indicated, only comes with practice. ;)

 

Make five to no more than six additional tight turns, each at maximum thread tension. At this point check the position of the wing. If not perfectly aligned you can undo the thread wraps and have another go. Once you become familiar with the tight thread tension and the correct finger pinch, setting wet fly wings suddenly becomes easy.

 

Remember this on the tension: if you pull on the thread after you have made the initial five or six wraps and your wing moves, you have not tied it in tight enough. Do over until the wings are completely immobile when placed under additional thread tension.

 

And this applies to anything you tie. Any material that moves about the hook shank after you have tied in is caused by the thread stretching and pulling the material around the shank with it as it goes. Materials tied in under maximum tension should not and will not move.

 

Hope this helps!

 

Don

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Thank you Don, that helps! I would just like to let you know I read your story in Fly Tyer Mag, and thats what got me started branching out into tying classic's,

Thanks for the help,

Flypimp

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Flypimp:

 

I kind of thought so when I saw the Orange Sedge 'cuz it was in the article. B)

 

Thanks for the compliment, glad you enjoyed the article! I just love it when my interest spills over and gets other tyers going on wet flies. They are fun to tie, they are beautiful, and they still catch fish!!

Don

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