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Goku

How to make a mixed wing

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Here's a quick tutorial:

 

1: prepare for the wing, you need slices of feathers on boths sides.

 

2: tye down fibres of GP tippets (ups, my underwing was to short here..)

 

3: here's the trick - put the slices of feathers on top of each other, the shortest on top and the longer should be aprox same lenght.

 

4: .....

 

5-6: now tye down the first wing..

 

7-8: and the far side one...

 

9: when you are done making the wing, you give the wing a stroke with your fingers and nails, so the mix together. You kinda squeeze them together :rolleyes:

 

10-11: cut a piece of mallard and mount it on the top

 

12: if you're trying to make this wing, you will notice that they are not kinda supporting each other. When you are cutting down the but end, you have to hold it like this (see the picture) when you're doing it. After you have finished to cut of the rest, you'll notice that the heat and pressure from the fingers will make the wing flatt as a normal married wing would look like.

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That is briliant - exactly explains how you achieve what you're doing so perfectly.

Expect LOTS more ixed jobs from me now I see how you do them your way.

Dave

 

PS It's totally different to the way Kelson describes!

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Thank you!

 

Okay, so are you holding the slices "side-by-side", and letting the step where you squeeze them force them to "fan" upwards?

 

I love the look of these wings. I'd really like to get this technique down so I can use it on my fishing flies for this falls salmon run.

 

EDIT: One other question, how do you keep the barbs from each "slice" from marrying to each other?

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Goku,

 

Thanks for posting this. I have been wondering about wings; everyone's knowledge helps. I really appreciate your taking the time to do this with and emplanation and great photos.

 

Ray

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15 X 1000 words = 15,000 words ... yes it's worth alot to see it in pictures. Excellent job Long and thanks for taking the time to put this together.

 

:headbang: :headbang: :headbang: :headbang: :headbang:

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Goku,

 

I am totally new at this, tying any kind of flies and especially the Classic Salmons. I am in the course and am going slowly but surely, and learning a lot as I go along. My question is, how does the completely finsihed Popham look. I know the image, second from the last on the bottom row, is nearly there, but how does the completely finished fly appear? Are the feathers mixed at they are in your picture, or are the separated into their individual groups like the one below:

IPB Image

 

Thanks again,

 

Ray

 

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Harold,

 

That looks like a married wing fly in your picture.

 

Long,

 

Thank you so much for the tutorial. I love the look of these flies and think that this will be most fun to try. Is there a rule of thumb for the length of the wing on these flies to know how short is acceptable since it is shorter than married wings?

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That looks like a married wing fly in your picture.

 

Matt, Goku, everyone,

 

I searched for Pophams and the fly I posted is listed as a Popham. Clear this up for me, married wing flies are totally different to mixed wing flies, in that mixed wing flies truly have mixed wings with all the different types of hackle mixed together, like Goku's fly above. Is that right?

 

Thanks,

 

Ray

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Ray-

 

I think the Popham mixed and the Popham married are exactly the same materials wise, but the difference is like you said, mixed wing flies have the fibers all mixed up, and married wing flies have them neatly tied together. Most of the very old flies I have seen are mixed wing, and I think there is some mild mixing that takes place when you actually fish with them.

 

Hopefully someone else can confirm this, I am no expert.

 

Ryan

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Harold,

 

That looks like a married wing fly in your picture.

 

Long,

 

Thank you so much for the tutorial. I love the look of these flies and think that this will be most fun to try. Is there a rule of thumb for the length of the wing on these flies to know how short is acceptable since it is shorter than married wings?

Nothing to thanks guys!!

 

Matt, yes, the wing should be a little longer than the hook, it's just me who used a too big hook :whistle:

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Well, if you would stop using such long shanked hooks, the wings would be longer! Great work Long, I have seen most of the mixed wings be a little shorter than normal and I thought that they were supposed to be that way. Thanks for the picture of the old flies also!

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Now, if I could only figure out how to get those uneven strands of tippet to site right!!!! I never realized the main wing method was merely LAYING the strips on top of each other!

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