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Bud Guidry

Affects of Ultra Violet Light

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i'm wondering if anyone here would know if ultra violet light affects any type of feathers? do any of you know if there is a certain species that has feathers that luminate under ultra violet light?

 

it's something i've been wondering about for some time now. some animal species, insects and minerals glow under ultra violet. could there be a species of bird that glows under these conditions. any info would be greatly appreciated.

 

do fish see ultra violet?

 

Bud

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I don't know about feathers that reflect UV light, but fish do see UV rays.

 

This may help:

 

What fish see: http://www.underwaterfishinglights.net/What-Fish-See.htm

 

How Fish See and use UV rays to find bait fish: http://www.halibut.net/What-Fish-See.htm

 

Edit: I had a black light in college and I recall that anything white or florescent (like a yellow highlighter) glowed like a beacon in it. Blacklight is UVA rays, I think which is close to what fish see.

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Hey Bud I remember talking to Dave McNeese about this subject. He has done quite of bit of research on it. Cant really remember all the specifics about it. I think Mr. McNeese was at Ronns house for your get together so maybe Ronn or someone else will know how to get ahold of him. As I remember he had alot to offer on the subject. Kevin

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Bud-I think I know what you are getting at here.hehehehe

 

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Bud, Whenever I go out doing demo's, I carry either a small "blacklight" fluorescent detector used for checking banknotes or a keyring lamp that does the same job but a a different wavelength. It's easy to demonstrate in low light conditions how man made materials fluoresce; they really stand out even just a few fibres mixed in with other natural and dyed materials.

 

I have never bothered to try many natural feathers etc, but there are many which do fluoresce. Some of them are quite surprisingly dull to the naked eye though.

 

For a few $ you will be quite surprised how things change under u.v. I have looked into (film) photography of same and there are many facets which are available with some research. Nikon used to make a lense especially for u.v. work for example. I think other than research its main use was in forensics. There are filters a y44 (by hoya) that can also be used in conjunction with normal lenses to detect u.v. etc.

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Hey Bud and all!

 

You've found a subject to pull me out of hiding :P

 

McNeese is the man on this subject. One of the first flies tied with this in mind was Wes Drain and his "Drains 20" Look it up in The original "steelhead flies and fly tying" By Trey combs.

 

The fly uses Cock of the rock (natural UV reflector) and Toucan (also UV reflector) in the wing. It also uses flourescent floss in the body, which flourescent colors were not very popular at the time.

 

The idea is that steelhead and salmon can see uv light relfections (as can other animals such as birds, and butterflies) giving a fly tied with uv reflecting materials and advantage over one without.

 

There are many butterflies and birds that look rather plain to human eyes. But when viewed through the UV spectrum are very brilliant, and I suppose that's natures way of helping animals find mates and food/prey.

 

Aaron

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thanks guys, Aaron, you have no idea how good it is to see you here. i missed you my friend,

 

Steve, thanks for the phone call

 

Steven, you got me nailed and yes it will become reality. the photography of it all should really shine, fully dressed in ultra violet ! Bud

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Bud,

 

I've been around lurking here. Sorry to have missed you and the gang :( The salmon fly fire has not been burning brightly for me lately. Just a bit burned out, un-inspired feeling as of late..... But the dark days of winter are coming and that usually ushers in a new crop of ideas that help beat the cabin fever, and gets me to tying.

 

I've been busy, though. My family, little one, and pup have been keeping me on my toes.

 

Can't wait to see what you've been up to with the UV......

 

I'll give you a ring soon.

 

Aaron

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it would be a pleasure to talk for awhile Aaron.

 

i'll call you later this evening or tommorow evening. i got to run again, been on the road all day and came home for a few and off again.

 

again, it's really good to see you around, Bud

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Hi Bud,

 

Both fish and birds can see into the ultraviolet range. The best way to determine how luminescent a feather is is to run a black light over it. For instance Birds of Paradise with feathers in the yellow, yellow/green and blue range are the most reactive. However the Metallic feathering of the BOP’s are not so affected under a black light, however these feathers are highly reflective of the UVB spectrum of sunlight.

 

GSB

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one thing about feathers and UV , is they need to come from birds near or in the mating season. Atleast I think that i ssome of what DM has taught us. Male Red Wings in the spring are excellent but later on lose their UV reflectivness(sp). This is what Dave studies in his relentless pursuit of butterflies is the correlation of UV in insect mating activity and birds, hence feathers.

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WOW this is getting interesting.........BUD, i can't wait to see this fly. You guys are always blowin' my mind (or what little there is left of it, lol) with all the combined knowledge you poses. Great place to learn "stuff." ;) mark

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I have a Satin Bower bird study specimen. At first appearance the feathers look black and upon closer inspection, have a hint if indigo blue. When one looks at this bird it appears rather dull and unattractive with no special qualities, however under a black light and voila, the feathers really light up. I'm sure not all fish see into the ultraviolet range to the same degree. Probably fish like salmon and trout which live in clear water may have vision that sees farther into the UV range than say a catfish or carp. I bet these feathers (Satin Bower bird) tied on a hook would catch fish even though to us they seem rather drab. When I have some time I’ll view my other specimens with a black light and let you know how they react.

 

GSB

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