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suskiefisher

salmon fly hackle - help

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Is there any technique for getting the hackle on the fly body (orange parson for example) to stay pointing down and not out to the sides of the hook? When it is wrapped it sticks out in all directions. I pulled it down with my fingers which works somewhat. Any advice would be appreciated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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but spit on it and let is dry for about an hour.

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YO SUS, first of all you'll be much better off if you fold the hackle first.....either before you tye it in.....or as your wraping. I do both.....ah, BOUFF.. Take your feather and grip it by the tip with one hand, and then pull all the fibers down the opposite way from which they grow on the rachis. Get the fiber tips pointing down towards the butt of the stem, or the bottom of the feather. Then attache your hackle pliers to the stem to hold in the palm of your hand, (in my case i hold that in my left hand) and hold the tip of the feather in the opposite hand, (your fingers). Now some people fold up, and some fold down. I fold down.....it makes absolutely no difference which way you do it. Ken Sawada folds up.....you can see him do it in his videos mant times. The point is......your putting memory in the fibers. Training them to do what you want them to do.....the second most important thing in all of fly tying after thread control...........(MAKE the materials do what YOU want them to do.....NOT what nature might tell them to do), so that once the hackle is wrapped, the fibers already have "learned their lesson." Dig? Once you've folded the hackle and tyed it in.....continue to fold it as you wrap it to keep it "doing what you want it to do." Got it? When i say "fold as you wrap," i just mean keep stroking the fibers back and down, in the direction you want them to go. After the fly is finished.....you might want to give the hackle a graduate course in staying put. :D But spit is NOT nessessary and will mess your flies up if you over do it, so don't ever bother to chance that. Just tye it right in the first place. To fold, you just take your thumb and forfinger and (in my case) press the fibers down and back.....down and back.....down and back.....using the stem as a point of pressure. IF, you use to much pressuer you will rip the fibers off one side or both.....that's good. It teaches you what is enough pressure and what is to much. Just like breaking your thread is good for what it teaches you. Good luck. mark

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:D Hey JZ: Heres a little tip from Bill Chinn: Often after he would tie in the hackle and secure it forward, he would go back and with wet fingers (saliva) very forcefully rub the hackles back until they assumed the position! It really works.

Dave P. :)

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mark...well put

 

after tied onto the body , and after stroking the fibers rearward toward the back of the hook, you can also squeeze the butt ends of the hackle (along the stem) and the body of the fly...this just adds pressure to the part of the fibers that are folded...

 

any fibers that are on the top of the body that refuse to fold can be carefully pulled out or cut away

 

 

i suggest practicing on a bare hook

 

have fun

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Hey SuskieF:

 

This is a great topic. You've received some great advice and I thought I would piggy back a few of my own experiences..

 

Just as toilet paper is more resistant to holding a sharp crease or fold, as opposed to a piece of typing paper....soft webby hackles are less willing to be folded beforehand as opposed to some of the nice stiff necks. On the other hand....those webby feathers absorb water quicker and are more likely to clump...as opposed to crisp hackles.

 

I like em both but treat them differently when palmering or wrapping. I always fold webby hackle as I wrap and never moisten them beforehand....just the opposite of the necks

 

dg

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Sus, Bouff is the Jazz spelling of "both." :hyst: In that world there's a reason we use two ff's instead of th. :D It's like Norff or Souff..... of the Mason/Dixon. :lol: For further explanation PM me.

Right Ted, i left that part out.....but definatelty shoulda included that you do need to do that bit of extra work once your fly is completed. That little bit of added pressure really helps a lot. And you can't get that done until after the fly is finished. Just figgered that was pretty self evident.....but maybe not. mark..... B)

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Thanks for the info guys. Always a help as usual.

 

Sometimes it seems to me like the questions I post are kinda stupid. But hey, what the heck... That's what the forum's for and if I or someone else can gain from the question being answered then everybody wins.

 

 

 

Willow... PM is on the way.

 

 

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