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johnnyquest

Another question

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Alright guys, and ladies. Tonight i was throwing some poppers off my deck and managed a few gills. Which was fun, but i was messing around with my casting and trying to figure out how to add more distance.

 

I had been casting nearly overhand... but I found if i dropped to more of a 3/4 delivery i could add about 20 feet to my casts. I even impressed myself with my distance, and my accuracy was equivilant to how i previously had cast.

 

 

Just curious as to how everyone else casts..... btw i think part of the reason i am more succesfull casting 3/4 is that i pitched for 12+ years and always threw at about 3/4.

 

 

BTW, i finally figured out the allure of flydunking..... clean hands

innocent.gif

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QUOTE
BTW, i finally figured out the allure of flydunking..... clean hands

 

No more wormy fingers thumbup.gif

 

The way I learned was reading "Guide to Fly Fishing" by Cam Sigler. Took some time since all of my friends think Fly Fishing is for sissies and no one I know could show me but I kept at it anyway maybe due to stubborness. Now I'd rather not touch another type of fishing rod.

 

I do the standard 11 - 1 oclock cast but usually I lift the line and then tug it back for a quiet exit and then on the forstroke lay it down. This may sound silly but when I'm fishing it drives me nuts listening to people rip their fly line off the water. dunno.gif I try to wade and cast as quiet as possible so the fish, animals, and other fishermen never know I'm there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Guest

quest, you said you were casting off your dock, and you live in kalamazoo, what lake do you live on?

 

John

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I doubt that the full overhand vs 3/4 overhand is what added any distance to your cast. In my experiance, I get better distance when I get my timing right and if I can keep the rod movement between 10 and 1 O'clock.

 

I have a really nice St Croix 4wt Imperial rod. It casts like a dream. I say that comparing it to my 25 year old 6 wt fiberglass rod. Can't tell you what brand as the label as seriously worn off. That fiberglass rod is like a wet noodle compared to the Imperial. I find myself wanting to move it between 9 and 3 O'clock trying to get it to feel like the Imperial. But I find I can get better distance, even with the old rod, if I keep my movement between 10 and 1. When I guit fighting the older rod and stop trying to make it something it is not, I can get it to do a good job with the streamers and poppers that are too large for the 4wt (at least their too large when it is windy).

 

If you were pitching at 3/4 overhand, then this could be a good spot for you. You may have better control than full overhand. If you think about it, you may see that it is control and not angle of attack that makes the difference in distance.

 

One man's opinion. YMMV.

 

Ken S.

 

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Rider, I actually live in Augusta... on Sherman Lake. Less than 5 minutes from Augusta Creek.

 

I dunno, it just felt like i could load the rod better and feel the line behind me when i dropped down a little bit.

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Guest

Thats right you have told me that before, I forgot. It has been so cold and nasty lately, it seems like the gills and bass will never turn on. Do you own a float tube?

 

john

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Did you have a head wind? You might have been keeping the line under the wind with that lower cast. The real key to long casts is getting a tight loop. It's all related to line speed at the proper time. Too much power too soon and you'll get a bad loop and as a reward a neat little half-hitch in your tippet. blink.gif

You should find that throwing from the side like that will cause a curve at the end of your cast if you don't nail the timing perfectly. Getting a curved line at the end of the cast is less likely if you throw more overhand. Throwing from the side is usually put in the 'specialty cast' department.

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Yeah as a matter of fact i did have the wind in my face.

 

Rider, no float tube or boat yet. The neighbor lets me use her boat when ever i want. Even though i live on sherman... most of my fishing is done on a lake in Portage that has no public access. A great bluegill and pike lake, Lake Hill'n Brook. Ever heard of it?

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No , where the heck is that? If it has no access how do you get on it? I am always looking for a new bluegill spot. My favorite lake in kalmaazoo to fish you need a float tube for. IT is a private lake, but it borders state land, you can get to it after about a mile hike.

 

john

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I grew up less than a mile from that lake. I know a few of the property owners.... the lake allows no motors, and the only access is that you could put a boat in is off a little 2 track that you can't even see from the road. You used to not even be able to drop a boat in there, but a few years back some friends and i went in with shovels and made our own little incline.

http://www.michigan-sportsman.com/photopos...&cat=500&page=6

 

http://www.michigan-sportsman.com/photopos...k_bluegill2.jpg

 

These gills all went between 8-10 inches. And a few crappies that went between 10-13. It would be a difficult lake to flyfish i would imagine as the fish were all caught in 20+ feet of water and the fish were 6-10 feet deep. The top one is my roomate and the bottom one is my lil bro(who doesn't fish)

 

There are some pike in there too that go 45+, one of the property owners has one on his wall from that lake right around 45 inches.

 

Oh yeah, the lake is located near the 1-94 and 131 interchange. You can see one of the ponds it connects to from 131, just look East right after you merge from 94.

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Are you kidding, aren't those the lakes that are by black swan, swan creek I think it is called runs thru there? Where did you live? My dad builds houses for glas associates, that neighborhood borders that creek. I live off ninth street by I 94.

 

I would still use flies fishing that deep, with either a full sinking line, or flies on an ultralight spin rod, I am not that much of a flyfishing purist. We fish 20 foot deep with nymphs out on gull lake all the time for gills using ultralights.

 

 

john

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Yeah i lived right on the other side of Angling Road. Glas Associates built all of the houses in the Swan Creek neighborhood.... i used to fish right behind the house that Joe Glas owned. He had a pond that was stocked with bass and bluegill, and always let the local kids fish it. This lake is slightly farther East, but it does connect via that creek you are referring too. It connects to the lake by the Black Swan also.... but this lake is by far the deepest, even though it is not that big it gets to over 40 feet in a few spots.

 

I have access to a nice little 10 foot jon boat out there. We will have to get out there sometime.

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A 3/4 casting stroke will give you a wider range of motion than a more upright cast will. Your stance will also affect you range of motion. You probably added a foot or two to your casting arc, which translated into more distance. Add a double haul to that and you'll add another 20 feet.

 

 

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QUOTE (johnnyquest @ May 5 2004, 10:57 PM)
Double haul???? you lost me there.........

I'll try this and someone will correct me if I get it wrong.

 

Double Haul refers to a way to accelerate your line on the forward stroke to gain some distance. It is used when you have gotten as far as you can with your normal casting, but you want to go a bit farther. While you've got the line out to this point you want to cast past, you need to strip some excess line off the reel.

 

The move is done as your false casting. Get as much line moving back and forth as you can control. You want your striping hand up closes to the first striping guide on the rod. You draw back your rod and your the loop of your line straightens out behind you. You get ready to cast forward and drop the fly to the water. You feel the rod start to load as your loop finishes and the rod tip is drawn back. As you start to move the rod forward, you pull down on the line with the striping hand (remember, it is up near that first guide). By pulling down as the rod begins to move forward, you add a little extra volocity to the forward movement of the line. As this last cast moves forward out in front of you, it will fly farther than it did on previous false casts. That extra volocity keeps the line flying longer and farther.

 

I believe this is called the double haul because you are not only hauling down on the line as you lift it off the water to start your false cast, but you also haul down on it as you make that final forward cast. Perhaps the name comes from the fact that you are not only imparting forward movement to the line via the action of the rod, but also due to the hauling down on the line, pulling it forward from that flat out back position.

 

I'm sure if you or I or anyone pulled out a book, there is a better description of this technique. I tried to keep this simple yet complete. I'm sure some of those with more experiance than I can add some suggestions and polish that will help even more. Try this as is and then add polish. It is a starting point. See what it can do for you. It may take a few tries to see results.

 

Get your timing down first. If you do this final haul before the loop has truely straightened out, you could be getting into trouble. Once you work out the timing properly, think about seeing if you can pull that last haul faster than your first tries. The more acceleration you add to the line the more distance you may get.

 

It is most useful to those of us who fish ponds and lakes where distance can make a lot of difference. It is not so useful on smaller streams where sometimes you are working hard to properly place a very short cast.

 

More later,

Ken S.

 

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