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Monquarter

My first posting- #2 Popham

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post-13487-1200318042_thumb.jpgFirst I have to explain my latest project. I am in the process of tying a few featherwing flies for fishing purposes. While I have caught salmon on classic flies, they have all been taken on flies tied on eyed hooks. My goal for 2008 is to catch and release a salmon on a classic fly tied on a gut-eyed hook.

 

Hence the smallish nature of the fly.

 

My only deviation from the standard Pryce-Tannatt pattern is to replace the ostrich herl with dubbed black wool. This is done for the obvious reason of durability under fishing conditions. I promise to post a picture of any salmon caught on one of these flies (even if it is a 4" parr!). I have more flies to come off the vise this winter.

 

I also have some other flies to show you but on to my question to you. I am having great difficulty in taking CLEAR pictures of my flies- obvious in the Popham shot. What is the secret? Tripod? Macro setting?? Hiring professionals???

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Great Looking fly! I can't wait to see the fish off that one!

 

As for taking pictures... I am still trying to figure that one out myself :P My camera obviously doesn't like me... I use a tripod (Piece of Crap) and what I think is the macro setting on my camera. I live in a trailer and don't have good light. So it sucks rofl

 

Also what type of fish are those in the background??

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I would like a better picture, because from what i see it looks pretty darn good!!!

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Hi there, From what I am able to see of it, the fly looks fine.

 

However the photographic work, as you say need some help.

 

First of all what type of camera are you using ? Does it have a tripod screw underneath it ? and does it have a "macro" setting often shown as a flower head?

 

The are cameras and cameras, today however it's more down to what the person behind it does as to the result you get. If you handhold practice breathing out slowly just before and when you press the shutter. If you use a non- plain background, move it away an inch or so to avoid shadows and give some extra depth.

 

Tripods can vary greatly, a good one is worth its weight in gold. I use a Mannfrotto 015 with a parallel arm and a focusing stage (try ebay !) that type of set up will allow you to get millimeter precision of positioning of the camera and keep it rock solid. You can then use the cameras own self timer facility to avoid any vibration. Spend more on your tripod than you do on your next camera, that way you will see how good it can work.

 

If you then buy an s.l.r. camera, you can get a macro lense to go with it, I use nikon and there are ones in the range which I would not touch (d40 series, as they are not backwardly compatible, so lense choice is limited and expensive !) I have a d50, now discontinued but is a brilliant tool. D70s (later model) and D200 are also well worth looking at. Also independent macro lenses, I have a Sigma from an earlier camera which is fine. Take a look at Grahams photos on this forum in the realistic section and also in the photo section. Doubtless other makes of camera/tripod/lenses will work at least as well. Buy a few photo magazines for inspiration.

 

Hope that is of some help

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post-13487-1200318042_thumb.jpgFirst I have to explain my latest project. I am in the process of tying a few featherwing flies for fishing purposes. While I have caught salmon on classic flies, they have all been taken on flies tied on eyed hooks. My goal for 2008 is to catch and release a salmon on a classic fly tied on a gut-eyed hook.

 

Hence the smallish nature of the fly.

 

My only deviation from the standard Pryce-Tannatt pattern is to replace the ostrich herl with dubbed black wool. This is done for the obvious reason of durability under fishing conditions. I promise to post a picture of any salmon caught on one of these flies (even if it is a 4" parr!). I have more flies to come off the vise this winter.

 

I also have some other flies to show you but on to my question to you. I am having great difficulty in taking CLEAR pictures of my flies- obvious in the Popham shot. What is the secret? Tripod? Macro setting?? Hiring professionals???

 

It's a brave man that risks one of those nasty slimey fish things getting their teeth into that much Indian Crow :P

Nice work

Dave

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Hi Monquarter,

 

Firstly a big welcome, It's a shame the photo is a bit blur but even so you can still see an excellent tying of a Popham.

 

Well done...

 

All the best Davie

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What they all said.

 

I use the aperture preferred setting, macro setting, timer setting and tripod for my shots. Also, fill the viewfinder with as much of the fly/subject as possible and reduce the size of the file later.

 

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Hi and welcome. I blow up the picture of your fly and it looks awsome but its difficult to see the tiny details. :headbang: :headbang: I really like that you will let this fly swim, hopefully you get a big one :) I got salmon on three of my flies with silkgut last year, EXTREMLY FUN :yahoo: Tip about taking picture. Take one fly with you to a pro, let him take as good pic he can with your camerea in a room with as much light you have in your home, and ask him to write down and show you the settings and use em :)

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Welcome!

 

My advice for taking good pictures is to buy your wife a $650 Nikon camera with a $230 flash and take lots of pictures on all the different settings and pick one to edit to put on the forum. :) (This would be so much funnier if there weren't some grain of truth in it.)

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