Jump to content
Fly Tying
QCflies

mounting Peacock sword-Jock Scott

Recommended Posts

This is my first post so forgive me if it's in the wrong place. I am working on my 3rd attempt at a Jock Scott. Apart from the ordinary difficulties a relative novice like myself would have one component of this pattern (and others) that has proven most frustrating is mounting the Peacock sword.

 

On my first 2 trials I was driven to near madness trying to get the sword to mount and lay in a correct fashion. The "barbs" would twist and contort in very unfriendly ways. Either shooting off to the side, rolling inverted with the curve of the wing, etc. Does anyone have suggestions on a method for making this beautiful feather lay properly? In fact on my second trial the sword was left out all together as they got the best of me.

 

Next issue with the above mentioned feathers is; where in the heck are they dressed on the Jock Scott? I've seen versions where they lay atop the underwing (getting lost as the rest of the fly is finished), or along side the main wing, or even atop the roof (most visible). I know that as with most issues like this there's room for interpretation. java script:emoticon(':dunno:', 'smid_13')

:dunno:

 

I look forward to your guidance on this and most likely many other issues in the future.

 

Thanks,

Doug Gualtieri

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are most definitely in the right place with a question about Salmon flies. You will find the group of guys here to be very knowledgeable about these flies and more than willing to help answer any questions you might have.

 

As far as the question about the mounting location of the Peacock Sword, I prefer it along the top as you have suggested. As far as making this stuff behave, try to get a piece that most closely conforms to the shape that you will mount it and from there on you have my best wishes for luck. There are certainly others here who will have much better advice on Peacock Sword and I look forward to seeing how they treat this feather.

 

Welcome, don't be a stranger and don't touch Ronn's apple fritters. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Matt,

Thanks for the tip, or at least the offer of good luck. As far as Ron's Apple fritters go, I'll try my best. Thought they are my favorite breakfast pastry.

 

Hopefully after work tonight I'll have nicely peacock sworded Jock Scott to share with you all.

 

Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I`m with Matt, although sometimes I go for each side of the underwing. but like Matt says try and pick one the right shape then pray a lot .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks bobfly and Matt. Whenever i'm tying and dealing with any materials and the minutia that goes with it I think of the forefathers and how the heck they managed sans vise and bobbins.

 

I'll let you know how it turned out.

 

Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The biggest key for me is Saliva. Are you putting them under or over the roof? Getcha a good gob of spit on your fingers and shellac them babies down on the wing. I dip a lot of copenhagen, so maybe the mollases in the snuff helps. :o :) Good luck!! -Jamie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

heres the hokus pokus part of manipulating peacock sword feathers. you can stroke the feather against an edge, softly at first and look at it, use very little pressure until you get the angle your trying to capture, you can apply more pressure as needed stoking it across a sharp edge, preferably wood. you can make a peacock sword feather look like a corkscrew if youd like doing this, with a little practice you can easily remove curve or add more to any specific area of the sword feather making it conform perfectly with the curvature of the feather or wing your laying it on or over. it's really simple once you do it.

 

 

Bud

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some more good stuff, not so sure about the chewing tobacco bit. I don't need another habit in my life, good beer and feathers are enough. I will try the pressure aspect.

 

What about when I actually tie them in? The tend to roll as the thread flattens the feather. That's the real tricky part for me.

 

I will lay them under the roof most likely as roofing is hard enough I don't want to monkey with the peacock sword on top of the roof.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another trick to using sword is to leave the barbs attached to the stem until after they are tied in. Just cut off the number of barbs you want (for a Jock Scott say 3 or 4) and leave them attached to the rachis. This keeps them sort of inline while tying them in. You can still manipulate the curve, as mentioned above, while the barbs are attached.

 

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Leaving them on the rachis sounds like an effective theory. I'll give it a go. I've been delaying completing the fly as I field all the suggestions here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The "leaving the barbs attached to the rachis" technique is very effective at keeping the barbs on a single plane, stacked one atop the other. Here's a classic wet fly, the Magalloway, that I tied using that technique:

 

post-3247-1200532899_thumb.jpg

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John that's a real beauty. OK now I'm convinced, ready to finish this one off. Thanks everyone! :yahoo:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the jock scott is a built wing with lots of stuff on it...every tyer has a different eye so where the sword is tied in and how much is seen is your discretion...but most fo the antiques that i've seen have the sword tied in along with the white tippped turkey underwing with just a portion of it showing from under the outer sheaths

 

don't be afraid to show more or tie in somewhere else

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...