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Any tips on mounting horns welcome..

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O.K. For almost everyone here this is an aspect that probably doesn't need clarification. But I seem to be having random difficulties when mounting horns on my flies.

 

1. position and subsequent angle from the head

2. technique for tying them in to prevent splaying out from the wing, thread wraps (#), and trimming so when head is finished they don't pop out even more

3. Anything else that could be of assistance.

 

I find that sometimes they go on just fine, and upon finishing the head they shift either up and down or pop out as mentioned above. :dunno: :wallbash: :dunno: :wallbash: :dunno:

 

Any help on this matter will be greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks,

Doug

 

 

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it sounds like a thread tension problem...an ..old saying...one good wrap is better than whatever

 

enough tension should keep them from slipping...try only one wrap of thread per fiber both with the same is better...that is place the near side horn on first then with the same wrap place the far side...give it one or two additonal firm wraps then adjust the angle...now do the whip finish over those wraps

 

horns can shift because they are tied in by the smallest of sections,

 

as for the splaying...that is normally caused by a bump behind the tie in point.. possibly to many wraps of thread on the previous operation...in this case the crest,...what size thread do you use? sometimes the really fine stuff is misused...

 

minor splaying can also be caused by using a right horn on the left side etc...or upside down easy to do this because your using onlt 1 fiber

 

 

 

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I'd watch Mike Radencich's video again. The technique of a bend just behind the horn's tie in point springs the horns toward the centerline of the fly., and minimal wraps should be necessary to hold it in place. Your head formation needs to avoid disturbing the horns, and if they are only held with a few wraps you might have trouble. One way to avoid this is to form your head, then tie on the horns (with only a couple of wraps, with thread untwisted), then varnish the head.

 

One other thing, make sure that you are using the correct barb length for a given size fly. If you trim the base of a barb of macaw because it is too long, you are trimming out the stoutest portion of the barb. Note also that the longer the horn fiber, the more likely it is to droop, and Scarlet Macaw seems almost as limp as a wet noodle. That is why you see so many patterns with crossed horns somewhere about 3/4 down the wing to add structure to a very weak element.

 

Drooping horns are no fun at all, especially if you have framed the fly...

 

Cheers,

 

dave white aka "Swill Gordon"

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"one good wrap is better than whatever"..... :hyst: .........GREAT stuff Ted..............thass why you my hero. :thumbsup: :D :P ;) mark..... B)

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