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Foersterhunter

one man pontoons

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I have to agree with jerry's statements on the hard hull-vs-inflatable hull boats,and one other thing to consider is the hobie style boats being a hard tube design make them alot harder to transport.

 

great for ponds and lakes but i would suggest the inflatable design myself for rivers.

 

SD

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I tried ours out Sunday and loved it. I can't really compare it to other pontoon's since that was my first float on a pontoon. There is plenty of pockets for storage and it handled with ease. However, I didn't care for the anchor system and we are probably going to revamp it. It seems like more of a hassle than anything.

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Sue won't be able to help out much on the subject unless she takes John to the anchor outlet, lmao! I can see it now, the rear end of the truck loaded down with anchors in every shape and size. The two of them at an outlet store could be a deadly combo. tongue.gif ph34r.gif help.gif

 

I'll be sure to post on what we come up with. biggrin.gif He's working on finishing up the outside of the drift boat this weekend since the rivers are so high.

 

Sarah wink.gif

 

 

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When you plan to setup the anchor system, let me know. Have a couple ways for you to do it. I've built hundreds of these systems for local pontooners. Just depends on how you plan to attach it (whether it be permanent, or removable without leaving holes). Let me know. Pretty easy, and the most expensive part is the forward release/cleat (which is a pretty cool system).

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Hey John or Sarah

 

Did that Boat you guys bought at Sams clucb come with a air pump? My buddy is thinking about getting one, and was wondering.

 

Thanks!

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No air pump Scott.

It's easy to fill with a compressor. But, what happens if it loses pressure on the river? That's the bad part.

 

You can buy a pump at REI for $18.00. I may have to do that.

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Make sure you get that pump! I had one chamber blow out on one of my pontoons. That would of been a long walk back to a vehicle without the pump to fully inflate the other bladder.

 

Mike

 

 

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I will Mike, thanks!

 

Steelheader, what's your suggestion for the anchor system? You have me curious.

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Well, it's rather easy, and quick to setup.

 

First, buy a rope/pulley/cleat. I wish I knew the name of it. I can't find mine anywhere. Want to say it's made by attwood. But you can buy at any sporting goods or hardware store. Is made to hang from ceiling, or anywhere. The rope strings through the holder and the pulley has a cleat system built in. You can pull as much as you want, and you hear it click like a ratchet. That way, no matter what, the rope is secure. No worrying about accidental dropping and losing anchor (or boat if it grabs). They have various sizes, 3/8", 1/2", etc. Buy the one for your line diameter. Next, buy 2-3 pulleys. Stainless is prefered, but not necessary. Those will be your runner pulleys and your rear anchor mount.

 

Ok, now there are two ways to install. Here's how you'd do a permanent mount. Buy Eye ring bolts (O bolts) with threads JUST long enough to go through your frame and attach a locking nut. No more. I have a heavy bench vise I'm able to do this easy with. Then, slide all the pulleys and pully/ratchet into the O ring and close it back up. It will not come apart again (if you buy the heavier duty Eye bolts). Now, WITH PONTOONS OFF, drill the holes where you plan to put the pulleys. I say take the pontoons off because I told a guy how to do this, and he didn't. Well, cost him repairs on his tubes. LOL. He knew better, but thought he would be careful enough. LOL. Before you drill, have some people (or use clamps) to make sure that there is no obstruction with the rope. All boat frames are built different, so your configuration vs. what I've used on my boats would be different. Then, of course, you want that last pulley OFF CENTER in the back of the boat. DO NOT put it dead center (unless you're using a roller bracket like a driftboat uses). Why I say this, is with a hanging rear pulley as your anchor mount, the rope WILL NOT come out dead center. There will be strain on the pull, and will cause your anchor to be off center. Not that big of a deal, but these boats pull enough on anchor, no use adding anymore friction in the water.

 

Now, if you don't want to drill. This may sound odd, but it WORKS! Buy some heavy duty zip ties. Think you'll have to go to an industrial machine type shop. Don't get the ones you see at most stores. In fact, I have some with steel cables inside the plastic zip ties. You want a fairly heavy duty tie. If I still have some, would even send you some (I'll have to look). Simply find where you want to install. Has to be in an area where they will stay still (say near/on an oar tower, near the bend of a frame between two welds, etc). Take these heavy duty zip ties and do 2-3 wraps around the frame AND through the eye of the pulley. Sounds odd. But I've used this on areas of my big whitewater frame that I didn't want drilled and adding the anchor system that way (was my whitewater frame, didn't want to add holes to it). I used it that way for 4 years pulling a 40# anchor and never had to replace a ziptie. They held up great. Just has to be a heavy duty ziptie.

 

Hope that helps. Wish I had pictures, but never took up close pics. But I will find out the name of that pulley cleat for you. It's also used for hunting (hanging deer in camps, etc). I've seen them all over. If I have to, will head to local sporting goods store and get the name. In process of getting a new frame for one of my catarafts, so pulled all my goodies off the other frame. LOL. Wanted my anchor system. So have that cleat in a box somewhere. But that cleat is the ONLY way to go. So easy to pull up, and so easy to release. Plus, when you let go of that rope, it's not going anywhere.

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Thanks Steelheader, I'll do just that and I WILL take the pontoons off before I drill. LOL

And, thanks for taking the time to explain it. I understand exactly what you're saying.

 

 

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Ok, glad you understood. LOL. I know what I want to say most of the time, but not sure if it translates correctly on the screen. biggrin.gif Do you know that forward release cleat I'm talking about? If not, I will find the name for you. Not a marine product (but can be used for that though).

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I've recently done a lot of research on one man pontoon boats and finally decided on one. Ordered a Water Skeeter River Tamer II. I'm sure any of them will do the job but I like the features included. Like Steelheader69, it looks like the anchor system cold be improved. One question, for those of you that have pontoon boats; do you find that you have to deflate regularly on hot days? and do you carry your pump with you?

Thanks

 

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Steelheader,

I don't know the name, but I understand the concept. Not sure where I'll find one just yet, but the search is on.

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I'll find the name. In fact, if you want, I can pick one up for you if you wanted to pay the shipping back. Just would need to know what size diameter. I will get the name of it tomorrow for you. I'm heading down that way where I can buy them. Just to save you shipping.

 

Ok, onto boats. Yes, you should ALWAYS have a repair kit and pump on hand. When the weather changes, so will the air density in your tubes. I've fished right when the seasons change out on the coast. Had one day where it was cold. In the morning, I always pump the tubes rock hard (tubes ALWAYS should be rock hard, if there is play they can puncture easier on an obstruction). Then, as the day changes, I will adjust the tubes. Well, in an hour or two it got so cold it started snowing (this was April here on coast, so a rarity) and my tubes started getting soft. So pulled off and pumped them up to rock hard again. By the time I got off the river, was releasing air again. Had warmed up. Especially if you have lower end tubes (ones with a bladder and a stitched shell) you REALLY want to keep an eye on your tubes. Have had (first hand) and seen others who have had their boats split apart. Had no idea (and I was keeping my eyes on tubes, but had fish on so wasn't paying attention for an hour or two lol) and next thing I know I hear "pop pop pop". Got the tubes deflated before a total blow out. But others weren't so lucky.

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