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deeky

What is this in my house?

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Anyone able to help me out? I know a lot of them, but this branch of the world stumps me. Thanks in advance for the help.

 

Top View:

post-3964-1209608256_thumb.jpg

 

Side View:

post-3964-1209608287_thumb.jpg

 

It does have two antenae, but one is folded back along the body.

 

Thanks.

 

Deeky

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We have alot of these at our house as well. Try a google image search for "lacewing."

 

JP

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We always called them lace-wing caddis. I always wondered if they really are a type of caddis??? If any-one finds an answer to that i would be greatful.

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Lacewings are in a different Order (Neuroptera) of insects than caddis flies (Tricoptera). I don't believe that any of the lacewing species are aquatic.

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That's what I was looking for. Thanks for the help.

 

Deeky

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I Also thank you guys...Very interesting read on that link. It answers a missconception that was handed to me so long ago i forget. Thanks.

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Regarding not being any Neuroptera being aquatic, this is from my web page on aquatic Neuroptera (Aquatic Insects of Michigan):

 

Although Neuroptera is a sizable insect order of about 5000 species, only two families - Nevrorthidae (considered a "basal" family of Neuroptera (Aspöck et al. 2001)) and Sisyridae - have become adapted to an aquatic life phase. Only Sisyridae is found in the Nearctic, and in our area. There are 3 species in 2 genera recorded in Michigan.

 

Adults lay eggs on vegetation overlying an aquatic body containing freshwater sponges, upon which spongillafly larvae feed by using long stylet mouthparts to pierce and suck out contents. Like Megaloptera, larvae crawl out of the waterbody to create a pupal chamber, and after about 1-2 weeks the adult uses special mouthparts to emerge. Adults usually live about several weeks. More information on biology and ecology: Identification of Michigan Sisyridae.

 

Cheers, Ethan

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