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flyfisher46

Fly tying tools

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Have decided to go with getting my fly tying tools and supplies seperate. I was wondering what I need besides a vice and scissors. Also what would be a good vice to start out with?

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A bobbin for holding thread, I recommend a ceramic tube on it, but they are more expensive. A dubbing needle, this can be as simple as a pin put into a cork, or bit of wood. Hackle pliers or a electronic micro grabber hook for winding hackles. Head Cement or hard as nails clear nail polish, A whip finisher such as a Matareli brand is one of the easiest to learn on. A material spring on your vice for holding thread, or body materials that are tied in, but not in use just yet, out of your way. A good place to look at them all in one place is http://www.feather-craft.com/wecs.php?stor...w&target=12.

 

Anymore questions, just post. Cheers Futzer.

 

Oh, and if you have a local fly shop, they will be more than happy to help and are a good place for questions, tying classes, or trying several vices before you buy.

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Thank you, Taking a fly tying class on feb 7th. Hopefully I'll get some ideas. Any recomendations on vices? I see some are pedestal and some are clamps. Which type would you recomend?

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Thank you, Taking a fly tying class on feb 7th. Hopefully I'll get some ideas. Any recomendations on vices? I see some are pedestal and some are clamps. Which type would you recomend?

 

The best advice that I can give you is to find a shop that will let you tie on several. Many will say buy an inexpensive one and use it until you develop your skills and then replace it. I think that doing a little research, and tying on as many as you can, then buying the best you can afford with the features you want in the long run is a better, more fugal purchase. There are several very long and very informative posts under the tying bench about which vice each of us uses. Look into a rotary design as that allows you to look at all sides of your fly. Really though it is as user specialized as buying a car, what I like others just hate and vica versa. Feel free as you narrow down your likes to post and get comments, they may just be valuable.

 

Cheers, Futzer.

 

I personally perfer clamps and the Dynaking company, but they are higher end and I have tied as many as 1200 dozen flies in one year professionally. There are many fine choices out there.

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Hopefully I'll be able to narrow it down and the local shop will let me try out a few and give me good advice on which one to buy. Thats a lot of flies tied

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Add a Whip finisher it is really helpful for tying small flies I never used one until I got one this Christmas they really help and if you are taking a course some one can show you how to do it I have a friend who has been tying for years and most of the books did not tell well enough how to use it but the Benchside Introduction to fly tying and it has some real good pictures on how to use it! That is how I learned

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My tool of choice and cant live with out. a bodkin. simple yet its sort of a multi tool. Could only find a good descritpion on cabelas page. http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/template...&hasJS=true

 

Since I never learned the art of the whip tool (ie got frustrated and literally threw it out the shop window) i use the bodkin to tie a few clove hitches. dont laugh..lol...it works!

 

Oh one other thing..get a good bobbin!!! I have tried to use the El Bargin ones. Spend the few extra dollors and get a good one. the El Bargain one ended up near my whip finisher. I still have the Original one that I purchased almost 30 years ago.

Happy Tying!

lytle

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I have not been tying too long, about a year and a little more. I have a fairly sparse set of tools, but they work for me.

I have up graded to a Renzetti Traveler. I have a pair of cheap scissors for material, a pretty good pair for thread, a whip finisher (learn to use this), a bodkin, a couple of bobbins (get ceramic), and I recently upgraded to a pair of 360 degree hackle pliers, and a bobbin threader.

I make this work for me, but will be adding a few things this year, just more of the bobbins and maybe a really nice pair of scissors.

You dont need a lot to get started, tool wise. Good luck.

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on your vise selection, whether clamp or pedestal. That depends largely on the location that you will tie. I prefer the clamp because for larger flies you can apply more force (spinning deer hair, etc.), but that necessitates clamping to your table which may scratch the table. If you are moving around, a pedestal is probably better. (and you can also clamp the pedestal to the table).

 

I use renzetti, and have both the clamp and the pedestal.

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Thank you, Taking a fly tying class on Feb 7th. Hopefully I'll get some ideas. Any recommendations on vices? I see some are pedestal and some are clamps. Which type would you recommend?

Taking a formal class is your best bet for learning quickly and getting the many questions you will have answered. If the school is through a fly shop they will often let you try various vises while in the class. Trying before buying is your best bet. Remember most tier end up buying a different vise as they learn more. Your skills get refined, you understand more your needs for the tying you do, etc... A lot of tiers end up with multiple vises for certain classes of flies.

 

Even if you asked other students in the class to try their vise it will give you more hands on info which will help you make a wiser choice.

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First, I applaud you for taking a class to get started. A lot of us are "self-taught", bad habits and all. You're getting off to a good start.

As for the different brands of vises, I would say to avoid the really cheap ones, you generaly get what you pay for. There are a lot of good vises out there, anywhere from $80 and up. Ive been tying for quite a while (40+ years) and have tried a lot of different makes and styles of vise.

Find a reasonably priced rotory vise and go from there. Clamp or pedistal? As said before, really a matter of personal preference, most pedistal vises use a heavy enough base to keep them from moving around on the bench. I have a permanent tying desk and use a clamp type, but have used a pedistal and had no problems.

Most vise stems are a standard diameter, and you can always buy a pedistal (or clamp) later if you want.

Good luck, and most of all have fun with it.

 

 

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Thank you for the advice, Hoping taking a class is a good way to start. I have started reading the Orvis guide to fly tying. Hoping that helps a little. I think I will be going with a vise that clamps on to a table. Making room in our bedroom to tie flies.

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