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FishyboY

Epoxy on Bass Poppers?

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I use preformed hard foam popper heads and also use preformed cork poppers when I want to sew rubber legs through the head instead of lashing them to the hook shank. You have to be careful with cork as it easily splits. The smaller the head, the more easily it splits.

 

Elmer's Carpenter's Wood Filler can be used to fill in pits in cork and and the slots of foam poppers if you aren't filling the slot with epoxy.

 

Rob:

 

If you double haul a popper hard against a cliff face, the whole popper head may well explode and not just crack the epoxy. It happened to one of mine when I bounced it hard against a pier.

 

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Someone was asking about hooks. There's other hooks around that are "bendable". I don't like most hump shanks that are around. Here's a Lazer 3/0 that was bent from worm hooks....Kinda big for casting. #1, 1/0 used mostly

big_bug.jpg

 

bugsguards.jpg

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In case anyone is looking for some Delta Ceramcoat paint, Michael's is having their annual stock up sale. I picked up a bunch yesterday for $0.88 per 2oz bottle. That's a little less than half of their normal price.

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This is the most complete popper discussion I've ever seen. Great variety of techniques and styles up here. Absolutely amazing stuff... thanks everyone!

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and if you don't have a rotary drier?

 

I have been epoxy coating all of my foam poppers, using only my rotary vise, and 5-minute epoxy. A couple of turns and then you can hang them up (I usally use the little bobbin arm on my vice) for a few and they are good to go.

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and if you don't have a rotary drier?

 

I have been epoxy coating all of my foam poppers, using only my rotary vise, and 5-minute epoxy. A couple of turns and then you can hang them up (I usally use the little bobbin arm on my vice) for a few and they are good to go.

 

 

Another very accomplished tier I know made a device from pieces of board to which he has affixed alligator clips for the epoxied flies. The device is turned onto different sides to avoid the epoxy pooling until it sets. Works with either 5 minute or 30 minute, only you will be turning longer with the 30 minute.

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Do not use isopropyl rubbing alcohol, as it's got water in it & it will make the epoxy milky looking.

 

Tidewaterfly:

 

I sure am thankful that my poppers and the rods I have built have never learned to read; or I might have to re-coat them with epoxy! For at least 20 years now I have, and still do, dilute both the 5 minute and 30 minute "hard" epoxies (Devcon, etc,), as well as the "soft" epoxies (Flex-Coat, etc.) with 70% isopropyl alcohol. I have yet to have a batch turn milky, as is often claimed. Moreover, ethyl alcohol (denatured alcohol, available as you dscribe) would be expected to be 5% water; plus it will have various other chemicals in it to "denature" it, which may include benzine, petroleum distillates, or other organic compounds. These chemicals are added for two reasons: 1) the ATF alcohol tax does not have to be paid; and, 2) it definitely discourages one from drinking it!

 

One can use equal parts of mixed epoxy and alcohol, i.e., a 1:1 mix. The amount of alcohol used is a function of how thin you want it. When applying the first coat of Flex-Coat to rod wraps, I want it water thin so that it will completely penetrate the wraps and saturate them (1:1:1). The second coat may be equally as thin. For coating bugs, I typically use equal parts of hardener, resin, and alcohol, i.e., a 1:1:1 mix.

 

Because of a unique chemical bond between ethyl alcohol and water, distillation can yield a maximum of 95% (180 Proof) alcohol; the remaining 5% being water. By adding benzine, or one of several other organic chemicals to the raw alcohol, this bond can be broken to yield Absolute Ethanol (100% or 200 Proof), which may, in fact have a minuscule amount of the benzine, etc., in it.

 

My personal experience is that the water-in-alcohol-turning-epoxy-milky claims are a myth.

 

Cheers,

perchjerker

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I also wanted to add that I have had good sucess with adding acylic paint to epoxy . It's nice when you want to add some colored bumps to your popper to give it some texture.

Fred

 

 

Fred:

 

I have had excellent results coloring epoxy with Testors model paints. I also add glitter of various sizes and colors to epoxy for some interesting results.

 

With respect to air bubbles, my rod-building mentor, a very prominent local custom rod builder, demonstrated a very simple and effective way of getting rid of them: simply hold the offending area in front of your mouth and exhale across it. His contention was that it is both the warmth and the CO2 that does the trick. Has always worked for me.

 

Cheers,

perchjerker

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Do not use isopropyl rubbing alcohol, as it's got water in it & it will make the epoxy milky looking.

 

Tidewaterfly:

 

I sure am thankful that my poppers and the rods I have built have never learned to read; or I might have to re-coat them with epoxy! For at least 20 years now I have, and still do, dilute both the 5 minute and 30 minute "hard" epoxies (Devcon, etc,), as well as the "soft" epoxies (Flex-Coat, etc.) with 70% isopropyl alcohol. I have yet to have a batch turn milky, as is often claimed. Moreover, ethyl alcohol (denatured alcohol, available as you dscribe) would be expected to be 5% water; plus it will have various other chemicals in it to "denature" it, which may include benzine, petroleum distillates, or other organic compounds. These chemicals are added for two reasons: 1) the ATF alcohol tax does not have to be paid; and, 2) it definitely discourages one from drinking it!

 

One can use equal parts of mixed epoxy and alcohol, i.e., a 1:1 mix. The amount of alcohol used is a function of how thin you want it. When applying the first coat of Flex-Coat to rod wraps, I want it water thin so that it will completely penetrate the wraps and saturate them (1:1:1). The second coat may be equally as thin. For coating bugs, I typically use equal parts of hardener, resin, and alcohol, i.e., a 1:1:1 mix.

 

Because of a unique chemical bond between ethyl alcohol and water, distillation can yield a maximum of 95% (180 Proof) alcohol; the remaining 5% being water. By adding benzine, or one of several other organic chemicals to the raw alcohol, this bond can be broken to yield Absolute Ethanol (100% or 200 Proof), which may, in fact have a minuscule amount of the benzine, etc., in it.

 

My personal experience is that the water-in-alcohol-turning-epoxy-milky claims are a myth.

 

Cheers,

perchjerker

 

 

Please tell us how many poppers you are able to epoxy on average with one batch of five minute and also how many with a batch of 30 minute epoxy.

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Please tell us how many poppers you are able to epoxy on average with one batch of five minute and also how many with a batch of 30 minute epoxy.

 

 

Let me clarify an apparently misleading statement in my earlier post. I use only 30 minute (2 Ton) epoxy for coating my bass bugs. Therefore, I cannot answer the first part of the question. I use the five minute for other applications. With respect to the second part, it is a function of how big the bugs are, and I use it only on my balsa bodied bugs, as I do not paint my foam bugs, which I cut and make from Fun Foam. The bigger they are, the faster it seems to go (more per unit of time) as there is very little "lost time" due to handling"; i.e., not as many to put on the drying wheel, or pick up and handle. My largest are tied on 1/0 Mustad #79580 hooks and have bodies right at 2 inches long and up to about 1/2 inch in diameter at the head. On a good day, I can do 15-20 before the epoxy gets too thick to work with. This includes putting them on my drier. On a normal day, I can do 12-15 in the same time period.

 

As I make them for my own use, "time-is-money" is not a concern. I am of the opinion that by changing the method of putting them on my drier, I could speed the process by possibly 3-5, maybe more, in the same time period. I simply impale them to my foam drier wheels by pushing the point into the foam, which requires turning it off and then back on. If I were to solder large needles to the butt end of alligator clips, grasp the hook, bend or eye, with the alligator clip and use it as a "handle" while applying the epoxy, then I should be able to just push the needle into the side of the wheel without having to stop the drier, saving some time.

 

I will take photos of some of my "bugs" and post later. I just got of a nine-day jury trial at 4:40 yesterday, and being a widower, my house is a mess. I am trying to play catch-up! Have four days worth of papers that haven't even been looked at!

 

Perchjerker

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Perchjerker

 

I quite understand about the size of the popper changing the numbers which can be done in a batch. I've only been using straight 30 minute epoxy. All I can do is 4-5.

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Perchjerker

 

I quite understand about the size of the popper changing the numbers which can be done in a batch. I've only been using straight 30 minute epoxy. All I can do is 4-5.

 

 

I think the clue to the difference to your number and mine lies in the fact that you do not thin the epoxy. I find that if I thin it 1:1:1 with rubbing alcohol, which results in a consistency comparable to Testors model pain, it goes on a whole lot faster. In fact, thinned this way, you should be able to successfully dip them. However, to do so would result in excessive waste of epoxy, IMO. I use a 1/4 inch wide, relatively flat, fine bristled, inexpensive artist's brush, and it goes on very rapidly. They do not have tails on them at this point; therefore, I do not have to worry about getting the epoxy in a tail. Also,I hold them between the thumb and index finger of my off hand, rather than with haemostats, pliers, etc., to minimize "operations". The most time-consuming part is the stopping of the drier, inserting the point of the hook and making certain that the bottom of the bug clears the top of the drier wheel, that the point of the hook is firmly enough inserted that it will not let the body flop side to side as the wheel turns.

 

I dare say that your production rate is as good as what I would have if I did not thin the epoxy. With the thinned, I do not have to worry about bubbles, which can be an aggravation with the "straight stuff", and it really flows on, rather than having to be "forced" on. I would encourage you to thin it with 70% rubbing (isopropyl) alcohol and see for yourself what a difference it makes.

 

I hope this will enable you to increase the number of bugs you can do with a batch of epoxy.

 

perchjerker

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New here but wanted to share this info, Bugs &Poppers #1 Tennessee Valley Fly Fishers, Bugs & Poppers #2, Fly Fishing Quarterly Fall 1989, the 1st 2 are booklets with photos and tips on making balsa plugs and painting and epoxy coating by Walt Holman, really great info and diagrams, tried to send photos of covers unsuccessfully, the club address is P.O. Box 16006, 5000 Whitesburg Dr, SE, Huntsville, Alabama 35802, this is info from the 80s so May have changed FFF club member, have not made bugs in years but these are Great Bugs

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FYI, Mr Holman used various size dowels for eyes, on balsa first dip in white gueso (spelling) used by artist before painting, after installing hook use needle nose pliers an just dip in gueso and hang by stretched wire, on the eyes after bug is painted dip the largest dowel in gueso and touch bug, the gueso helps hold the paint, then the next size dowel in paint color of choice by doing this you can make a 3 colored eye, after paint dries apply defcon epoxy by rolling it on with toothpicks, We also just dipped the gueso coated bug into paint no brushing, this probably is totally confusing and I apologize, just wanted to share the name of booklets and few tips, if you cannot get the booklets will be glad to post pictures if not copyright

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I use Liquid Fusion with good results. There was a study on here somewhere showing that it held up as well as epoxy. Going to try some acrylic glaze from art supply to compare the glossiness.

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