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Carlin

FTOTY Bamboo Rod

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Would you slow down your making me look bad blink.gif

 

Ken cool.gif

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Carl,

 

You do nice work. What material is the Wagner splicing block made from? I have been think of trying some nodeless rods. I have a bunch of culm cut off from making short small stream rods that would be good to try it out on. I'm looking forward to seeing the rest of your process.

 

Tight lines,

 

Pete

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After finishing planing the strips for the butt section, I swapped out the blade of my non-grooved plane with a newly sharpened one, and started work on the tip strips. The procedure is the same as the butt, but the tip strips are much, much finer.

user posted image

 

For comparison, the metal tip of a .5mm mechanical pencil is about .036" in diameter.

user posted image

 

Each strip for the tip section must be planed down to .033" for this particular rod configuration (see taper chart on page 1 of this thread). Remember they also must be kept at a perfect equalateral triangle! Here is a cut off section of one of the tip strips laying next to a piece of .5mm lead. The smallest tip section that I've done so far was for my 3wt which had a tip diameter of .050", or a strip diameter of .025"!

user posted image

 

Anyway, once the strips are finished, I tape them into the ready to be glued rod sections.

user posted image

 

After getting the binder setup, and laying down wax paper on the work bench (aka 2x10), I carefully slice the tape holding the strips and open them flat. Before spreading the glue I lightly sand the apex of the strips to make sure they will all settle together in a clean hexagon shape. Next it's a simple matter of evenly spreading the glue using a cheap toothbrush, and then into the binder.

user posted image

 

For this rod I'm using off-the-shelf Titebond III (if you ever want to get into a heated discussion with a rod maker, start talking about glues!). Titebond III has a working time of about 7 minutes according to the bottle, but I find that it's really about 5. That means that I have to spread the glue, roll the sections back up, run it through the binder, clean and straighten the sections all in 5 minutes or less. And, if I were to mess up, there is no going back - so I really try not to mess up!

 

Here is the binder that I'm using. It is a 4-string binder made by Tim Preusch. The 4 strings allow the rod to be bound with no torque on the rod, as the pressure from each string is countered by another. Using a foot pedal, I can completely bind a section in about 30 seconds. I have bound by hand, and it works great, but it takes about 5 minutes and is quite messy. Needless to say, the binder is much easier.

user posted image

 

Once a section is bound, I spend a minute or two wiping off the excess glue, and straightening the section. The roller you can see in the image above is run over each side of the hexagonal rod section to help settle the strips and straighten the section.

 

The rod sections are then hung to cure in my drying cabinet (aka closet).

user posted image

 

The rod sections will be ready for sanding in 24 hours, but since I'll be out of town until Sunday, it'll have to wait until then. When the sections are sanded down, we'll really be able to see how the rod is shaping up!!

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QUOTE
Would you slow down your making me look bad blink.gif

 

I'm usually not this fast Ken! wink.gif

 

QUOTE
You do nice work. What material is the Wagner splicing block made from? I have been thinking of trying some nodeless rods. I have a bunch of culm cut off from making short small stream rods that would be good to try it out on.

 

Thanks Pete - I appreciate that! The Wagner splicing block is made of a densely compacted particle board of some sorts. The main advantage to it is that no tools are needed to clamp the strips (hex key, vice, etc.), you tighten using 2 knobs. It was originally designed so that you could use a table saw and then a router to cut the splices, but I do them by hand. Jeff says you can cut a splice in 15 seconds, which is probably true if you are using power tools. It takes me about a minute of planing per splice.

 

The only problem that I have with the Wagner block, is you have to keep the threads that hold the block together VERY clean, otherwise you'll end up stripping out the bolts. It's an easy enough fix - I've done it 4 times - but an annoyance nonetheless. I'm planning a modification to fix the problem when I get some spare time.

 

Golden Witch has a splicing block made of aluminum that uses hex sex bolts (say that 10 times fast laugh.gif ) that I'd like to try sometime as well. Hard to justify the $$ though.

 

I do like nodeless, and it'd be a perfect technique for those cut-off culm parts! I'm going to make a 7' one piece rod later this winter - more of an experiment than anything, but doing it nodeless should make the process easier (if for no other reason than I can use excess culm sections).

 

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Carl,

 

I love Goldenwitch stuff. I bought my beveler, forms, binder and get a lot of my other stuff there. Their servce just rocks. One of these days I am going to make it down there to check out their shop.

 

Pete

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Guest

Great step by step, Carl- however, if you use Titebond III, what's that bottle of Gorilla Glue next to the binder for? innocent.gif

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Ack!! I knew someone would catch that - but now I know at least one person is paying attention. I should have pulled an OSD and changed that into a bottle of gin or something. biggrin.gif

 

Because binding is so messy, I didn't want to bust out the camera so I used an older picture of the binder that I had taken a couple of months ago.

 

You also might notice that it's a dowel rod in the binder rather than a rod section...

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This is great watching all this! I'd not seen that style binder before, who's that available through?? Just curious. I'm going the cheap route and building a Garrison style binder, thank goodness my dad's pretty handy with stuff like that. smile.gif

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Hey Lance,

 

I got the binder from Tim Preusch. I was debating between a Garrison style and a 4 string, but decided on the Preusch because it made more sense to me. With the way a Garrison is designed, I could see two problems. First the way the rod binds in one direction at a time, leads me to believe that it would be more prone to introduce twist in the rod section. And secondly, with the section being constantly spun over the holders, the sharp edges of the strips have the potential to be damaged.

 

Both of these issues are purely theoretical as I have never used a Garrison and, on the other hand, many, many people both use and prefer that style binder. Not to mention they are very cheap to construct from scratch.

 

In contrast, a 4 string binder winds 4 strings at a time, with each one counterrotating with another so no twist is introduced. And, rather than the rod section spinning through the binder, the thread actually rotates around the blank. All I have to do is pull the section straight through and let the binder do its thing.

 

Plus it has the cool foot-pedal throttle! tongue.gif

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Guest

This Bamboo fly rod will really be something special.

I know who ever wins the tying contest will have a fine pieces of workmanship.

I will be trying my damest to win this contest and I know many others will be doing the same.

To win this great fly rod will be a long shot for me because of the many great tiers we have as members on this site, but that doesn’t mean I won’t be trying.

 

flex.gif

OSD.

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After several days drying (and vacationing!), I finally got around to sanding the blank this afternoon.

 

I started with 320 grit on the butt section. I sanded each flat until only the thinnest haze of glue was remaining. I then switched to 400 grit and removed the final bit of glue.

 

After I had completed the butt section, I did the same to the tip. I always start with the butt so that I can get 'warmed up' before tackling the much more stressful tips.

 

user posted image

 

I then spent a little time straightening the rod sections. It seems that no matter how careful I am, and what technique I use, there is always some bends to the rod. To straighten these, I carefully heat the offending area over low setting on a heat gun until it is hot to the touch - but not too hot to touch!. I'll then counter bend the area and hold it for 30 seconds or so. Once done the sections are 'mostly straight'. Bamboo rods always seem to have some minor bends and sweeps to them no matter how hard you work on it (but so do graphite blanks for that matter - take a look at a couple when you get the chance).

 

user posted image

 

user posted image

 

After I was satisfied I did a final go over with some 0000 steel wool to take out the last of the sanding marks, and then immersed the blank in a 1 1/4" tube of PVC filled with impregnation solution.

 

The impregnation solution will soak into the rod to fully waterproof it, while also giving a nice varnish sheen to the outside. It also adds less weight to the finished rod than a dipped or brushed varnish overcoat.

 

Tomorrow I'll pull the sections from the solution and then let them cure for several days before continuing the rod making process.

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