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Kingfisher

Cork accents

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I've got a question: where does one go to find those cork accent rings that are often seen on snazzy custom rods? They appear to be about 1/8" thick, and I've seen them in what appear to be red, green, blue, and standard burl, though they may for all I know actually be rubberized cork. Any leads? If you're looking for examples, check out the following site:

http://www.meiserflyrods.com/gallery.html

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Guest

the thing narrow bands of color look like burl rings, most of the end ones look like rubberized cork. which would make sense since rubberized cork is more durable than burl.

 

steve

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Thanks for the responses, guys. I had never heard of C & D before, will have to look them up next time I'm getting ready to build a rod. The rings I'm using on my current project are from REC.

 

The thin accent bands appear to me to be thinner than the 1/4" thick rings that are available, though I could be wrong. My wife's uncle used to build a fair number of rods each year and I think he used something similar, though I'd be willing to bet that his materials and supplies came from Dale Clemens which is no longer in buisness. I suppose that the thinner bands could be created simply by running the 1/4" rings over a belt sander for a few seconds... if only I had the space for a shop in my NYC apartment! I'll keep looking, perhaps I've simply overlooked something.

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i haven't seen them come in really thin rings...... another thing to consider is to use craft foam for accent pieces in a cork grip. you can get it in a myriad of colors, and once the epoxy is cured/soaked into it, you can sand it down to shape and it will nice and hard. just another thought.

 

steve

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I've used Custom Grip as accent rings on a cork grip. It really does add to the look of the grip, but it doesn't sand down like the cork does. I did the final sanding on the lathe, an it all looked like it was coming out find, but the Custom Grip just doesn't sand down as fast as the cork. The result is ribs of the Custom Grip instead of bands of color.

 

If I were going to reccomend color accents to people, I would keep the same material throughout the grip. (ie: cork with rubberized cork accents, EVA with EVA, etc.) The last issue of Rod Building had a nice article of making multi-colored EVA foam grips.

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yeah, if you do the foam thing, you need to saturate all surfaces with your epoxy of choice (be it rod build, flexcoat rodbuilders, etc.). when it dries it will soak in making it hard enough to sand decently. Then when you sand it, a lathe is the preferred method, especially if you have a tool rest as you can get a smoother transition. I'm not a big fan of full EVA grips, but this craft foam makes nice accent pieces. I'm not too sure when i'm going to build my next personal spinning rod, but when i do, i'll put some in it and show ya what i'm talking about.

 

steve

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If you'll be turning your own, wood is another great accent for cork grips. Just cut small squares from thin pieces of hardwoods, drill a hole and mount up as you would cork. Looks really nice if you match it to a reel seat.

 

I've purchased a couple premade ones from Damon Rods if you don't have a lathe steup.

user posted image

 

The top grip is trimmed in cherry burl to match the reel seat, and the bottom grip is solid septiar burl. I paid $25 for the cork/wood grip, and $50 for the all wood (not including the reel seats). Both were custom orders which took about 2 weeks to fill. NFI - just another option.

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I Haven’t used accent rings in between cork rings I like the look of just plain cork.

The place I use the burl and rubberized cork is on the butt end of the fighting butts.

 

Like on this 8 weight rod

 

user posted image

 

 

OSD.

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theres a purist in every bunch... LOL. I'm not one to go overboard with the colors and whatnot in my grips either.... thats just too much in my opinion. The foam looks nice, for three bands (one color sandwiched in between another) its a little less than 3/8", and is nice if you can have it match the wraps/hardware. I have done some inlaying of other objects for something a little different, like old marine dress jacket buttons, buffalo nickels, still working on nymphs.... i just can't get them right like terry does. I get a haze from the solution no matter what, i gotta call him to see if he does anything i don't do. maybe the formaldehyde is more epoxy friendly than the iso alcohol that i am using to preserve em.

 

steve

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The one thing that worries me about grips made of wood and cork is that one of them will shrink faster than the other one in cold weather (and vice versa with expanding in hot weather) due to different coefficients of expansion, and over time the bond between the cork and wood could potentially weaken and cause some sort of cracking in the cork itself. They look cool, though.

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i don't think you'll have much problem with that. the thing is most all of the epoxies used in rod building are somewhat elastic... they have to be. the rod flexes much more than any differential in expansion/contraction will be. I would imagine the expansion/contraction of the wood/cork would create stresses well within the elastic deformation properties of the epoxies.

 

steve

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Ted Knott a local bamboo rod builder I know uses pine bark to make some of his handles. He just uses a hole saw to cut the rings from pine bark nuggets and glues them together. There's not much difference to the feel of the handle than cork but its a lot darker in color. I'm sure you could use them for accent sections in a cork handle.

 

Ken cool.gif

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There is a similar technique described in one of the more recent issues of Power Fibers about a gentleman who uses birch bark instead of cork. Looked very labor intensive as he did the entire grip, but it looked really nice!

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