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j.sarchet

how to tie rubber legs

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:D

 

Simple overhand knot directly on the hook shank... drape the strands over the top of the shank, tie the knot below the hook, hold the strands tight so the knot "works through" the rubber.

 

I think sometimes we try to make things more difficult than they need to be. :rolleyes:

 

Rob, that works well when tying something like a girdle bug or rubber legged buggar or some other type where the rubber will be overwrapped with chenille or dubbing. In fact, the overhand knot method is the best way of attaching "rubber leg" material when you only want one leg off of each side and multiple times up the shank. However, I don't think you'll have much luck tying a four strand bunch of legs onto that spider or across the back of the popper head without it being entirely to bulky.

I believe in simple as well and if you look at my photos, SIMPLE is precisely what I've demonstrated. Can't get any simpler than folding the rubber over your thread and tying it in; even an overhand knot is more complicated that what I've demonstrated above. Of course as I mentioned a few sentences back, if only one leg off of each side is desired then the overhand knot is the way to go.

 

Respectfully,

Kirk

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Seems more like thread tension/positioning as stated...like ereything else...

 

For cork poppers use the traditional way with big needle and pliers. Tying them in last lilke Stipplepop... is possibly a better way for some. Doesn't put holes in the cork but doesn't get'em out front either. Trick is gotta use needle w/ big enough eye and small enough to not make such a big hole. I use the rubber legs that come stuck to gether in sheets (for bass jigs) and use at least 2,3 and sometimes seperate'em after pullin'em thru. But on big bugs you want stout legs so keep them doubled/tripled....$.02

Later DL

10091498sh.jpg

bassbugeyesen4.jpg

 

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Rob, that works well when tying something like a girdle bug or rubber legged buggar or some other type where the rubber will be overwrapped with chenille or dubbing. In fact, the overhand knot method is the best way of attaching "rubber leg" material when you only want one leg off of each side and multiple times up the shank. However, I don't think you'll have much luck tying a four strand bunch of legs onto that spider or across the back of the popper head without it being entirely to bulky.

I believe in simple as well and if you look at my photos, SIMPLE is precisely what I've demonstrated. Can't get any simpler than folding the rubber over your thread and tying it in; even an overhand knot is more complicated that what I've demonstrated above. Of course as I mentioned a few sentences back, if only one leg off of each side is desired then the overhand knot is the way to go.

 

Respectfully,

Kirk

 

 

hm... excellent point, Kirk. I was thinking deer hair bugs, and two strands for that. For the standard foam spider or bonefish bitters I use the 'fold-over-thread' method. As far as poppers go, for my own I rarely use rubber legs at all, but I add them to my friends' and customers' if that's what they want. Of course with foam poppers it's the needle trick pre-epoxy.

 

But what got me thinking is "four strands." So... four strands of rubber on each side? Really? Foam spiders and bitters, sure, but poppers? Okay, I use none, rarely up to two on a deer hair popper. Maybe I'm inside my bubble again (as my wife likes to say), but I didn't realize folks were putting so many strands on now-a-days. Is this the new trend (forgive my ignorance), and does it really make that much difference to have more rubber legs?

 

I could see perhaps at times it would. My hang up with them for my own personal popper flies is that the rubber just breaks off or deteriorates long before the popper is no good, and I've not seen any difference in catch rates without.

 

Okay, 'nuff ramblin outta me! Just thinkin out loud.

 

 

 

 

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Rob, that works well when tying something like a girdle bug or rubber legged buggar or some other type where the rubber will be overwrapped with chenille or dubbing. In fact, the overhand knot method is the best way of attaching "rubber leg" material when you only want one leg off of each side and multiple times up the shank. However, I don't think you'll have much luck tying a four strand bunch of legs onto that spider or across the back of the popper head without it being entirely to bulky.

I believe in simple as well and if you look at my photos, SIMPLE is precisely what I've demonstrated. Can't get any simpler than folding the rubber over your thread and tying it in; even an overhand knot is more complicated that what I've demonstrated above. Of course as I mentioned a few sentences back, if only one leg off of each side is desired then the overhand knot is the way to go.

 

Respectfully,

Kirk

 

 

hm... excellent point, Kirk. I was thinking deer hair bugs, and two strands for that. For the standard foam spider or bonefish bitters I use the 'fold-over-thread' method. As far as poppers go, for my own I rarely use rubber legs at all, but I add them to my friends' and customers' if that's what they want. Of course with foam poppers it's the needle trick pre-epoxy.

 

But what got me thinking is "four strands." So... four strands of rubber on each side? Really? Foam spiders and bitters, sure, but poppers? Okay, I use none, rarely up to two on a deer hair popper. Maybe I'm inside my bubble again (as my wife likes to say), but I didn't realize folks were putting so many strands on now-a-days. Is this the new trend (forgive my ignorance), and does it really make that much difference to have more rubber legs?

 

I could see perhaps at times it would. My hang up with them for my own personal popper flies is that the rubber just breaks off or deteriorates long before the popper is no good, and I've not seen any difference in catch rates without.

 

Okay, 'nuff ramblin outta me! Just thinkin out loud.

 

Rob, good conversation. You're gonna laugh at this but I never put rubber/silicone on deer hair bugs; for me, its not because I don't think its effective, but I always cut the damn things off when trimming the hair head.

As for rubber on poppers, I'm more apt to do that for the smaller bugs cause gills like em like that so much and it gives a larger look from below to attract the occasional bass.

However, for your question about poppers now-a-days, down south here, rubber legs used to be on poppers when I began fly fishing in the late 1970's although, I think you're right, I don't think it was four. Typically on bream and bass bugs, a single leg was threaded through the head diagonally from front to back and then one across the middle to create three "legs" on each side of the head and on the smaller bream bugs you would typically see two to four strands trailing off the back. Peck's made them with and without rubber too and I fished them both and found I had better luck with the ones with rubber. I hated that the rubber dried out but now-a-days with silicone, you don't have that problem.

I think on an average day, you won't see much difference but I think there are times when the rubber legged bug will out produce the one without especially with bream. Of course that could be biased as I often fish silicone legged surface bream bugs unless I'm throwing a diver.

 

Kirk

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And when they have dried out when you are talking about rubber legs run through the body of the popper, just pull the old legs off and install new rubber legs... problem solved.

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Let's summarize...

When I first saw Stipplepop's legs tied underneath I thought what an ingenious way to do it. That's waht's so great about this place ...it's a wealth of great ideas all the time; many times just small things...nevertheless... So, since you can replace old legs thru the cork you could very easily start your thread behind your body ahead of your hackles and replace bad rubbers the Stipple way also. You might have to disconnect your weed guards from the eye but could refasten, maybe... Lotta people put their rubber legs thru deer hair bugs using the needle lastly also. And therefore could be replaced later if need be too....Remembering weed guards and legs in the hair trimming process can be problem....ain't gonna change...

I'm glad we got this strait. Thanks Fellas! :yahoo:

Later DL

 

 

Oh, tying rubber legs is a function of thread tension, background, and positioning...pretty much like erything else... :wallbash:

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How do you all get your rubber legs to stay knotted after you tie them. Like these:

 

post-19670-1275616880_thumb.png

 

I have tried this several times on some hopper flies but the knot won't stay.

Any tips or suggestions. I would like to be able to do this, just to save some saddle hackle.

 

 

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How do you all get your rubber legs to stay knotted after you tie them. Like these:

 

post-19670-1275616880_thumb.png

 

I have tried this several times on some hopper flies but the knot won't stay.

Any tips or suggestions. I would like to be able to do this, just to save some saddle hackle.

Great looking froggies! Whenever I attach rubber/silicone by knotting it, I make several criss-cross wraps across the knot with my tying thread.

Not sure how others do.

Kirk

 

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How do you all get your rubber legs to stay knotted after you tie them. Like these:

 

post-19670-1275616880_thumb.png

 

I have tried this several times on some hopper flies but the knot won't stay.

Any tips or suggestions. I would like to be able to do this, just to save some saddle hackle.

Great looking froggies! Whenever I attach rubber/silicone by knotting it, I make several criss-cross wraps across the knot with my tying thread.

Not sure how others do.

Kirk

 

I didn't tie these by the way, just the photo i found when i googled knotted rubber legs.

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I agree those are great looking frogs. I've tied legs together with thread but haven't knotted rubber legs together.

 

In examining the forelegs, the upper legs are twisted above the knot. Perhaps at some point a cement is used which

when dry holds both the knots and the legs in a twisted position.

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I feel like a duh. I was thinking how to hold the knot when knotting on to the hook; guess I had that on the brain. I've both tied legs to make a joint by basically doing a nail knot, snell, whip finish with tying thread or tying mono. Also, I've done the knots and never had a problem. You have to slowly pull the knot tight so the strands stretch thin within the knot but don't break, then when you release and everything expands back out, the knot stays, which is actually how monofiliment fishing knots work. I've tried glue on silicone and it does not stick, maybe with rubber it would??? Thanks for clearing that up Stippled.

 

Kirk

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Thanks. Will have to give it a try. Have to give tying a break for about a month, unfortunately.

 

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How do you all get your rubber legs to stay knotted after you tie them. Like these:

 

post-19670-1275616880_thumb.png

 

on frog patterns you could add paddles on the legs instead of knots, like this paddle popper shown on the river road creations site

 

MuzFrog4.JPG

 

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The late Michael Verduin was a marvelous, innovative tyer, and a good friend. One of his favorite patterns for fly fishing for bream was a micro-jig called a "Cap Spider".

 

A video of Michael tying a "Cap Spider" and explaining how he fished this pattern can be found on You Tube:

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=VzZekzILGRI

 

In this video, Michael gives one on the very best demos of tying in silcon/rubber legs that you'll ever see.

 

Many tyers from across Texas and the rest of the Mid-South learned a great deal from Michael, and he is greatly missed.

 

 

Bowfin47

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To get the knot to stay in rubber legs, lick the knot then tighten. Works almost all the time.

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