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1337Kona

Getting Started Tying

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I was wondering if anyone has an opinion on a Cabelas flytying kit. Anyone have one? Or have any other suggestions for a novice? I am just looking for a starter set. They also have a material starter set with tools is this a good way to get started?

 

For example

Cabela's

 

 

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I started with that kit. Don't do it!!!!!!! You are better off getting individual items. Do you have a budget set? I am sure you could buy what you need from will.

 

john

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I agree, don't buy it. I was given one similar to this about 15 years ago or so. Had to be polite (since it was my future inlaws that bought it for me lol). But was one of the nicer cabelas kits. Guess what? I could only use a fraction of the stuff. Most of it was low quality or useless.

 

If you are a beginning tyer, I suggest first finding someone who'll let you try tying on their vise to see if you'll like it. Could possibly even take a class at a shop and see if it grabs you. If it does, simply buy a vise that suites you (try tying on a few, don't just take the one the shop tries to sell you). Then figure out what you want to tie and buy the materials for THAT FLY ONLY! Of course, you'll also need a bobbin and a pair of sciccors as well to round it all out (you can move up to fancy gadgets later on if you find you still have the tying bug). Once you feel you can tie that "fly" you've chosen. Move onto another fly and buy the materials for that one (unless you already have some of the materials already from the previous). I found it was better to pick a fly that took different tying styles on the second one (and different color materials). That way you get different techniques down, and start building up different color and types of material.

 

Just don't get in too much of a rush to buy tons of materials. Start out simple at first. Then, if you get bitten, you'll have a ton of materials like the rest of us (half we never use, but GOTTA HAVE IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!) wink.gif laugh.gif

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Yeah what Jerry said thumbsup.gif

 

He summed up my opinion pretty well but i'll say it anyway. Kits are 99.9% of the time a waste of money because you usually get very poor quality materials and tying with poor quality materials will make your first experiance in fly tying a bad one.

 

Try out a few "decent" quality vises, and get a some decent tools such as a ceramic bobin(around $12-16) decent scissors(dr.slicks are around $15-20) and a few other things such as hackle pliers, bodkin etc.

 

then do just as SH69 suggested...pick a fly for your first one for example a wooly bugger and by just the materials you need for that fly.

 

such as for wooly bugger #8 hooks($5) thread (uni 6/0 or 8/0 $1.50 spool) pack of marabou($2) card of chenille ($1.50) and some hackle, dont get a expensive neck when just starting out...get a decent less expensive neck (about $15-18)

 

Then like SH69 said tie that fly till your ready for a new pattern and buy just what you need for that pattern.

 

good luck and let us know what you decide

 

SD

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One other option would be to go with a good vise that has an "entry-level" price-tag that you could grow with, such as the one offered by BT's (one of the forum sponsors). As for the tools, I received a Dr. Slick Fly Tying Gift Set last year ($34) that includes a ceramic bobbin, good scissors, a good mazzarelli whip-finisher, hair stacker, hackle pliers, bobbin threader, bodkin/half-hitch tool, and all in a case that I ended up using for flies (the case is lined with a rippled piece of foam). It was by far one of the best fly tying gifts I've ever gotten, as all the components are of good quality, and I use many of them everyday.

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I picked up an Orvis kit for 99$ came with a bunch of tools and the material for a few flies. I admit the material wasn't up to par but at that time most of my flies were junk anyway. The vice is still going strong though I sometimes wish I had a nice one. I've tied hundreds of flies on it. Some of the tools have broken as well.

 

If your not going with a kit you can get by with the following:

 

Vise

Hackle Pliers

Scissors

Bobbin. For around 6$

Bodkin

 

There are some nice tool kits as well with no materials.

 

Materials for a wooly bugger (olive and black) a great fly to start with as already mentioned.

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I agree, kits just arent worth the hassle.. you will be back in the store within the 1st week cheers.gif Piece by Piece ..

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Thanks everyone. In less than 24 h I have 6 replies. I appreciate all the suggestions, I can tell I am going to be here a lot biggrin.gif

 

And no I have no buget( kind of whatever it takes to get started)

 

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QUOTE
kind of whatever it takes to get started

 

 

Well then let me make up a little wish list for you.............. laugh.gif

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You will likely benefit from the strategy of building your own "kit" piece-by-piece rather than buying a prepackaged kit. You will save money over time and have better quality gear, rather than buying a new vise, tools, or other items when you outgrow the beginners kit in a few months of regular tying. One of your first investments as you start building your tool set should be a good pair of scissors. I like Dr. Slick scissors; sharp, large finger loops, and fine tip points (until you drop them on the floor....).

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I started with a cheapo kit and tied flies with it. Materials were OK. Tools were OK. BUT I have added materials and a few tools. The original tools and vise are still working. The best thing is to narrow down your fishing habits to just a few flies. Check with the local shops and tell them what you fish for mostly. As suggested, start simple and work up. Here in SE Tennessee, I can get by with about 6 or 8 basic patterns in 2 or 3 sizes each. Nothing as satisfying as catching a trophy on your own fly. Don't be afraid to experiment, either. headbang.gif

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Most classes I have help teach have supplied the material.

We provide a recipe and suggest the tiers purchase the required material in advance. If so just buy the basic tools, a vice , bobbin, bodkin.

 

One other thing I would suggest is spend the extra money on a ceramic bobbin. They are pricey but well worth it. Thread has a tendency to break with out a ceramic bobbin. Friction from turning the thread over and over and over the hook shank will cause the thread to snap/break with a non ceramic bobbin. When you first starting out learning material control. You DO NOT need your thread breaking.

 

IMO kits are a waste of money. When you really start to get know the difference between good and bad material. You will realize the material in you kit is of low grade. Low grade material is harder to work with and the end result will be an out of proportion fly.

 

Fly tying is two thing material control and proportions. Learn these two things and your flys will be durable and appealing.

 

Keep us updated and feel free to ask any question. You have a novel of knowledge in this site.

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Allow me to throw my three cents worth in (inflation has caught up). I checked Flyfisherman magazine and found a neat advertisement. For a person starting, there is a company located at www.tie-a-fly.com that sells kits for 14 major patterns. Kit has everything needed including instructions and a finished fly for a model. You could get your vise and tools separately and then expand from there. To me, tying is just one of the fun things connected with flyfishing. I bass fished for several years and marvel at the price of lures for that sport. I can tie several flies for the price of a spinnerbait or crankbait. At the local TU chapter, I am known as "The Cheap Skeet." wink.gif

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QUOTE (skeet3t @ Nov 4 2004, 09:18 AM)
...I can tie several flies for the price of a spinnerbait or crankbait...

No kidding! Lures that cost $10-$20 each?!? And I can outfish them all with my $3 red & white Heddon Torpedo! wink.gif

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Buy 2 pairs of scissors, a nice pair and the genaric brand.. use the good scissors on fine materials like hackles, hurls threads and such.. and the cheap scissors for everything else.. I wont even cut tinsel with my good blades.. cheers.gif

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