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Robert M

Another would you be interested post.

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I would do one of those oriole flies if you hosted... a lot of the other patterns look cool, I just don't have the materials to do them...

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I would be interested in this one. As long as there is enough time given and we're not too particular on the hook.

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I would be in here. I have a copy of the Marbury favorite flies book if anyone might want to see the color plates I could take pics of them and post recipes to the best of my knowledge.

 

Steve

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Here is another link to read from a great book Bassin with a Fly written by Jack Ellis about the History and demise of fly rodding for Bass

http://books.google.com/books?id=MB5a-eYRf...p;q&f=false

It's an interesting read.

 

And here is another one that goes into the actual tying of these flies from the Bass Pond Forum

http://thebasspond.com/topic/2323/Classic-Bass-Flies

It is definitely good information.

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I would be interested in this one. As long as there is enough time given and we're not too particular on the hook.

 

How long would you estimate that you would need to tie a dozen of this type of fly?

As for hooks I guess this excerpt from an article about Classic Bass Flies on the Bass Pond Site it is from a Fly Tyer article I believe.

 

"HOOKS Older hooks had straight wire “blind eyes” and Sproat, Limerick, and O’Shaughnessey bends. Tiers added loops of twisted gut to the ends of the bare wire to create eyes. Modern blind-eye hooks are available, but you may use similar hooks with contemporary looped eyes. The Mustad 3366 is a close modern substitute of the classic blind-eye hooks. The Kensey or Kinsey hook (there are two spellings depending upon the original maker, Allcock and Mustad, respectively) is considered the classic bass hook and was used by many tiers. The Kensey had a wide gap with a straight shank that had indentations at the blind-eye end. The indentations helped the gut eye stay attached to the shank.

Suppliers who specialize in materials for tying classic salmon flies still carry twisted gut, but you may substitute with twisted monofilament. The thickness of the silk gut or twisted monofilament is a matter of personal choice; some tiers like thin gut loops, while others prefer thicker strands that match the diameter of the hook shank. If you like thin loops, twist together two strands of clear monofilament; if you prefer thicker loops, use three strands. Experiment with different diameters of monofilament until you are pleased with the results.it just depends on what type pattern you were thinking about."

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I would be in here. I have a copy of the Marbury favorite flies book if anyone might want to see the color plates I could take pics of them and post recipes to the best of my knowledge.

 

Steve

 

That would be cool if anyone needs the info.

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So what's up man??? I say we go and "git er' done". What's the specifics and time frame???? Heck I'm already tying!!!

 

Steve

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Can I join your swap. Iwill tye a Blue JAY on a Mustad 3366 may have to use more than one size hook.

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Can I join your swap. Iwill tye a Blue JAY on a Mustad 3366 may have to use more than one size hook.

 

If this is a go let me know what size 3366 you need and I'll send you a dozen or so, I have a bunch of them in 6, 4, and 2.

 

Steve

 

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This is most definietly an interesting swap. If it goes would a "Doctor Henshall Bass Bug" as described in William Sturgis's book Fly Tying (copyright 1940) fit the bill?

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This is most definietly an interesting swap. If it goes would a "Doctor Henshall Bass Bug" as described in William Sturgis's book Fly Tying (copyright 1940) fit the bill?

 

Yes it is open to ANY pattern used for Bass that was on the Market or used by fly fishermen of Spat, Splat fishers on or before 1961.

I will get with the powers that be and set up a sign up page as soon as I can.

The swap will be open to all tier's any where in the world as long as we can work something out for postage and time.

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