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nightheron

What Constitutes a Fly

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For me a fly is anything I chuck with a fly rod. I fish pretty much exclusively in the salt so the closest thing to a bug I tie is a shrimp or crab, so I'm no purest. By the way, your fly wold make an incredible imitation of a greenie (threadfin herring) which has the same shape.

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I don't think it's as much as how you cast it as it's how you tie it. I could cast a Rat-L-Trap on a 10 wt but it doesn't make it a fly. As a tier who gets flack from purists for my muskie flies that have blades, rattles and are 14" long, I'm pretty accepting of broad definitions of what a fly is. I've gone by the definition in the Alaska regs, which is where I initially got away from trout and dries and got into big fish and huge flies, which says (paraphrased) "any lure constructed by the method commonly accepted as 'tying.'" As such, if I'm laying down a thread base and attaching materials via thread wraps, for me, it's a fly. There are exceptions, such as popper bodies or those Gummi fly bodies. If you're worried about what people say, I'd not worry too much. That's just opinion. But if they're being fished in "fly only" water then it may come down to interpretation of state law and what a CO would say. A Rapala with some bucktail tied on the aft hook is still a lure. Maybe a good place to draw the line is if you're tying/building "on" a hook instead of hanging hooks "on" the lure itself. I think your flies look cool and I'd not feel any heartache over calling them flies.

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Maybe a good place to draw the line is if you're tying/building "on" a hook instead of hanging hooks "on" the lure itself. agn54

 

Accordng to this, a tube fly would be a "lure"? Don't know the answer either. Probably the best answer would be to see if there is a legal definition in the local fishing regs. And that could easily be different depending on the state you are in. I like the definition (purely for my own use) that if it is "tied" it is a fly, if it is "built" it is a lure. Some are obviously part one and part the other (such as popper flies and Rooster Tail lures). :huh::blink: Don't know what to do, mostly don't worry about it, just enjoy the tying and the fishing. :D

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I'd say this is no less a fly that a balsa wood popper. Both have a feather or other material tail. Some of us have been tying mylar braided tube mosquito fish with feather tails. No one has called any names as far as I know. Good for the goose is good for the gander.

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Kirk,there is a method to my madness on the hook gap issue. First, the inherent body shape of a shad is quite deep chested which limits me somewhat. Second, I am not one that buys into conventional wisdom with regard to hook gap. I catch big fish on size 26 flies that have a much smaller gap. Many streamers have as narrow a gap. I just need a little skin.In fairness to your concern, most would agree with you.

 

Interesting point Night. size 26 is pretty damn small. I have in fact caught bass up to 4lbs on size #10 hooks. On those occasions, the hook gap on the #10 was still clear, no body material to deflect the point away from the skin. I do see your point though, as long as the point finds flesh, it should be able to slide right in.

 

Kirk

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Nightheron:

 

It appears that the images you have posted of the fly clear up for me what would be my major

concern, that damage to the fish is limited as much as possible in the spirit of catch and

release practices. There seems to be little or no danger of the metal edges of the can cutting

the fish as you have designed it.

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Maybe a good place to draw the line is if you're tying/building "on" a hook instead of hanging hooks "on" the lure itself. agn54

 

Accordng to this, a tube fly would be a "lure"? Don't know the answer either. Probably the best answer would be to see if there is a legal definition in the local fishing regs. And that could easily be different depending on the state you are in. I like the definition (purely for my own use) that if it is "tied" it is a fly, if it is "built" it is a lure. Some are obviously part one and part the other (such as popper flies and Rooster Tail lures). :huh::blink: Don't know what to do, mostly don't worry about it, just enjoy the tying and the fishing. :D

 

How so? A tube fly is still built "on" the hook. I think if you've got hook hangers or split rings you're into "lure" territory. As far as the local regs, like I mentioned, that's what I go by. There's always room for interpretation, but at the same time, common sense does apply.

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