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kentuckytroutbum

Need help with starting dubbing on thread

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Been tying for about 2 1/2 years, and I'm still having a difficulty getting the dubbing wrapped on the thread. It won't

stay wrapped around the thread, and often it will fall off or bunch up. I've have a number of tying books, but I would

rather view a video on this.

 

Anyone have suggestions or a link to a YouTube video that would help?

 

Thanks in advance.

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Here's a Youtube video showing the basic applying dubbing should be helpful

 

 

Mike

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i find that is i am grabing too large a chunk of dubbing it will clump like you said. A bit of wax on the thread really helps or just pinch a bit less. If you want that thicker "body" look go with a dubbing loop. hope it helps

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Dubbing takes practice, practice, practice. Use as small bit of dubbing can get then cut that in half. To wax or not to wax. You will have tiers that swear by by waxed thread and those who swear at waxed thread. I use waxed thread all the time when I am dubbing a fly. Good luck..... :)

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First prepare a sparse "noodle" of dubbing. It should taper at both ends and, as everyone here will tell you, it should contain half (or quarter) as much fur as you think it should. If you choose not to use wax- wet your fingertips with a bit of water. Stroke the thread with your wet fingers then apply your dubbing.

 

If you are still having trouble, you might try tying down the end of your dubbing noodle before wrapping it around the thread.

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Everyone-

 

Thanks for the quick responses, you've definitely given me something to think about, and to try next time I dub some flies.

And the video was just what I was looking for. Need to get some dubbing wax also.

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All good advice. Try just lightly applying wax to you fingertips. It gives a bit more traction and helps to get the dubbing started on the thread. I never wax the thread unless I'm touch dubbing, but wax is like religion and politics. Try everything then do what works for you.

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read this. maybe it will help

 

http://ukflydressing.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=sbs&action=display&thread=4046

 

dont forget to bookmark it.

 

Great set of instructions on dubbing. Didn't know there was so many ways to do it, but "scotfly" in the UK seemed to have covered them all.

I hadn't realized that you could insert deer hair (and possibly elk) into the dubbing loop to get the effect of palmering.

 

Thanks very much.

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People still use wax for dubbing? Hmm. I figured by now everyone had decided that the spit on your finger method was a whole lot easier and cheaper! Of course, if you're worried about spittin' on your flies or getting a little possum or squirrel juice in your mouth, you're better off using wax or water. I'd bet you dollars to donuts that the problem is getting too much dubbing to begin with. Get just enough so that if you dropped it on a carpeted floor, you'd not be able to see it very well - then half that. I use the "peck-peck-peck" method of taking a little dubbing from my left hand and adding it to the thread in stages with my right. Maybe I'll make a video myself, so you all can laugh at the redneck fly tier that licks his fingers like a nervous back-up QB at the big game! :)

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I agree with the previous posts. Using less and less dubbing will get you that finely tapered body that I struggled to master for as long as I've been tying. I still have to remind myself to go easy on the dubbing, especially when using non-synthetics that tend to clump more when you roll it on the thread.

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I usually only use wax for touch-dubbing. I'll second the comment about Rockworm's wax, darn good stuff. One disadvantage to using wax when applying dubbing in the "usual" way is that you can't slide the dubbing up the thread to get close to the hook. But that's usually not a big deal, anyway. All the comments about using small amounts of dubbing are right on the money. If you use too much, the body ends up looking like a ship's mooring line. I prefer the "buggy" look, as I tie lots of flymphs and wet flies, so I use dubbing loops, split thread, and touch dubbing much more than typical "rope" dubbing.

Play around with the different methods, and use different materials. There are lots of ways to skin a cat.

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A common mistake is to twist the dubbing in two directions. This unwinds the dubbing from the thread and makes it either clump up or fall off. Just twist in one direction only...I do it clockwise.

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