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How to do REEL WINGS help me please

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I take it that you don't want to send off and purchase the product listed. There are several different ways you can make realistic wings. Coating ordinary tissue (Kleenex,) with flexement and then cutting out the shapes is one way to start. I add veining by either drawing with a fine marker, or gluing on hackle fibers or other bird plumage.

 

Tea bags, Swiss straw, and cellophane are other material you can use.

 

Organza ribbons will also work. Here is a web site with some step by steps that may help. realistic flies

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please someone help me how do I such wings as shown below in the picture(realistic wings .Thanks

http://www.reelwings.co.uk/shop/up-wings/item/upwings

 

if you explore the reel wings website there are 3 videos that show you how to use the products!

 

heres the link

 

http://www.reelwings.co.uk/tying

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There is still another technique for making your own, and getting the veining, all in a couple of simple operations. If you know someone who has a sheet of the old Traun River wings, make a Xerox copy to use as a "master". Transfer the images to a 'transparency' using your "master". Place the material you want to use for the wings on an ironing board and place the "master" on it, toner side down against the material. Now iron the image onto the material using an iron set on Medium Heat. This will transfer the toner to the winging material. If you are lucky, you may get two "ironings" out of the transparency before all of the toner has been transferred.

 

Now, if I could just find an old plankton net that someone would be willing to donate to the cause! Don't ask me how they do it, but the thread crossing points in a plankton net are knotted, just like in a fishing net; even in a net of 50 micron mesh size (there are 25.4 thousand microns in an inch)!! This knotting prevents any cuts from 'running', making the material almost indestructible. Thus, the teeth of fish should never fray such wings.

 

Cheers!

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My pleasure Bill. A very good friend who repairs old clocks taught me that trick about 20 years ago. He used it to redo badly worn paper clock faces. Thus, I can not claim it as an original idea. Wish I could.

 

Cheers.

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There is still another technique for making your own, and getting the veining, all in a couple of simple operations. If you know someone who has a sheet of the old Traun River wings, make a Xerox copy to use as a "master". Transfer the images to a 'transparency' using your "master". Place the material you want to use for the wings on an ironing board and place the "master" on it, toner side down against the material. Now iron the image onto the material using an iron set on Medium Heat. This will transfer the toner to the winging material. If you are lucky, you may get two "ironings" out of the transparency before all of the toner has been transferred.

 

Now, if I could just find an old plankton net that someone would be willing to donate to the cause! Don't ask me how they do it, but the thread crossing points in a plankton net are knotted, just like in a fishing net; even in a net of 50 micron mesh size (there are 25.4 thousand microns in an inch)!! This knotting prevents any cuts from 'running', making the material almost indestructible. Thus, the teeth of fish should never fray such wings.

 

Cheers!

thanks for the answers.

perchjerker a got

Maybe some picture of what you interpreted. possible step by step.

or any other how to make realistic wings.

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MyFly...

 

I do not have any photos, so will post as a SBS.

 

A friend, who has a complete sheet of the old Traun River Caddis wings, took a photo of the wings and sent me a copy via email from his photo album. I printed this image out, which I use as my "Master".

 

Using transparency stock, instead of paper in the Xerox machine, you make a Xerox copy of the "Master" onto the transparency stock, just as you would do for use with an 'overhead' projector.

 

You place the transparency copy onto the material you want to make the wings of, Toner side down. You then transfer the Toner to the wing material by "ironing" it on using your better half's iron---NO STEAM---set on Medium Heat. Toner transfer in the machine is a thermal process, which is repeated when you apply the iron to the transparency. The Toner is again transferred.

 

The Toner adheres to paper much better than to the 'plastic' of the transparency, thus making the transparency stock the ideal material to use as you want to transfer the Toner from the transparency stock to the material you have chosen for your wings. Paper images won't work.

 

Hope this clarifies the process for y9u.

 

Cheers.

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