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Fly Fishing Idaho

Fly size to rod size

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I was using my 5wt rod and casting a large #6 bass popper and the rod was bending a ton and when i cast the leader and fly didn't turn over. Was this because the leader/tipped too short, my rod isn't strong enough or just that I'm casting wrong? Also I want to start fly fishing for bass more than I do, and do you think I should get a larger wt rod. If you think a 5wt is enough than what flies would be good for bass?

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Its difficult to say without actually seeing your casting. But wind resistant flies are going to be difficult to 'turn over' so I would step up my tippet thickness and / or use a tapered leader and look to fish leader no longer than my rod length untill I was happy with the turnover.

If the fly was a really bushy big fly, #6 slim flies might be fine on a 5weight, I would think about a 7weight as my standard rod.

I would say for the majority of fishing a 7weight will cast most of everything you want but as your casting improves and you can double haul, a 5weight will cast a surprising size of fly. Also the taper of your fly line will have an impact.

Also the action of the rod matters. A slower middle action rod will throw a more open loop and can throw a bigger fly IMO. A faster tippy rod needs a different casting action and the loop will be tighter, leaving less room for error. I can throw some big pike flies on a #9 slow action rod that I can only just throw on my fast action #10 cause the faster rod is more work.

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Before I got my 3wt, I read that 3wt have trouble casting weighted nymphs and struggle to turn over a #12 dries, then, a few weeks ago, I went to a river that I knew had bass, but I only had the 3wt, I started fishing with my tiniest, lightest streamers, but by the end of the day, I was casting my heavier #8 cone-head streamers which have quite a bit of lead in the body too. To cast them, you might be tempted to try a faster casting tempo, to put more power in the cast. Do not do that! You have to wait until the streamer and the leader have completely unfurled behind you before the shoot. The other problem could be the leader, I found that a quite long stiff butt helped to turn over the heavier flies.

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Believe it or not, a piece of 15-17 lb. test Spider Wire casting line the length of the rod will serve both as your leaser and tippet, and turn your flies over quite nicely. Piker 20 has about said it all. For my VERY large bass bugs (1-2/0) I use a 9wt with a WF Bass Taper line; though I can cast many of my #1 size bugs quite easily with a 5 wt. A lot of it depends upon the wind,and the 'wind resistance' of the bug.

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im still learning the proper weight ratio also, however when trying to pike fish ive always read that for heavier fly you want to use a thicker shorter leaader and tipit.. maybee only 5 foot leader instead of rod length. it worked well for me on larger flys

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Its difficult to say without actually seeing your casting. But wind resistant flies are going to be difficult to 'turn over' so I would step up my tippet thickness and / or use a tapered leader and look to fish leader no longer than my rod length untill I was happy with the turnover.

If the fly was a really bushy big fly, #6 slim flies might be fine on a 5weight, I would think about a 7weight as my standard rod.

I would say for the majority of fishing a 7weight will cast most of everything you want but as your casting improves and you can double haul, a 5weight will cast a surprising size of fly. Also the taper of your fly line will have an impact.

Also the action of the rod matters. A slower middle action rod will throw a more open loop and can throw a bigger fly IMO. A faster tippy rod needs a different casting action and the loop will be tighter, leaving less room for error. I can throw some big pike flies on a #9 slow action rod that I can only just throw on my fast action #10 cause the faster rod is more work.

 

What he said.

 

Down here, most of the fly caught bass are smaller than 4 lbs and I'm not fishing heavy cover so my 5wt gets the most use. I can cast most size #2 bugs with it although it is much more effecient casting #6 and smaller on the 5wt. I have a 7wt that gets some use too. If your bass aren't too big or you aren't fishing heavy cover than go light.

 

Kirk

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