Jump to content
Fly Tying
Fish For Life

why Fly backing not other braded line

Recommended Posts

Besides the awesome skill, i think Kirk has something else and it is either a trolling motor or he can pole faster than most :)

 

Nah, and I don't buy the "skillful angling techniques" stuff either. I've heard from a very reliable source that the usual methods of nailing redfish in Louisiana involve the use of power winches and aircraft control cable. That gets the boys back home in time for a bowl of gumbo and a mayonnaise jar of Ol' Stump Blower. That's a tough crew down that way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to agree with Capt. Bob; I often fish the inside of Sebastian Inlet(very close to home) And I have a hooked many a redfish, snook and jack crevalle that has taken me well into my backing especially when they turn tail and get into the fast current trying to head out to sea. Not all redfish fight like Bluegills!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Besides the awesome skill, i think Kirk has something else and it is either a trolling motor or he can pole faster than most :)

 

Nah, and I don't buy the "skillful angling techniques" stuff either. I've heard from a very reliable source that the usual methods of nailing redfish in Louisiana involve the use of power winches and aircraft control cable. That gets the boys back home in time for a bowl of gumbo and a mayonnaise jar of Ol' Stump Blower. That's a tough crew down that way.

 

Its called a stick of dynamite!

 

Peter, the boys (guides) that spin fish, try to get limits of fish and return as soon as they can. Many spin fisher guides will take their clients out and they keep every legal fish until the 25 fish limit of speckled trout and 5 fish limit on redfish and will often be back to the dock before 10 am!

 

Kirk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nah, and I don't buy the "skillful angling techniques" stuff either. I've heard from a very reliable source that the usual methods of nailing redfish in Louisiana involve the use of power winches and aircraft control cable. That gets the boys back home in time for a bowl of gumbo and a mayonnaise jar of Ol' Stump Blower. That's a tough crew down that way.

 

 

Hahaha, When down to your backing i think you probably just point the rod in the direction of the fish and pole harder! This is Kirk's secret, he has more control over the fish at 100ft than 500 yards. 30lb is a hefty fish tho! I will just sit back and play boo-ray.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nah, and I don't buy the "skillful angling techniques" stuff either. I've heard from a very reliable source that the usual methods of nailing redfish in Louisiana involve the use of power winches and aircraft control cable. That gets the boys back home in time for a bowl of gumbo and a mayonnaise jar of Ol' Stump Blower. That's a tough crew down that way.

 

 

Hahaha, When down to your backing i think you probably just point the rod in the direction of the fish and pole harder! This is Kirk's secret, he has more control over the fish at 100ft than 500 yards. 30lb is a hefty fish tho! I will just sit back and play boo-ray.

 

I"m to old for that, electric trolling motors work much better!

 

Kirk

Here I am with a 22 lber, no backing needed.

DSC_1320-12.jpg

 

Here is my friend with a 30 lber, no backing needed.

DSC_0721.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some fish boogie and others don't. Like Kirk I've never had any red get me or my anglers into the backing (but our bigger reds are rarely on fly....). I have had one big snook on fly that burned a fly line and almost 100 yards of backing the first run (but must admit that was unusual - they mostly settle the fight very quickly if they're big and powerful). Bigger snook just rarely need to make long runs before they've buried your fly line up into one snag or other (bridge pilings a specialty for big snook).

 

Other species will give you a good look at your backing, a standard bonefish (under 10lbs) will burn almost 100 yards on that first run and subsequent runs will be less (unless you've got shark problems). Bigger bones, over 10 lbs, are a different proposition entirely - they'll burn that first 100 then pause a moment... Just when you think you've turned a really big bonefish, they'll start their second 100 yards - that's when you get into trouble since your backing is actually dragging bottom no matter how high you mount your flyrod....

In the days that I hunted permit on the flats it was rarely with a fly rod but I'm sure that most of those guys are going to need every bit of the backing you have once they're above 15lbs (and I've actually seen one or two that looked nearly 50lbs oceanside of Key Largo...). These days most of our permit are out on shallow wrecks on the gulf side of the 'Glades. Permit in 10 to 15 feet of water behave much more like big jacks (see below).

 

 

The fish that I expect to really need backing for are sharks, tarpon, and critters like big jack crevalle. For all of those guys 200 yards of backing may need to be assisted with some serious boat action to keep from being spooled. By the way, tonight we'll be sight fishing baby tarpon (mostly under 30lbs) with 8 and 9wt rods - every one of them will take us well into the backing for most of the fight since they usually go down current from whatever bridge we find them at....

 

All of this is aimed at inshore fly rodding. The moment you head out towards the reef or bluewater 300 yards of backing is a minimum requirement. A good friend of mine got a once in a lifetime shot to fish marlin on fly down in Panama a few years back. On the water the captain told him to set his drag at zero (not the slightest drag at all). He complied but thought it not needed. He actually was lucky enough to sight and hook a small black (300lb range). Here's what happened - he hooked up and watched his line scream off down into the backing in one or two seconds... Then while his line was howling straight away from the stern the fish jumped 100 yards in front of the boat (that's right, while the line is going one way the fish had reversed course and was going the opposite way).... No, he didn't win the fight - but he told me that the slightest drag would have parted the line - just from the water pressure alone.... Don't think I'll ever get to try it but 500 yards of backing might not be enough in that situation...

 

Tight lines

Bob LeMay

(954) 435-5666

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's just not fair! Great catch, can't imagine reeling it in. How Long did it play? That is the one thing people leave out of the conversation.

I was told that you can bring anything in if you have the time. Lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's just not fair! Great catch, can't imagine reeling it in. How Long did it play? That is the one thing people leave out of the conversation.

I was told that you can bring anything in if you have the time. Lol

 

No more than ten minutes. We use heavy leaders/tippets, redfish aren't leader shy. Then crank down the drag and just put the heat on. As Capt Bob said, some fish boogie and some don't, redfish don't boogie, they bog down and run in short spurts.

 

I like that Bob, some boogie and some don't.

 

Kirk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We fish for false albacore (bonito in some locales) from the rocks and in the inlets in RI, and I don't believe I've ever seen one that didn't get into the backing, the vast majority of them well in. Most of us use 20-pound fluoro tippets, and a tight drag means the risk of a broken rod even if the tippet holds up. A ten-pounder will be into the backing in a matter of seconds. Atlantic bonito are another story - they're more prone to zipping back and forth without making long runs, and I've landed some that never went more than 50 feet from the rocks. Dealing with surf and heavy current requires a more delicate touch than you'll need from a boat most of the time. When the albacore are blitzing, you'll see a tremendous number of break-offs from the less-experienced anglers because they'll often try to put the brakes on before the fish has had a chance to tire. Like Captain Bob said, you've got to consider the strain that water pressure puts on your leader, not just the size of the fish. No fish can pull its own weight in the water, but there are other factors you have to consider as well when you're setting your drag.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ahh the old 'broken rod' glad someone mentioned that, as i did this last week. And that brings my total this season to 3 breakages and 1 lost. Not sure if i am proud or ashamed.

 

You might notice after breaking it i tried to just ram it back together as i wanted to keep fishing, but that really wasn't going to work.

 

post-29540-0-63108000-1347636204_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ahh the old 'broken rod' glad someone mentioned that, as i did this last week. And that brings my total this season to 3 breakages and 1 lost. Not sure if i am proud or ashamed.You might notice after breaking it i tried to just ram it back together as i wanted to keep fishing, but that really wasn't going to work.post-29540-0-63108000-1347636204_thumb.jpg

 

Wow, three broken rods and the season ain't over yet? Hey Jammer, you might want to think about cutting back on the anabolic steroids, at least until winter sets in. Seriously, when I was a kid, we always had a spawning run of big suckers (8-10 pounds) that coincided with the opening of the trout season. A buddy of mine who was using a Zebco outfit hooked a big one that got out into the current and broke his line. Unable to stand the vicious ribbing he was getting from his angling associates, he marched up to the store, came back with a spool of 27-pound test mono and crammed as much as he could onto his reel. (I suspect it was about 30 feet) He immediately hooked another sucker in the current and yanked back with enough force to drive a 10/0 hook into a 1000-pound bluefin tuna, snapping the rod clean in half and landing him on his sorry ass. I don't know what happened to the fish, since I was busy rolling on the ground in a fit of hysterics, wetting my pants and trying to breathe. I couldn't stop laughing long enough to eat supper for at least a week, and my pal decided that he'd had enough of fishing for a while and took up tennis until the whole thing had more or less blown over and the rest of us had grown up and gone off to college. The last I heard, he was still fishing, although he's never lived down that episode and I'm sure is scarred for life. (it probably explains why he only fishes remote areas from a boat these days) Silly as the whole fiasco was, he taught me the importance of a balanced outfit and a light touch, a lesson I've never forgotten. One never knows where valuable information is going to come from.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We do break our share of rods on my skiff.. Funny thing - they're rarely broken on a fish, mostly everything from big feet on down. If you're anywhere near us you'll hear my telling my anglers not to "high stick" when there's a good fish getting close to the skiff, then to "give with your arms if there's any sudden surges when the fish is close.

 

We needed every bit of luck and skill last night after my angler hooked a monster snook on a 10wt. I still don't believe the size of that fish (my own personal best on fly was only 22lbs. Later on today once I've had some sleep I'll post up a report and the rest of the details but I think the fish may have been as much as 30lbs - I have pictures.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure if there is any correlation or i am onto something, but both brands and models of rods i have broken this year have been Korean made blanks, now 1 of the brands i own an American built blank and it seems indestructable, i had a fish swim around behind me catching my line on my backpack and basically tie the rod into a pretzel which it recovered from, it has been abused for 8 years with no issues, but i am finding the Korean made stuff a bit 'sketchy' and tend to break within 1 season. *shrug*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...