Jump to content
Fly Tying
Homer35805

Dubbing Brushes

Recommended Posts

Greetings,

 

I don't know if you all have already done this, but I just found a good way to avoid purchasing copper wire to make dubbing brushes . I just took, and I am sure you all have many of these laying around the house/garage, an old power cable from a computer, stripped the outer casing off, and took the individual wires within the bundle (there were three different wires, black, white and green) and separated them. I then took one wire(the black one), cut it into about 14" lengths(folded in two to get a 7" dubbing brush), and then stripped the outer cover off, leaving a bundle of thin copper wires. A single copper wire from this bundle of copper strands can be used, but they are very delicate, and you might find that the wire breaks off before you are done spinning the brush, especially if you use a power drill to spin the brush.

 

I found that 4-5 strands of the thin copper wire is sufficient for a good dubbing brush because it allows you to spin the brush real tight, without breaking it at either end before you are done spinning the brush. I also found, that creating your own dubbing block to spin brushes is easier than it looks, and makes using the thin strands within the wire easier to attach, add your dubbing material, and then spin together. If you have as many old power cords around the house as I do (because I never throw a good power cord away, you never know when you might have to rewire a lamp or something), you will never have to buy copper wire (or any wire as you can color the copper wire with SHarpie permanent markers) again, and you can spin dubbing brushes until the cows come home. Well, if they have left home that is.

 

Anway, I hope this helps someone out there who is running out of copper wire and wants to spin a dubbing brush. The single strands do make for good ribbing material too, so, now, two uses for the old power cords in your house.

 

Enjoy and happy tying. Tight lines too.

 

 

Sez me,

 

Homer_in_AL

 

:ph34r:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Homer, if you tie small flies and need wire for ribbing; use the wire from the phones cord that plugs into the wall....finer than a human hair so you may have to double it too...

Murray

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A solenoid out of a car has good wire in it also. Different ones has different sizes of wire. I have a few spools that is similar to the wire that lykos33 spoke of, almost as fine as a hair. Be careful if you try this because some of the housings are hard to get into and a couple have made me bleed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plus, Netabrookie, I am sure the people whose car you get the solenoids aren't too happy. joking of course.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

when using an electrical cord for wire (old tip have used it for years) leave about a 1/2 inch or so of insulation on he wire and then just snip off a strand when needed

 

copperwire.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried this last night and got the crap shocked out of me. I guess the cord has to be unplugged before you strip the wires? :ph34r:

 

 

;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The OLD ribbon cable used in desktop computers is made up of 70 individual strands of wire each strand has about 7 or 8 copper wires in the micro bundle. Very thin, and some will be silvered. These cables are no longer used for connecting the hard drives to the motherboard, so they will start getting hard to find. Computer repair shops, and recycle center for electronics should have them.

 

Common house hold appliance cords, and extension cords are good sources of slightly heavier copper. The electric dryer cords have even thicker strands. Since you are forced to buy a new one, save your old one to strip down.

 

As Cream learned, be sure your cords are unplugged before you start stripping them down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are all good sources but keep your eyes open for elecrtic motor repair shops. They often have bulk spools of copper. 30-36 guage is an ideal range. No doubling required. Its cheaper than buying spools of commercial tying wire. A 1lb spool will tie thousands of brushes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are going to use it as ribbing and the wire is a bit dark soak it in some lemon juice or a vinager solution for a few hours to overnight, it makes it shiny.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

.....also, some small electric motors (the kind from toys) have red, blue or orange windings on the stator so you can have different colors

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...