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Lance Kekel

Naming Flies

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Thanks This has all been VERY helpful!

 

I did a search on Bob Popovics and the Bob Pop reference is out there just enough that I probably ought to reconsider the "Pop" naming on the front end and consider using either my first or last name. I was initially a little uncomfortable about puting my name on it like that at the time I started it seemed to lack a little modesty. I definitely want to promote my tying so that people would remember when looking for my flies, I just felt a little goofy going that route. I've always been happy to share but sometimes a little bashful on things like this.

 

I actually did think seriously about the "Black and Blue" name at one point but it seemed so simple with all of the other names out there that I figured I needed to jazz it up a little. Maybe not?

 

Thanks again everyone. :)

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Look at Kelly Galloup

 

Sex Dungeon

 

T n A Rainbow

 

Butt Sump

 

Butt Monkey

 

Stacked Blonde

 

 

Here is my advice-

 

If you are tying for shops, that aren't going to enter into a printed catalogue, keep it simple. Unless you are really reinventing the wheel, I would avoid the elaborate names. Stick to the name that they generally are, with either a prefix or some very short descriptive. If you are using new materials, or materials in a different way or order, or all of the above, go out on a limb and give it a name. Don't go crazy, unless it is a streamer. Crazy and streamers, especially if they are articulated, go hand in hand.

 

I went through this not too long ago, where I entered a shop, purchased some materials and saw somebody tying flies. He showed me his flies that he was selling, and it was a pheasant tail, say size 16-22, with a black thin skin wing case, and a bit of flashy dubbing. Nothing special, looked good, but everybody has a million variations of this fly. I commented, thats a good variation. He responded, "Of what, that is my fly...the name is XYZ". (I won't say how silly the name was.)

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Flies can be trademarked as one of the local fisherman in Charleston has patented a few of his own. On bad fly names today I saw the Mangina ... thought that was pretty unique. Anyways good luck I like the free flies for name assist that was thrown out. Good luck

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I am sure i have left a few out...umm 'booby'

 

A rather large directory, funny place...Had a 'nice' dinner there once in a lovely restaurant which one would think to be normal, had our meals and the waitress invited my buddy to go back to her house and snort cocaine, she said this openly in front of all of us like it is the 'usual' thing to do. :blink:

 

Actaully we seen some mad stuff in Montreal now that i am starting to remember...

 

More than likely, she knew you were tourists and had a couple of hulking associates standing by to relieve you of your assets. Either that or she was dumber than a doorstop. There's a name for people who advertise the fact that they're holding - I believe they're called "inmates."

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For the skeptics about flies being patented, the Waterwisp flies are patented, as are the "official" hooks they are tied on.

 

All this means is that if you tie them, you cannot "legally" sell them. You can tie them for yourself, and others, all you want; just give them away!

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patenting flies is absolutely ridiculous, and is ego at the highest level. and of all the flies to be patented, those stupid waterwisps are? wow...good thing is, eventually patents run out.

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Flies can be trademarked as one of the local fisherman in Charleston has patented a few of his own.

2 different things/processes??

 

http://www.noreklaw.com/patents_vs_trademarking.htm

 

 

jim teeny patented the "teeny nymph"

 

even lee wulff

 

http://www.google.com/patents?id=q5odAAAAEBAJ&printsec=abstract&zoom=4#v=onepage&q&f=false

 

http://www.patentgenius.com/patent/5127183.html

 

http://www.patentgenius.com/image/4777759-2.html

 

even methods are patented

 

http://www.patentgenius.com/patent/6212817.html

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Flies can be trademarked as one of the local fisherman in Charleston has patented a few of his own.

2 different things/processes??

 

http://www.noreklaw.com/patents_vs_trademarking.htm

 

 

jim teeny patented the "teeny nymph"

 

even lee wulff

 

http://www.google.com/patents?id=q5odAAAAEBAJ&printsec=abstract&zoom=4#v=onepage&q&f=false

 

http://www.patentgenius.com/patent/5127183.html

 

http://www.patentgenius.com/image/4777759-2.html

 

even methods are patented

 

http://www.patentgenius.com/patent/6212817.html

 

As far as I know, the trademark has to do with the name and the patent concerns the invention itself. Poland Spring has their name trademarked, but I doubt they hold a patent on water. Somebody else invented that, or so I've heard. ;)

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A writer once told me that Copyrighting a fly name is the easiest and cheapest way of protecting at least the name even though the pattern would not be trademarked, the name identifying that pattern would be - for what its worth. Although I've never worried about doing that.

 

I believe Tony Accardo had patents on many of his cork bodied bugs and some flies. I talked to him at a sportsman's show many years ago and he had a book with drawings and the patent approvals and such. Pretty interesting.

 

Kirk

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I like to tinker and "create" "new" flies. I say it that way becuase as others have said, most flies are built off ideas already in use and simply are variations.

 

One fly I gave a name to is "the little red nymph" I tied it, gave it to a buddy, he caught a bunch of fish, and said "that little red nymph is great". Thus, probably 20 years later the fly is still "the little red nymph". (ironically it's actually brown with chartruse flashabou rib and olive tail/wingcase/legs... so it's not even RED!)

 

My point, if you came up with it without knowledge of another's similar fly, call it what you would like, ideally, based on a story or simple looks as others have said.

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You would call the flies "Pop's xxxx variant".

For instance: the "Pops Clouser Variant" -- means its basically a clouser pattern but differs in some way.

You could also have "Variant 1, Variant 2, etc." Thus the same clouser variant in red or blue or chartreuse has its own identifier.

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Hey Coach ... I like the "Variant 1, Variant 2" idea ... but keep it simpler. Any fly tied on a #14 or smaller hook would be the "Bob's Tiny F*#(ing fly 1, 2, etc."

Any fly tied on a 4/0 or larger hook would be a "Bob's Giant F*#(ing fly 1, 2, etc" and son on and so forth.

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Lance-Forget all the politics of it,just have fun naming them. I named one after a customer that was the first to try it out,his brother came back the next day and said "that dumb ass tore it up" named it "D.A.Caddis". My best seller I named it "Drymerger" because I felt it was a cross between a dry and a emerger.

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Lance,

whatever you name them keep them simple, like flytire suggested Pops black and blue. I have about a dozen patterns that I sell that are of my onw design that have been named. Non by me, mostly by guys at the shops I tie for. One pattern is a caddis pupa pattern that I first tied up for a shop called Yankee outdoors, the owner started to call it the yank-me pupa and it stuck. I have not put any prefix such steveo's or cthighlands in front of any of my patterns do to the fact that I feel as fly tier does that there a few if any truly new patterns and to change a simple thing and then put your name on it kind of does not sit well with me. But that is the best part of this whole sport to each his own and you do what is best for your business. At the erging of a good friend and industry rep I recently submitted most all of my patterns to a national distributor for consideration to be added to their catalog. One of the first questions after seeing them was what are the names. They guy I talked to laughed because I was reluctant to come up with a prefix, as almost all flies distributed thru large comapnies get them to set them apart. I still have not decided because for a long long time I have kind of looked down at the fact that some people throw their name on a fly that is basically an established pattern with a couple of minor changes made to it more for credibilty than anything else. That being said good luck naming your patterns and again keep it simple so people can remember it. cute names like sex dungen, to bit hooker are great but some of the best are just so simple, Lefties deciever for example.

 

good luck,

 

Steve

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While we're on the subject of naming flies here's an interesting observation. Due to professional relocation etc. I have not been doing any tying or fly fishing for more than 40 years. After retirement and back into trout country I have begun to do both. I am amazed at the number of patterns out there now that I never heard of. I was comparing an old Orvis catalog I had with one today with many more new patterns. I read a recent article about the Blue Winged Olive and the pictures in the article don't look anything like the Blue Winged Olive I knew from the old Streamside Guide (Art Flick).

If I recall correctly, 40 years ago you had to be somewhat "famous" to name a fly, Lee Wulff etc.. A hall of famer. Some of the flies I see today look more like something to go in a frame rather than in my fly box. Well, obviously I'm behind the curve. If the new patterns are good for the sport then so be it. Personally I liked it the way it was - sorry. Just an interesting observation by an old timer.

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