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Chefben4

Some weekend stuff

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Didnt have too much time at the vise this weekend but I managed to get out a couple. Still trying to get some better pictures with my camera. I bought a light box that came with 2 lights, backdrops, etc.. I used it today and im just disappointed. Maybe Im expecting to much from the old point and shoot. In any case, they are good enough for you to get the idea. Enjoy!

 

Still messing with the "Random Baitfish" pattern I posted last week. This one Ill call the flashy mullet.

SAM_0101.jpg

 

SAM_0103.jpg

 

And of course cannot forget my new obsession. Guinea Hackle! Here is a little slider for the reds.

SAM_0109.jpg

 

SAM_0115.jpg

 

I saw this fly in a picture on a "Fly of the week" site or something like that. Thought it was pretty cool. Bonefish Mai Tai

SAM_0118.jpg

 

SAM_0127.jpg

 

Another random baitfish. Messing around "spinning" heads with congo hair. This bug has neck hackle, marabou, congo hair, some lead wraps! All sorts of stuff

SAM_0130.jpg

 

SAM_0134.jpg

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Flies look good! The photos look good, looks like its shooting with a shallow depth of field; it is picking a focus point on the tailing materials in some shots looks to me. Did you use the self timer? The lighting is really good. Sometimes, you have to put something dominate such as a sheet of foam with the edge next to the point on the fly that you want in focus. The focus should jump to the edge and focus. Check the manual and see if you can move the focus box around with the left/right/up/down dial on the back (that's where it is on my P&S).

You'll be a pro with the camera before you know it, just takes some trial and error like fly tying; the more you use it, the better you'll get to know it. When you pick up up the Owner's Manual after fooling with the camera for a little while, it will make much more sense.

 

Keep up the good work,

Kirk

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Flies look good! The photos look good, looks like its shooting with a shallow depth of field; it is picking a focus point on the tailing materials in some shots looks to me. Did you use the self timer? The lighting is really good. Sometimes, you have to put something dominate such as a sheet of foam with the edge next to the point on the fly that you want in focus. The focus should jump to the edge and focus. Check the manual and see if you can move the focus box around with the left/right/up/down dial on the back (that's where it is on my P&S).

You'll be a pro with the camera before you know it, just takes some trial and error like fly tying; the more you use it, the better you'll get to know it. When you pick up up the Owner's Manual after fooling with the camera for a little while, it will make much more sense.

 

Keep up the good work,

Kirk

 

Thanks Kirk. I am indeed having trouble with the focus point. I had a few choice words yesterday when I was taking pictures. I do use the self timer quite a bit. Not on all shots, but some. Im gonna do some more reading in the manual to see what I can do. It does have "manual" mode as well so I could probably play with it a bit there. Learning is part of the fun (yet sometimes frustrating!).

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That first bug looks like something that would get a lot of attention on the night scene in my area.... I can add one or two tips as well for your photos. The first is simple.. you can get a lot of difference in any closeup with different backgrounds. What I'm using is simply sheets of craft foam (3mm)in different colors. Any hobby store will usually carry them, they're very cheap, and you can get a variety of different looks by simply changing sheet colors (without moving your camera, vise, or anything else) I often take two or three shots and just vary the background for different effects. Lastly, using a timer while the camera is in a sturdy tripod eliminates any possibility of camera movement -once you trip the timer and step away you've pretty much eliminated any operator problems. Working on depth of field is difficult (and at times I struggle with it as well). Good luck on that....

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That first bug looks like something that would get a lot of attention on the night scene in my area.... I can add one or two tips as well for your photos. The first is simple.. you can get a lot of difference in any closeup with different backgrounds. What I'm using is simply sheets of craft foam (3mm)in different colors. Any hobby store will usually carry them, they're very cheap, and you can get a variety of different looks by simply changing sheet colors (without moving your camera, vise, or anything else) I often take two or three shots and just vary the background for different effects. Lastly, using a timer while the camera is in a sturdy tripod eliminates any possibility of camera movement -once you trip the timer and step away you've pretty much eliminated any operator problems. Working on depth of field is difficult (and at times I struggle with it as well). Good luck on that....

 

Thanks for the tips! Last week I bought two sheets (tan and white). They are "ok". Maybe not the right color for the flies I was trying. Will try some more.

 

Im glad im not the only one with depth of field trouble!

 

I also learned that with my camera, since its WIFI, I can use my cell phone as a view finder and remote for the camera. Maybe I will try that out!

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Most of your point and shoot cameras have a center weighted focas and light meter. On some cameras you can fool the camera by focasing or getting the light setting by pointing the camera in whatever direction needed and them pushing the button half way down which will hold the setting you desire and then moving the camera to frame the picture desired and then finishing pushing the button. Don't forget that you have to hold the shutter button in the half way position while you are framing the desired pic and then finish the shutter button depression. Even high dollar slr's can be fooled in the this way when used in auto mode. there is always more than one way to skin a cat....hehehe

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Most of your point and shoot cameras have a center weighted focas and light meter. On some cameras you can fool the camera by focasing or getting the light setting by pointing the camera in whatever direction needed and them pushing the button half way down which will hold the setting you desire and then moving the camera to frame the picture desired and then finishing pushing the button. Don't forget that you have to hold the shutter button in the half way position while you are framing the desired pic and then finish the shutter button depression. Even high dollar slr's can be fooled in the this way when used in auto mode. there is always more than one way to skin a cat....hehehe

 

Thanks for the tips!

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DOF can be a nightmare with macro work because you so often have virtually none...

best thing is to stop down to f16 or smaller aperture if you can-even if you have to push the ISO up a touch and move away from the subject slightly.

This will give you more DOF and if you shoot RAW you;ll still get an acceptable final image after cropping to make the fly fill the frame.

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