Jump to content
Fly Tying
throwinflys

whiting introductory hackle pack

Recommended Posts

Dumb question time... What is the difference in tying abilities of a saddle and a cape?

When people talk about dry fly saddles they usually are referring to genetic saddles that have much longer feathers with very consistent barb length and count along the shaft. The feathers are long enough that you can often tie 5 or more flys from each one. The trade off is that you do not get the same variety of sizes in a saddle that you get on a cape. I only buy capes because I like having the flexability in terms of size and I also like to use the wider spade feathers at the edges for tailing. If I know I need to tie a bunch of one dry fly pattern, I get a Whiting 100 pack which is made up of pre-selected saddle feathers. Other folks like to buy saddles. As long as you fly floats and catches fish you can use either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Flytier, if you don't have any hackles, the Whiting Intro pack is a good choice. The hackles are good (tyer's grade) quality, and you won't be disappointed.

 

On the other hand, Charlie Collins has a 4-cape commercial grab bag for $60. He picks the colors, but if you call Charlie, and tell him that you are a beginning tier, and need basic colors, he'll take care of you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That's a good example to show. Is the commercial grade similar to Bronze or is it pro grade?

I think it is similar to bronze, but I have never compared them. Commercial (from this supplier) is at the lower end of the price range. I think there was one grade lower.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. I'm looking at buying a new dry cape and have been trying to compare the pro-grade, bronze and silver on line and its impossible. But seeing that feather and reading the Whitings page I think I will just go with the cape that is in my price range and hook size range. Don't think I'll be dissapointed with any of them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

]i got my hackle on friday and i'm very pleased with this intro pack. all the hackles are in good shape and there are PLENTY for me to get started. also j.stockard had them shipped for free in 3 days. very happy with this purchase

 

post-46167-0-53805700-1358805176_thumb.jpg

 

post-46167-0-93677600-1358805233_thumb.jpg

 

post-46167-0-42800000-1358805261_thumb.jpg

 

post-46167-0-32829600-1358805284_thumb.jpg

 

post-46167-0-30959500-1358805328_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

flytire, not sure what I was thinking. Haha, guess it was too early in the morning or late @ night smile.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


 

 

The picture below shows 2 #14 feathers plucked off 2 capes. I pulled the first #14s that I found. On the left is a feather from the Whiting intro pack, and on the right is a feather from a full commercial grade cape that cost about $30 this past November. Things to notice, the left side has significantly more fluff at the bottom that has to be stripped off for dry fly use, has a lower barb count and thicker barbs, and an overall shorter useful length. While these points make it a less desirable feather, all in all, it is okay and I can tie a good dry fly with this feather. But also, notice the shaft of the feathers. The left side shaft is thicker, which will make it harder to wrap and more difficult to lay in close wraps. Also notice that the right hand side of the feather on the left is lifting from the surface. this is because there is a twist in the shaft that will have to be compensated for as it is wound. These issues, in my opinion, are significant for the beginner.

 

Mike.

hacklecomparison.jpg

 

 

 

FrequentTyer raises the conundrum for a beginner fly tyer and buying any kind of biologic tying material. Grading is the key and there is a difference between buying prepackaged material and an experienced fly tyer cherry picking his materials.

 

He doesn't even mention that the barring is far superior on the feather on the right. Look at the bottom of the feather where the barbs are not splayed. The black is blacker and the color separation is crisper.

 

Grading fly tying materials is as steep learning curve. I totally agree with FT, that an experienced tyer can choose superior materials at any given price point. Even with "premium" necks or saddles, there is a difference. A grader is not perfect and they make mistakes that can result in under or over grading hackle. An experienced tyer picks out the under graded hackle to get the best buy. But a beginner cannot do this UNLESS he has an experienced fly tyer that will hand pick materials for him.

 

I never buy hackle without opening the packaging and examining the neck or saddle. Looking through the packaging is not enough.

 

I am at the point where I buy "pro" quality saddles and necks. I can choose the size, coloration, and compare what is for sale to what I already have and what I am looking for. If I want to tie an adams for example, I need matching brown and grizzly hackle, and I can buy the saddles that are a good match for each other in the size I want.

 

Before the hair extension craze, vendors would have litterally hundreds of necks and saddle in bins to be picked through. A lot of bargains could be found.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...