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brianbailey1000

CDC Comparadun Colors

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I want to add some CDC comparaduns with Biot bodies to my quiver. I have Blue Dun CDC, wondering what everyone else likes for wing color. A lot of recipes call for natural dun, but it seems a little dark to me, darker than the Blue Dun. Think I'm gonna get some Tan and Light Dun.

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Hi Brian,

 

You can take this for what it's worth, but I wouldn't bother with wings made of CDC for anything. They look fantastic when dry and fluffy in all the pics that are out there. If you fish with them, you'll quickly discover that once wet, they turn into a thin wisp that's very hard to see if it's more than 20 feet out on a stream. I really like CDC for patterns that are palmered for ribbing, like a cdc & elk, or a henryville special, for under parachutes, useing it in emergers in front of the wing on the bottom like a Rosenbauer pattern, and even in some nymph patterns where you would tie hen hackle to represent legs. It holds some air and imparts movement very well. It's just not that good at keeping a heavy anchor of a hook afloat along with a tippet for very long.

 

Stick with deer or elk hair for the wing on a Comparadun, and you won't have to worry about why you can't see it after a few casts. You can even palmer it on the body of a Comparadun to make it that much more effective on slower waters/pools.

 

Regards,

Mark

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I have to disagree with Mark.I use cdc and biot c/duns on a regular basis with very good results.I have found the best thing to keep them afloat is dry magic or a powder like rio agent x or frogs fanny.We all has likes and dislikes of certain patterns and should judge for ourselves whether to carry them or not.

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Brian,

 

I definitely tend to use the light dun-colored cdc on my Comparadun wings when using cdc (which I also use as an underwing on many caddis patterns). This does vary based on the pattern (i.e. I prefer a darker color when tying the Slate Drake Comparadun, which is no problem to see since the fly is a larger pattern).

 

In terms of fishing cdc, there is an extensive amount written about the material over the years, thus I will simply say that cdc can be a pain once submerged (or after landing a fish), but it is one of my go-to materials when fishing over finicky trout in situations where they can examine the pattern. Once wet, I will dry the fly by squeezing it in a chamois, and then place it in an liquid-based mixture I use (similar to the Bergman formula). Once dry, the fly will float perfectly for more than an ample amount of time. I also do use Dry Magic, which I was first turned onto by Rusty Gates years ago; it's one of the few floatants that do not seem to alter the natural qualities of cdc.

 

I just posted a new YouTube video tying a Sparkle Dun with deer hair wings, but you'll notice that at the beginning I go into some detail regarding the color of that hair (which speaks to your "wonderings" regarding wing color).

 

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I use CDC for wings on most of my dries. LOVE it for that. It floats like a cork if you don't splash it down (like anything else) I dry it with a chamois. I treat it with Frogs Fanny from time to time. I also like Bergmans liquid for treatment after drying it with chamois. Mostly though, it stays dry and floats high, and I can see it better than any other matterial. Its very light, so it lands softly too. I use white, black, light dun, dark dun, pale yellow and a couple shades of tan for dries imitating mayflies, caddis, and smaller stones. It makes for a great yellow sally wing. Spinner wings too. The best caddis wing out there.

 

I say try it, you'll like it. In my case, its the first material I go to when thinking about wings for anything. For your original question, yes, its a perfect wing material for biot comparaduns. Killer fly. Don't get too caught up in color. Its either light or dark for the most part, and tie both, that way you can change "wings" based on the glare off the water. I've done very well with black-winged patterns on brightly reflective water (like white-cloudy days) because the fly is so visible. Visibility=good drifts and good presentations. If its dark, I like white wings. The trout see more silouette than color of materials above/out of the water.

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Thanks all for your comments. Light, medium and dark should cover it all! On a similar note, I have been tying some black winged cripples (with EP Fibers) and look forward to seeing how they look on the water.

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