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breambuster

Thinking About A Canoe

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I was in Academy Sports today and a canoe like this one struck my eye:

 

http://www.academy.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10151_10051_548704_-1?color=Green&ICID=CRT:0142-02118-2800

 

It's considerably wider than a regular canoe. It looked to me like it might be close to 3 feet wide. It also has a transom on the back and is rated for a gasoline motor of up to 4 HP. The place where I do most of my fishing is a sheltered cove off a large hydro-electric reservoir. "Lake Hartwell" in NW South Carolina. So far, I mostly fish for bluegills, but crappie are also a real possibility in that cove. I have just discovered where the brush pile is. ;-) If I get one of these, I will probably only use an electric motor on it. Also, if it seems stable enough, I might venture around the point and into a second cove, not as sheltered, but with a LONG bank that looks good to me for 'gills. What I really would like, though, is to talk to someone who already has a canoe just like this one. Anyone out there got one? How about one that is very similar?

 

Thanks

 

BB

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I flyfished out of a canoe like that for a quite a while it was very stable I used to stand on the seat so I could see into the water better. It was a little rough to paddle in the wind but you should have no problems with a motor. I don't think I would get it into any heavy waves like above maybe 2 footers

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Those canoes are very heavy. There is nothing wrong with a canoe but as with all things They Are Not All Created Equal. I have spent many hours in canoes and I like them but I just recently bought a used fishing kayak. Do a little research and you will find that several of the sit-on-top yaks are designed to stand up fishing and they weigh less than the canoe you are looking at. In most states you have to register a boat with any kind of motor. There is nothing wrong with using a paddle. Man has been doing it for thousands of years. There are also solo canoes that are outstanding boats but they cost more than the one you are looking at. There are also some canoes that can be used solo and by two paddlers. You pays your money and you takes your pick. If you do decide to get a canoe like you listed above there are always used ones for sale cheap that have little to no use. The only drawback I see for the yaks is the weight and they weigh less than 80#.

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I am done with canoes but kayak is the way to go and is better geared for fishing.

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Second the gheenoe.....I am still looking at the possibility.

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I am done with canoes but kayak is the way to go and is better geared for fishing.

 

I agree with this: kayak is faster & safer than a canoe, and much easier to carry if a portage is necessary.

 

I am using the Timan inflatable kayak built by Drakar (Lithuania). It is 12' long, 3' wide, and weights only 20+ pounds.

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I have a Hobie Outback Kayak. It has a rudder and I can pedal it, has tons of storage and goes anywhere I ask it to go. It is a 1 person kayak and still weighs in around 60-65 lbs. but I can get it loaded easily onto my truck rack. I also have a set of wheels that fit into the scupper holes for easy portage.

 

I use it on slow rivers and many lakes and will use my fly rod and spincast - usually will take both rods with me.

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I've used Coleman canoes for both duck and moose hunting. The Scanoe appears to be of very similar construction so I'll throw out some of my experiences and observations. They have some pros and cons. On the plus side is their price and good stability. They're quieter and warmer than an aluminum canoe. You can beat them up and leave them out in the weather and not feel too bad about it. I've dragged them here and there and left lots of curly cues of hull material behind. On the negative side, they're HEAVY and paddle like a bathtub. If you don't have too far to go from truck to water and don't have to travel a long way, it may be the canoe for you. Remember you basically have to press the canoe above your head to get it off a roof rack. I eventually wound up with a Kevlar Mad River Tripper which did well with on rivers, lakes and portaging. Of course, you could get a handful of Coleman canoes for the same price. You generally don't leave an expensive Kevlar canoe out in the weather for long periods of time. The wood trim also required some oil now and then. I once paddled an entire quartered moose across Big River Lakes in a Coleman canoe. It didn't have much freeboard but I made it. It really depends on what you want to do with the canoe. Lastly, I've owned double and square end canoes and used outboard engines from time to time. I personally thought it was easier to have a double end canoe with side mount motor than a square ender. With a square end canoe, you have to either have your motor hand around the middle of your back or sit side saddle. I found a side mount easier and more comfortable. A friend of mine always disagreed with me. I'm hoping to try one of the new fishing oriented kayaks soon.

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Thanks, guys, for the replies. I've been out of town this week without internet access so I'm just now reading your posts. Let me explain a little more about the canoe. I have an inflatable 1 person pontoon boat that I can use in warmer weather for fishing. My wife was talking about us getting a PADDLE BOAT and I am hoping to steer her in another direction. She wants us to try fishing out of the paddle boat. I'm talking about the things that they have at the park where you sit side by side and peddle some bicycle pedals to get the thing to go, and I'm thinking that there has GOT to be a better way. So the craft I'm thinking about will have to accomodate 2 people. I am 64 and she is 61 so we are NOT looking for something that will be constantly dunking us in the water. I have limited funds and I don't want to go into debt for a 15 foot bass boat and a 175 HP motor. I do have an electric motor and battery and when I saw a canoe that was about $500 that looked nice and wide, with a flat bottom and a place on the back for an electric motor or even up to 4 HP gasoline motor, (maybe, eventually) I thought it looked like a pretty good deal.

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I like canoes for paddling not motoring because I do not have a hand in the middle of my back as already stated. I also don't like the side mount cause it can make you tip if you hit something. My motors seem to be rock magnets. I would take a motor powered canoe over a paddle boat any day. Have you ever driven a paddle boat? They are pure hard work and they go nowhere. Complete junk.

 

I would simply get a 12 foot utility vee boat over a motorized canoe or a paddle boat. They are a dime a dozen on the used market.

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