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frogeyes

Barbless hooks

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Just put an order in at Allen Fly Fishing and got me a bunch of barbless hooks. I have never used barbless before but all the people I talk to and videos I watch they are useing them. What are the benifets of using them? Also I seen that they had their own type of fly line has anyone used them?

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What are the benifets of using them?

 

they are cheaper in price than any other brand of barbless hooks out there

 

the come out of the fishes lips without ripping any flesh

 

they come out of human skin without ripping any flesh

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I find it saves a lot of time using barbless, saves from having to pinch the barb every time you tie a fly. Maybe I'm wrong but I tend to believe the less squeezing and pinching a hook with pliers the better, In some cases weakening the hook.

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The biggest advantage is in releasing fish. Much less (sometimes no,) damage is done removing a barbless hook. You may loose the occasional fish, but you have already won since the fish took your fly in the first place.

 

There are some who feel that a barbless hook can cause more damage than a barbed hook when playing a fish. Their theory is that the barbless hooks can move about when playing a fish. The hook can come part way out, and then re-set itself in a slightly different path many times during the fight.

 

While that may be the case, I still feel that the barbless hook causes significantly less damage during the hook removal. I do know that removing barbless hooks from yourself is MUCH less problem, but I don't know about the how the fish sees it.

 

Yes it does same a little time in not having to pinch barbs, and you will obviously not have an issue with damaging the hooks.

 

There are some places that require that all hooks used be barbless. I usually tie several boxes marked a such for these locations. I even keep a couple of boxes of "Yellowstone" nymphs that are weighted without lead.

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I'd add that it is easier getting them out of a net (if you don't have a rubber bag), clothing, and rugs (sorting flies while watching TV).

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After using barbless hooks for my pike fishing bait, lures and flies for over 15years I have never worried that they cause more damage. The only exception has been with large single 2/0< on spinner baits. I have had these go right through the top jaw which was very awkward to get out. Barbed ones never seem to sink in much past the area behind the barb. Again dozens and dozens of pike caught and only a handful with an issue. Use barbless with confidence and change if you feel the need to.

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Several people have mentioned the most obvious advantage of barbless hooks, which is that they are much easier to remove not only from a fish's mouth, but also from human skin/muscle tissue, clothing, net bags, etc. This is unquestionably true.

 

What no one has mentioned yet (unless I just missed it) is that they also penetrate the skin/bone/cartilage of the fish's mouth more readily than do barbed hooks because the angle of the barb offers considerable resistance to the force of the hookset. You have to apply enough force overcome that resistance to drive the hook in past the barb in order for the hook to hold. Barbless hooks offer a twofold advantage here: 1) higher hookup rate, and 2) greater protection of light tippets (less forceful hookset=fewer broken tippets).

 

I fish barbless because I believe that to use barbed hooks for catch-and-release fishing is to prioritize the landing of the fish and the opportunity to handle it (both of which further decrease the chance of post-release survival, by the way) over the well-being of the fish and, by extension, the fishery. Of course, you could say the exact same thing about the very act of fishing (with any kind of hook), period, so we all have to decide for ourselves how to reconcile the good or pleasure that we derive from fishing and the amount of damage we potentially do by fishing. I mention all this only because you asked what the advantages of fishing barbless were, and, to me, this is one of them: the knowledge that I'm doing less damage to the fish I catch.

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Well, Bryon, your reasons almost make me want to go barbless ... almost.

Hey, that's cool. They're just that: my reasons. I don't expect them to be everyone's, nor do I think they necessarily should be. Like I said, we each have to arrive at our own justification for doing what we do.

 

Full disclosure - I've been known to leave the barbs on when, for one reason or another, I decided that I really needed to land a fish if I hooked him. Once it was when I was competing in the Fly Rod & Reel "Trout Bum Tournament" and my partner told me that any fish I lost to one of my *%&$!!*! pansy barbless hooks I was going in after bum-over-teakettle, courtesy of him. I fished barbed that time -- it was the middle of the night and the water was very cold, very deep and full of a century's worth of drowned logs. I just compensated by not catching any fish. :)

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I fish barbless because I believe that to use barbed hooks for catch-and-release fishing is to prioritize the landing of the fish and the opportunity to handle it (both of which further decrease the chance of post-release survival, by the way) over the well-being of the fish and, by extension, the fishery. Of course, you could say the exact same thing about the very act of fishing (with any kind of hook), period, so we all have to decide for ourselves how to reconcile

 

where are you coming from, or going to with that? Apparently some folks use flies with the entire hook bend cut off. Supposedly the strike is the pinnacle of their idea of the sport... but it has been conclusively proven in peer-reviewed studies that such methods severely, and permanently damage the fishes' self esteem. After the strike, they feel sorry for themselves for being duped by a ball of fur and feathers, and feel depressed forever.

 

I fish barbless almost all the time, and I fish barbed hooks too, but only rarely. I have experienced absolutely NO difference in losing fish with barbless, and I fish for just about everything not just the Holy Trout. I see a large difference in the damage done to fish by unhooking barbed vs barbless hooks. I have caught more than a few bass with mangled, scarred, damaged mouths which were obviously caused by idiot fishermen ripping hooks out. I've seen them do it.

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I am in the minority on the barbless hook issue. Trout anglers have been brain washed to think that barbless hooks preserve trout populations. The single advantage of barbless hooks is if you hook yourself. There is no advantage in cold water, warm water or salt water fisheries to preserving fihs populations in a C&R fishery.

 

There is abundant scientific peer reviewed research that shows this to be true. I believe it is ignored because we think we are doing good for trout populations when we use barbless hooks.

 

The USA's best rout researcher, Robert Behnke, just passed away. He has written many times on barbless vs barbed hooks and his own research shows from a fish mortality standpoint, there is no advantage of barbless hooks over barbed hooks.

 

http://www.tu.org/blog-posts/dr-trout-rip-robert-behnke-1929-2013

 

From About Trout: The Best of Robert Behnke from Trout Magazine

By Robert J. Behnke, PhD

 

http://tinyurl.com/99p94vz

 

“The fisheries research studies in Yellowstone Park have also helped to dispel some long-established beliefs. Contrary to popular opinion, it is not necessary to restrict catch- and-release fisheries to barb-less flies only. A large proportion of Yellowstone anglers have only casual interest in fishing and are not highly skilled or experienced. Many use large treble hook lures. The trout they catch are frequently left flopping on the bank while a camera is dug out and photos taken. Yet survival of the released trout is exceedingly high (99.7 per cent) based on the 1981 study. Most all detailed comparative studies on hooking mortality have demonstratedno significant differences in mortality between trout caught on single, treble, barbed or barb-less hooks.”


The best scientific study on barbless vs barbed hook fly fishing mortality is the following article:

 

see pg. 72 of

 

http://www.wildtroutsymposium.com/proceedings-6.pdf

 

Barbed Hook Restrictions in Catch-and-Release Trout Fisheries: A Social Issue: by Schill and Scarpella

 

"For flies and lures combined, mean hooking mortality was 4.5% for barbed hooks and 4.2% for barbless hooks. Combination of test statistics from individual studies by gear type via meta-analysis yielded nonsignificant results for barbed versus barbless flies, lures, or flies and lures combined. We conclude that the use of barbed or barbless flies or lures plays no role in subsequent mortality of trout caught and released by anglers. Because natural mortality rates for wild trout in streams commonly range from 30% to 65% annually, a 0.3% mean difference in hooking mortality for the two hook types is irrelevant at the population level, even when fish are subjected to repeated capture. Based on existing mortality studies, there is no biological basis for barbed hook restrictions in artificial fly and lure fisheries for resident trout. Restricting barbed hooks appears to be a social issue."

 

The following are a series of articles that consistently show no demonstrable biological population survival advantage for barbless hooks for bait fishing and lures whether freshwater or saltwater. This is true for trout and other species as noted in the articles.

 

Effect of Hook Type on Mortality, Trauma, and Capture Efficiency of Wild, Stream-Resident Trout Caught by Active Baitfishing:

 

"Mortality at 72 h (2– 7%), anatomical hooking location (superficial or deep), and eye damage (5% of captures) in brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis did not differ between hook types. However, brook trout that were deeply hooked were more likely to die when barbed hooks were used. Mortality and eye damage in brown trout Salmo trutta were similarly low, but sample sizes were insufficient for comparison of hook types. Hook types did not differ significantly in terms of hooking efficiency, frequency of fish escape after hooking, or the mean unhooking time in which fish were held out of water."

 

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1577/M02-172.1

 

 

Hook Shedding and Mortality of Deeply Hooked Brook Trout Caught with Bait on Barbed and Barbless Hooks:

 

"Hook shedding at the end of the 6-week holding period averaged 20% and did not differ between hook types. Neither immediate mortality (average = 12.5%) nor mortality after 5 d (average = 20%) differed between hook types."

 

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1577/M06-276.1

 

Relative Hooking Mortality among Walleyes Caught on Barbed and Barbless Octopus Hooks and Barbed Jigs:

 

"Anglers sometimes use alternatives or modifications to J-shaped hooks to reduce hooking mortality in fish that are caught with live baits and then released. One such modification, the removal of barbs, has been evaluated for several fish species but (barbless) has shown little promise for reducing hooking mortality. ……. This study illustrates how gear type can affect hooking mortality based on the amount of damage caused when the fish is caught and adds to the body of literature indicating that the removal of barbs from hooks does not increase fish survival."

 

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02755947.2011.557944

 

Effect of Hook Type on Mortality, Trauma, and Capture Efficiency of Wild Stream Trout Caught by Angling with Spinners:

 

"This study assessed short-term (48-h) hooking mortality, eye damage, jaw injury, and capture efficiency of three species of wild stream trout caught on size-1 Mepps spinners having barbed or barbless treble or single hooks. …………. Barbless single hooks were quicker to remove than the other hook types, but the difference was insufficient to reduce mortality. Our results do not indicate a biological advantage with the use of single- or barbless-hook spinners when caught wild stream trout will be released.

 

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1577/M02-171.1

 

Performance of Barbed and Barbless Hooks in a Marine Recreational Fishery:

 

"In this fishery, barbless hooks probably did not reduce hooking mortality and conferred only slight benefits at the expense of reduced catches."

 

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi.....0.CO;2

 

The stiletto effect and the reason that treble hooks kill fewer fish that we would expect is documented in a Robert Behnke's book, About Trout.

 

There is, however a slight but consistent increase in mortality due to barb-less hooks.

John Deinstadi, a California Fish and Game Department biologist with long experience with catch-and-release fisheries, believes this is due to what he calls the ‘stiletto effect.’ Barb-less hook have the tendency to penetrate more deeply. Although mortality of released trout rapidly increases with warmer water temperatures (especially as temperatures approach 70 degrees), under normal conditions, almost all mortality of trout caught on flies or artificial lures is due to rupture of the respiratory filaments of the gills or puncture of the carotid artery in the roof of the mouth. Because of their greater penetration power, barb-less hooks are more prone to puncture the carotid artery. Large treble hooks often cause the least mortality because, unless the trout is quite large, the hooks cannot be engulfed into the mouth.”

 

http://tinyurl.com/99p94vz

 

From a TU newletter, the identical reference to Dr. Behnke and the Stiletto effect:

 

http://www.thamesvalleytu.org/newsletters/TVTUMay06.pdf

 

In summary, there is an abundant, if not overwhelming, amount of peer reviewed scientific evidence that barbless hooks play no part in fisheries management other than to appease the fishing public that wrongly believes barbless hooks help preserve fish populations. This has been tested in both fresh and salt water fisheries and is species independent.

 

The purpose of wildlife management is to preserve the population. It is not to restrict the fishing public's free choice when that restriction does nothing to preserve the wildlife.

 

The barbless option is a choice that should rightly be left to the angler. If you believe it preserves the fishery, it is your right to do so. But for those who do not, they should also have the right to use barbed hooks, unless the preponderance of evidence shows otherwise.

 

It is then up to those who believe that barbless hooks preserve fish populations to provide the scientific evidence to support that claim.

 

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The barbless option is a choice that should rightly be left to the angler. If you believe it preserves the fishery, it is your right to do so. But for those who do not, they should also have the right to use barbed hooks, unless the preponderance of evidence shows otherwise.

 

It is then up to those who believe that barbless hooks preserve fish populations to provide the scientific evidence to support that claim.

 

 

well, there you go again, totally disregarding the L****** tenet of holding emotion before facts.

 

Horror of horrors, I frequently spin-fish with crankbaits dangling two treble hooks. I find it much easier to remove those from a fish's mouth when barbless. That gives me more enjoyment because I can (at least in my mind) cause less injury to the fish and get the bait back in the water quicker. That, in turn, hopefully enables me to hook up more frequently over the course of my fishing. This type of "advantage" can't be quantified.

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