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Simplejack

How to keep tinsel from slipping?

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How to keep tinsel from slipping?

I always have this problem when using tinsel.. When I start my wraps, it always slips off the back of the fly when I start.. How do I prevent this?

When I see others tying flies in video, it always seems flawless and never any issues getting it to stick where it is suppose to when wrapping..

I even tried wrapping it tight and still no success.. Then when it looks like I have it, I start to lay down my wire and just the wire touching it makes the tinsel slip off the back..

Very irritating and I keep having to tear apart my fly and start over.. mad.gif

I tie the material down on the side or underneath the hook and still same results..

post-50719-0-75337200-1386993259_thumb.jpg

post-50719-0-38756700-1386993261_thumb.jpg

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Two thoughts -

 

First, the tinsel looks plenty wide for that fly. It can be done, but try a narrower size to make it easier.

 

Second, you have it way too loose. Put a lot more tension on the tinsel when wrapping it. Don't give it the slack to move.

 

Deeky

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Two thoughts -

 

First, the tinsel looks plenty wide for that fly. It can be done, but try a narrower size to make it easier.

 

Second, you have it way too loose. Put a lot more tension on the tinsel when wrapping it. Don't give it the slack to move.

 

Deeky

This looks to be the problem from my perspective as well.

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The chenille in Medium Ultra chenille so it's pretty dense. But, I will try making it tighter.

I thought I did it pretty tight, but I will try super tight and see what happens and post back with my results. Thank you smile.png

I'm new, so I'm still learning the simple things biggrin.png

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You could wrap once with the chenille behind the tinsel before wrapping it forward. This would allow your first wrap of the tinsel to already be withing the chenille, giving it nowhere to slip to.

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I prefer a round or oval type of wire-tinsel for ribbing. It seems you are using a flat type, which I use for tinsel bodies or flash back. Also when using wire-tinsel I often start with wrapping a tiny "tag" at the butt end of the body, then rib the body. I rib the body the using the opposite turn direction as for the body material. This will strengthen the body. I also try to rib with less distance closer to the butt, then widening the rib turns closer to the abdomen.

 

Mikechells tip about hiding the start of the rib is also a good choice.

 

Cheers,

Ulf

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Id be tempted to tie down the tinsel along the hookshank, over wrapping with chenille then you can rib it happy its secure. If you only want to tie in at the back id use Mikechells tip or oval wire instead.

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The problem is that the tinsel is trying to "climb" onto a fairly fat body. One solution is to make the first half wrap loosely, then trap it in place with your thumb nail. Apply lots of tension and make the rest of the wraps. Another way to do this that produces a very nice effect is to make the body of tinsel and rib over it with the chenille.

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To my eye this is a nicer solution than trying to wind the rib over such a fat body. Modern tinsels don't add much strength when used as a rib so overall it is probably a stronger fly as well. The chenille will protect the tinsel more than the tinsel protects the chenille.

Cheers,

C.

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If you don't want to modify the materials or look of the fly with the above suggestions, you can also hit the back of the tinsel with a brush of superglue before wrapping it. Give it a second to stick before going over it with your next material and it should stay in place for you.

 

I use this method when ribbing thin flat tinsel over floss bodies as it can slip later in the fly and ruin a nice tie too.

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You could wrap once with the chenille behind the tinsel before wrapping it forward. This would allow your first wrap of the tinsel to already be withing the chenille, giving i

^^^^

Agree with Mike & Deeky

 

Two thoughts -

 

First, the tinsel looks plenty wide for that fly. It can be done, but try a narrower size to make it easier.

 

Second, you have it way too loose. Put a lot more tension on the tinsel when wrapping it. Don't give it the slack to move.

 

Deeky

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Here's another vote for putting the first wrap of your body material (whatever it is) behind the tinsel, thus trapping it in place.

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You could wrap once with the chenille behind the tinsel before wrapping it forward. This would allow your first wrap of the tinsel to already be withing the chenille, giving it nowhere to slip to.

+1. Seems like the easiest solution to me. Plus it's what I do so it must be right. :)

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I just needed to wrap it tight. I was wrapping what I thought was very firm, but I needed to be wrapping tight tight. smile.png Thanks for everyone help.

Second attempt at the Matuka. Wire broke and I had to tie it back on at the rear of the hook and the collar got messed up. I think I need heavier wire.. Ultra wire small seems to be a little too fragile.

I will just tie it to some string and throw it in the river. smile.png

post-50719-0-44289600-1387180946_thumb.jpg

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If your wire is too small you could double it and twist it together as a temporary measure until you get wider wire. For short lengths I use a dubbing spinner to do this, longer lengths I put a cup hook into the chuck of a drill and use that. Two strands twisted is stronger that twice the strength of one strand. Look at the wires that are used in beading. A spool of UTC wire here is about £2:30 and contains about 12 yards. 0.3 mm beading wire is £0.90 and contains 100 yards. Its available in lots of colours.

 

There is also a cheat if you break the wire. Put a drop of CA glue on the hook behind the body. Start your wire like you would your thread over the glue. Make four or five turns towards the bend and then back over itself towards the body. It will look like you have a wire tag on the fly. Then form your wire rib as normal.


Cheers,

C.

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