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EzGoing

Best Starter Fly Tying Kit?

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Looking for a quality beginner fly tying kit for a gift for ~ <$75. Is there one you would recommend? Wapsi, Umpqua, others? Thanks.

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What riffleriversteelheader said. None of the kits are worth the money, because you pay the overhead for packaging and materials you might not use. Get a cheap vise, bobbin, scissors, whip finisher, thread, hooks, and ingredients for the Woolly Bugger and you are off to a reasonable start. YMMV.

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I started on a beginners tying kit that was given to me. The vice lasted about 2 months and maybe a dozen flies. But it got me started. That's all I can say for it.

 

My advice...buy a proper vice (it doesn't have to be an expensive one), a bobbin, some white thread, a whip finisher, and the materials you'll need to tie 3 or 4 different flies that interest you. If you like tying, and I bet you will, you'll be way ahead of the game. I've had to replace every tool that came in that starter kit because it was such junk. BTW it was purchased at Bass Pro...White River. Anything you buy will be better than what you get in a kit.

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I've been tying for for over 25 years. The kit would be for a brother I'm hoping will tie a little bit. I think a kit is the easiest way to get started with the basics since it's all inclusive.

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If you are teaching him, then start by deciding what you will be showing him and build a kit around that. I'm with the others on not liking kits. The Fly Dressers Guild do a kit here in the UK with Veniards. It is based on their fly tying course, so in doing the course you will use everything in the kit. This is the only one I know of that has been put together this way. The temptation for a retailer is to put what he can't sell into the kits to clear it out.

 

You probably have a lot of materials that you could make a kit up from. If you get some small grip seal bags you could even print up some labels for the materials. That would make the gift a bit special.

 

Cheers,

C.

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Since you have been tying for 23 years, you should have quite a stock of materials already. I know I do. I would suggest you get a good american made starter vise, a good set of scissors, a good ceramic bobbin, whip finish tool, hackle pliers and a hair stacking tool. Bodkins, bobbin threaders, and many other tools are optional, and can easily be made. Then add an assortment of materials from your own supplies. That way you can pick materials for flies that you know will be used.

 

If your going to be teaching your brother, then make a plan, and select materials for the flies you will be teaching him.

 

The Griffin Superior 1A is priced at $40.00, and the Cascade Crest #300 is priced at $38.95. Both are made in the US, and both have warranties. These will leave plenty of room for a quality set of tools, and some hooks, and thread.

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I didnt realize the Griffin was that inexpensive... I'll have to get one.

 

Ahem.

 

I echo what others have said; maybe get a good vise (A used Thompson model A can he had for 10-15 dollars, and I am still using the same one I bought 7 years ago - i just like it ) and then scissors, a good ceramic bobbin, and a bodkin - the 3 essential tools for me, anyway, plus a hair stacker. These can be gotten for, oh, 30 dollars, for good scissors and bobbin, and bodkin and stacker are 1-2 dollars each.

 

Get brown, olive, and cream or yellow thread, a dubbing dispenser, some tinsel, some wire, and some basic tying stuff for a few sorts of nymphs and soft hackles, though you can get poly harn and some microfibbets and do polywing ties, and elk hair/deer hair for comparaduns and EHC. I'd buy:

 

Pheasant tail feather bunch (Awesome for wet fly, flymph, emerger, nymph patterns)

Peacock eyes, 1 pk (Quill and herl bodies!)

2 or 3 packs of rabbit dubbing - use pheasant tail bits for tails and wing case on hare's ears - maybe tan, brown, and olive

2 or 3 packs of dry fly dubbing, or 1 of those multi color dispensers (I use one, i love it, it lasts a long, long time) in tan, brown, and olive

elk or deer hair, 1 pack of natural, 1 pack of bleached or light color - Many, many dries!

Maybe a pack of dyed mallard flank -> wood duck for wet flies and more variety for nymphs

some poly yarn in grey and white - Spinners and more variety for dries! See, no expensive hackles!

microfibbets (or paint brush bristles)

above mentioned threads and wire, tinsel

Sally hansen's clear nail polish

All this should be 20-30 dollars, depending on how you do your shopping.

 

Dave Hughes' "Essential Trout Flies". My no 1 recommendation for anyone wanting to tie, great fly selection, fishing tips, and good walkthroughs!

 

You should be able to tie quite a lot of stuff with this. I whip finish by hand and recommend everyone learn to do the same, but, whip finishers are cheap tools if you want one.

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Since you have been tying for 23 years, you should have quite a stock of materials already. I know I do. I would suggest you get a good american made starter vise, a good set of scissors, a good ceramic bobbin, whip finish tool, hackle pliers and a hair stacking tool. Bodkins, bobbin threaders, and many other tools are optional, and can easily be made. Then add an assortment of materials from your own supplies. That way you can pick materials for flies that you know will be used.

 

If your going to be teaching your brother, then make a plan, and select materials for the flies you will be teaching him.

 

The Griffin Superior 1A is priced at $40.00, and the Cascade Crest #300 is priced at $38.95. Both are made in the US, and both have warranties. These will leave plenty of room for a quality set of tools, and some hooks, and thread.

I agree with most everyone above. I bought one of those cheaper kits from Cabelas on clearance and still quickly replaced everything. Everything was very low quality. A friend of mine has the Griffin Superior 1A and really likes it. He has had it for a few years and it has held up great. Its a great vise to get started with and if you don't think you need anything fancy, it should last a lifetime Most people don't use or need the rotary feature you see on the more expensive vises.

See if you can find someone who hunts or knows someone who hunts. I just got 7 bucktails plus the grouse, duck, pheasant, and woodcock feathers from earlier in the year. Neighbors used to have peacocks and used to give me feathers when ever I needed any.

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I agree with Utyer- get 1 of those vices that he suggested and a Dr Slick tool kit; my wife got me a Dr Slick kit for my birthday - it was about $40 or $50. This may run you just over $75 but you will have quality set of tools and a quality vice.

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I bought a cheap kit a while back and am already planing to replace some things, I am sorry I didn't get a decent vise and just the tools I need. when you buy a kit then have to replace tools you are paying about the same as you would if you bought just the basics in a better quality. Never buy material in a kit, you always get material that you don't need. Just my opinion

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Not sure how you could get started with everything separate from hooks, basic mat'l and tools for the low price of a good kit. Wapsi has some great kits..

http://www.sportsmanswarehouse.com/sportsmans/Wapsi-Fly-Tying-Starter-Kit/productDetail/Fly-Tying-Tools/prod9999008928/cat101068

Any item associated with fly tying gonna cost $3, at least. It don't take long to really add up. I don't see how the kits can be that cheap, myself. You guys live in a vacuum?

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Not sure how you could get started with everything separate from hooks, basic mat'l and tools for the low price of a good kit. Wapsi has some great kits..

http://www.sportsmanswarehouse.com/sportsmans/Wapsi-Fly-Tying-Starter-Kit/productDetail/Fly-Tying-Tools/prod9999008928/cat101068

Any item associated with fly tying gonna cost $3, at least. It don't take long to really add up. I don't see how the kits can be that cheap, myself. You guys live in a vacuum?

You are absolutely right! And I think you know the answer to your question. There is no way to offer so much "stuff" for those prices. Doesn't that give you pause? The answer is obvious... In this day and age, I can't believe we are so naive as to believe that someone would give us something of value for less than its worth.

 

Let's face it, many of us started out on starter kits and we are still tying today. It wasn't enough to stop us from continuing the journey. BUT...the original poster asked for our opinions on this subject. Knowing what I know now, I would never have bought a starter kit. If you choose to use our gained knowledge, that is up to you.

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