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CristyK1

Bare Essentials needed to start tying

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My 13 year old son just fisnihed most of his Fly fishing merit badge class this past weekend (he wasn't able to catch any fish since the pond they were fishing in froze to the bottom during our freakishly cold winter). His favorite part was tying the fly and the cleaning and cooking parts.

Now he wants to tie his own flies. So I'm wondering what is the Bare Essentials needed to start tying

 

Thanks in advance.

Cristy

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CA79DWTK.jpg

Zephr Deluxe Fly Tying Tool Kit with Wood Case $59.00 ... free shipping

Just look up "fly tying kits". I did, and this is the first one on the list. This in from http://www.fishwest.net.

 

With a pack of hooks and some sewing thread and a few other items, he'll be ready to tie flies. Don't get too much, what materials you tie, and what kind of flies you tie are somewhat personal decisions, even for a young beginner.

Get him the tools, have him look at some patterns and SBSs (Step-By-Step) on the threads here ... then take him for a shopping trip for basic materials.

My vise is very similar to the one shown, and it's been working for me for over a decade.

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Cristy,

 

Mike started you with a good source to look into....

 

You did not mention what type of fish your son will be trying to catch....Trout? Panfish (bluegill, crappie, sunfish, etc)? Bass?

 

This will not alter the types of tools you need but will kind of determine what materials to use.

 

The bare necessities IMO are:

 

1. Vise - this holds the hook in place so that you can wrap the thread to attach the materials.

2. Hooks - this varies on what your son is going to fish for.

3. Thread - this attaches the material to the hook to create the fly.

4. Materials - the things that make the fly attractive to the fish.

5. Tools - Scissors for cutting materials...there are other tools like in the Kit Mike mentioned above and will serve him well for many years. The beauty of the types of kits Mike mentioned are that they have just about every tool your son would need for a LONG time!!!

 

There is a great book that you can find on Amazon.com for a few dollars that is the one I am learning with....

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/1878175130/ref=tmm_other_meta_binding_used_olp_sr?ie=UTF8&condition=used&sr=&qid=

 

I purchased this very book and absolutely LOVE IT! I got the spiral bound version so it lays flat on the table. You can get it for under ten dollars and it explains just about everything a new fly tyer could ever want. It also has lots of pictures and tips for tying. It goes over the tools, materials, hooks, etc....

 

Bass Pro Shops/Cabelas both have kits that come with all the tools/vise/materials that you can obtain as well.

 

There are also many good videos on YouTube discussing things for fly tying.

 

I am happy your son is getting into fly fishing! It took me 45 years to finally get into fly fishing (fished with lures and bait for 40 years) and I am envious of people getting into fly fishing at an early age!

 

As a former Boy Scout, I never considered the Fly Fishing Merit Badge....it may not have been a badge way back when but I salute your son for achieving the award!

 

Best wishes,

 

Mike :)

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Mike more than likely he will be fishing for trout. We live in SE. Michigan.

 

Thank you both for the advice. I know he loves his little Ant Fly and Wooly Bugger Fly he tied. He can't wait to do more.

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The vice, bobbin, scissors and materials are fundamental. The materials, encourage him to stick to a small set of flies to start with that the same materials can cover. That way he builds his knowledge and tying techniques without wanting to spend a fortune on feathers and fur.

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I tend to second COmike and Piker on this. I've bought kits before and they contained lots of tools that I have never even unpacked. Starting with the vise and bobbin, scissors, and whatever material you plan to actually use (hooks, hackle, chenille maybe, thread several colors, whatever). I got a whip finisher that I never use. Easier to use my fingers.

 

When he/she gets to the point where he/she feels the need for a particular tool, then buy that tool rather than a kit full of tools. Also be aware of the possibility of finding alternative materials, like floss from a sewing center, etc.

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Vise, bobbin, scissors, bodkin, thread, cheap fingernail polish, hooks, Materials vary depending on what he fishes for.

 

Stockard has vises for less than $20, bobbin $5, use mothers scissors, bodkin can be made by pushing a needle into a wood dowel, fingernail polish $1 at dollar store,

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I started with dollar store hooks, my moms sewing thread, a pair of rusty scissors and feathers from the chickens, in hand tying only for about six months

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Joman.... you remind me of the Woodwright Shop, where they use old hand tools to perpetuate history and tradition.. (LOL).

I would not go so far... I'm sure CristyK can afford a $20 vise and a bobbin. All the other tools can either be self-made or substituted with ordinary stuff from sewing centers.

My only admonition would be make sure the vise can be rotated without unlatching the hook.. (The Cabela Supreme is the one I have and it's $20). I also would predict it would be no time at all before the tyer would wish they had another bobbin or two.

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Christy,

 

Another thing to note.....he does NOT need the best and MOST EXPENSIVE stuff for tying flys.

 

I am on a budget as well and try to be frugal when I can.

 

Something you may want to consider when folks are talking about things is that you can find suitable substitutes at the craft store and Wally World.

 

I picked up some "Sally Hansens" hard as nails clear polish (?)....for two bucks and it does wonders for a substitute for head cement. You can also use chapstick for dubbing wax in a pinch. I have used saliva, water, and chapstick. These help for attaching materials to the thread.

 

After doing this (dubbing attachment) for a couple weeks I got some dubbing wax from a shop...well under three dollars and it works much better but your son can get by without this.

 

Just trying to keep things on a budget..

 

Mike :)

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I agree with COMike, Skip Morris's book, "Fly tying made clear and simple" is a great and very simple to understand. It was my first book as well. I would let him pick a fly he wants to start tying out of that book and go get the materials he needs for that fly. That was you ease into it...

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fly tying lessons

 

Another good idea. Of course with all the videos on youtube now, I'm sure that could serve s fly tying lessons. I bet Cheech could steer you to some good beginner tying videos of his.

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most fly tying videos just tie flies.

 

very few are geared for an absolute beginner.

 

very few actually teach techniques or even mention them

 

again, fly tying lessons

 

i'll post this again

 

This list of beginner tying materials is simply a list based on my 30+ years experience in fly tying. The list provided below is for a new tyer who wants to tie trout flies but can spill over to different genres of fly tying. It is a BASIC list. Could other items have appeared on the list? Of course they could but that's somebody elses list. Other tyers will add or subtract materials to their liking. So be it. Remember its a BASIC list of materials. It contains materials the can tie hundreds or even thousands of fly patterns.
This list is in no order of preference. This list is provided for your convenience and in no way requires you to buy all tying materials all at once or any materials for that matter. It is also a generic list of materials as I really don't have any preferences as to what brand of materials you buy.
Eventually you will need materials if you want to continue tying flies. The list may give you a head start as to what you might want to buy
Again, you do not have to buy the entire list all at once!
Buy what you want when you need it!
1. Hooks (in different styles and sizes)
2. Thread (6/0 to start in black & white)
3. Pheasant Tail (center feathers when possible for the longest fibers)
4. Peacock Herl (eye feathers and strung herl)
5. Marabou (blood quills are better)
6. Deer hair
7. Elk hair
8. Buck tail (in different colors like red, yellow, or white)
9. Lead or non-lead wire (in different sizes)
10. Ribbing wire (silver, copper & gold)
11. Rooster Hackle (grizzly, brown, white & dun) A good option is an introduction pack
12. Hen neck or saddle (grizzly, brown, dun etc) (great for soft hackle & wings)
13. Hungarian Partridge Skin (great for soft hackles)
14. Dubbing dispenser of hares ear (various colors)
15. Gray duck or goose wing feathers (used for wing cases)
16. Head cement
17. Tinsel and other flash materials (in assorted colors)
18. Calf tail (start with white, add colors when necessary)
19. Yarns & chenille (used for making bodies, both in assorted colors)
20. Floss (1 strand or 4 strand in assorted colors)
21. Strung hackle (practice wrapping hackle with this. cheap alternative to the pricey hackles)
another recommendation seen on most forums is to pick out 5-10 that you want to learn how to tie. buy the materials provided in the recipes of those flies. these materials are now the building blocks for tying different fly patterns in the future.
piker said this "The vice, bobbin, scissors and materials are fundamental."
for an absolute beginner, what more is really needed? those 4 items will tie hundreds of flies if not more. the kid got an introduction into fly tying but how long will he stay into it? he's 13 and girls and cars are in his future! smile.png

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Some of those books might be great... my problem with buying a book is that it might include lots of patterns, only a few of which would interest me (or whomever). There are a number of good web sites that have lots of good step by step photo/text instructions from which one can select only those he's interested in. Ward Bean has one such site. Anyone interested can PM me and I'll pass on my favorite URLs.

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