Jump to content
Fly Tying
MarineFlyFish

Dry Fly Floatant

Recommended Posts

That looks interesting. The first stuff was a two step process and some reported it left a matte finish. A good one step product might be the ticket. Checked the big box hardware internet sites and they are just showing the older product.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a video of a test of Neverwet as a fly floatant. The Neverwet in the video is a two-part aerosol. The version shown in Silver's post might be simpler to use. The last time I looked into this, it was quite expensive.

 

http://www.moldychum.com/home-old/2013/7/30/testing-neverwet-superhydrophobic-spray-as-a-dry-fly-fishing.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jay,

 

The video is interesting but is not a valid test of the Never Wet.

 

The reason is that the comparison floatant, was worked into the fly. So the dubbing absorbed the floatant.

 

The Never Dry was sprayed. The problem with spraying is that on the surface of the dubbing is treated and there is no guarantee that that all the dubbing completely absorbed the two part treatment.

 

Because of the two step treatment of the previous formulation of Never Dry, I did not think it would be a very practical fly floatant.

 

What happened in the submersion test is that the water penetrated the dubbing and was absorbed INTO the dubbing of the fly that was NOT TREATED. Submersion places the fly under water pressure so although the surface fibers that were treated repel the water, the untreated fibers absorb water and hold the water in the spaces between the dubbing fibers.

 

With the traditional gel floatant, the spaces between the dubbing were filled with the floatant and the floatation acted as a PHYSICAL BARRIER to penetration. Not so with the Never Dry that was used.

 

I have used the original version of Scotch Guard in the green can that contained a now banned perfluorooctane sulphonate chemical.The current red can version made since 2003 is not as effective IMHO. I sprayed it into a glass screw top container and then dipped the fly into the solution and put the fly onto a paper towels to dry. So the entire fly was submerged and treated.

 

With the new version of Never Wet this submersion treatment becomes possible and now I am intrigued. It may not work as a fly floatant but the one step treatment as a super hydrophobic liquid that a fly can be dipped into now makes fly treatment practical. The question now is whether it is effective.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whether the Neverwet fully saturated the dubbing or not, it still outperformed the traditional floatant in the test.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a lot of cdc on my flies. The combo I like is Frog's Fanny and Loon Lochsa. I also take the time to clean the slime off after each cast. Hemostats and slosh it through the water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know you're all going to hate me for this, so I'll apologize up up front for dragging this dead horse out, again, but I have another question.

 

First, I tried both, the "Naptha/wax dope" and the "Albolene". I think the Albolene lasted longer on the fly than the dope.

 

Anyway, my question is why do I have to melt the Albolene? Does it change the molecular structure of the product? Could I just use it as it comes out of the jar? Yeah, I know; that was three questions.

 

Thanks for putting up with me on this.

steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Anyway, my question is why do I have to melt the Albolene? Does it change the molecular structure of the product? Could I just use it as it comes out of the jar? Yeah, I know; that was three questions.

 

Thanks for putting up with me on this.

steve

 

 

Where is the post that says to melt Albolene?

 

Why? - To put it into a smaller container? Melt before applying to fly?

 

I think Albolene is a mineral oil-petroleum based compound that melts at skin temperature so melting it in hot water will not change it chemically.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Anyway, my question is why do I have to melt the Albolene? Does it change the molecular structure of the product? Could I just use it as it comes out of the jar? Yeah, I know; that was three questions.

 

Thanks for putting up with me on this.

steve

 

 

Where is the post that says to melt Albolene?

 

Why? - To put it into a smaller container? Melt before applying to fly?

 

I think Albolene is a mineral oil-petroleum based compound that melts at skin temperature so melting it in hot water will not change it chemically.

 

 

Uhhh, I know I read that somewhere, but for the life of me, I don't remember where. Obviously, it wasn't here. I may have just googled it.

Oh, well. You answered my question, and I thank you.

I promise I won't dredge this up, again.

 

Going back to sleep, now.

steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Way back at the first of this thread (June 1st), I posted this:

 

http://www.flyanglersonline.com/flytying/tyingtips/part49.php

 

It's about treating new flies with liquid silicone. No need for repeat treating. (according to the article). The thread has evolved into wax, wax and naphtha..... etc., and now back around to silicone. Still relevant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Virtually all the commercial fly floatants use silicone based siloxane/silanes = silicone oil as the water repellant ingredient. Siloxanes repel water better than wax or petroleum based hydrocarbon compounds. Even the powder floatants like Frog's Fanny are small particles of silicon dioxide coated with siloxane for water repellence.

 

Silanes and Siloxanes have a lower surface tension than chains of hydrocarbon and therefore can penetrate and coat more effectively. I use the 3M Scientific Anglers silicone based fly floatant or Tiemco Dry Magic silicone based floatant

 

Albolene is a mineral oil based product makeup remover and not as effective at repelling water as a product specifically made to repel water.

 

http://www.dowcorning.com/content/discover/discoverchem/si-repellents.aspx

http://www.gelest.com/goods/pdf/Library/advances/HydrophobicityHydrophilicityandSilanes.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, maybe some of the things I've used or use might be made out of diesel oil for all I know. Maybe Kerosene. I just know I am no knowingly, evaporation be damned, going to put crude oil products on anything I fish wish. This goes against everything I've been taught or read (except for here) and am not putting hydrocarbons in the water or in the air if I can avoid it, and especially not attached to something I'm fishing with. When I moved to the cities in MN several people told me that the best scent I could for walleyes in the Mississippi was WD40. No thanks. Might use the WD40 nymph but not sprayed with it's namesake in the oil field.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's going to be difficult to not put anything hydrocarbon based on anything anymore. Even alcohol is from petroleum. Also krazy glue etc etc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The reason folks heated the Albolene was so that they could get it into a small plastic squeeze bottle for convenient use streamside.

 

I use a plastic cosmetic container (see attach). Albolene will melt in the warm weather of summer and needs a container that won't leak it to your clothing.

 

To use Albolene all you have to do is get a small swipe on the end of your index finger and rub it between your thumb. It will liquefy and then it can be pulled through the fly parts. I have used it in extremely cold fishing conditions and never had a problem. Your body heat is what liquefies the gel like consistency.

 

Buy another type of floatant if you plan on using a lot of CDC flies. The dry shake stuff or something that is sprayed on for application.

 

004_zpsa8a1afa7.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hairwing,

 

Interesting. I seen this Albolene stuff around at my oldest daughters house and never though it could be used as a floatant. Is there a curing time after applied similar to watershed floatant? does it work applied to leaders also to help them float

 

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...