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petelangevin

What color dye do i need?

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flytire,

It never ceases to amaze me the lengths people go to answering peoples questions on this site.

Not one, but two color palettes. There are really great guys here.

 

NICE JOB!!! flytire

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flytire,

It never ceases to amaze me the lengths people go to answering peoples questions on this site.

Not one, but two color palettes. There are really great guys here.

 

NICE JOB!!! flytire

I can attest to that! There really are some nice folks on this forum. I have been helped several times since getting into tying by all the good people here.

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In the years I've been around this site & other fly tying sites, flytire's vast knowledge base & input on questions has always been some of the best! wink.png

 

Check here too, acid dyes:

http://www.dharmatrading.com/dyes/jacquard-acid-dyes.html?lnav=dyes.html

 

http://www.dharmatrading.com/dyes/dharma-acid-dyes.html?lnav=dyes.html

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Having done a fair bit of dying with acid dyes, and knowing that rit dyes are a conglomeration of a number of differenet dyes, i'd say avoid RIT dyes like the plague.

 

Also, the kool aid dying business is something i've avoided as well.

 

Acid dyes are not expensive, about $5 for a half ounce jar, which is enough for any dye projects you will have - unless you're going to be dyeing bucktails by the dozen, multiple times, the half ounce jar is sufficent.

 

I've dyed with Jacquard Acid dye in Olive, #634

 

I've dyed wool, from cream to olive, with no problems, also, dyed over a brown saddle.

THe process is simple, but for bucktail, i'd recommend heating the dye bath, inserting the bucktail, closing the lid and leaving it overnight in the bath (turn off the heat), before you come back to reheat it and fix the dye with either household vinegar (acetic acid) or citric acid powder - both are 'weak' acids and will pose no health threat.

 

IF you've any questions, shoot me a PM.

 

 

Wool dyed (jacquard) brown - top and olive - bottom

2012-12-08_17-01-49_802.jpg

 

Here's some other stuff i've dyed, all with acid dyes, from either Jacuqard, Cushings, or ProChem

 

Selction of materials to sunburst - a mix of yellow and a tiny bit of red - both Jacquard - notice how the bucktail piece in the middle (Top) didnt take the color so well. Hence why i recommend an over night steep in the dye bath. This was a quick 1 hour dye job.

2012-12-26_14-56-51_747.jpg

 

Magenta (prochem) - snowshoe foot and hackles

%255BUNSET%255D.jpg

 

Purple - hen cape (Jacquard)

20130810_201231.jpg

 

Two different shades of pink (Cushings) (hard to see) - whiting rooster saddle and hen cape

20131103_174422.jpg

 

Golden Pheasant crests - red (Jacquard) and watermelon (prochem)

20131201_091640.jpg

 

Hackle, Turkey tail - both sky blue (Cushings)

20131201_091800.jpg

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I agree with s fontinalis. You may or may not get good results with the rit dye. I've had poor results trying to dye things olive, dark brown, and black with the rit dye. Yellow, orange, and red seemed to work well with the few things I have dyed with the rit. I'm not sure but s fontinalis may be the same person who turned me on to the acid dyes on another forum( his post sounds very similar to the advice I was given a few months back). I bought the jacquards from dick Blick online in a few colors including olive and I have had much better results. I have not done any bucktail or deer hair though. But I did dye a half a grizzly cape olive a couple of weeks ago with the olive jacquard acid dye and it came out great. Whatever route you go make sure you test a small patch of the material you want to dye before you go throwing the whole thing in the dye bath. There is no going back once it is dyed.

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Buck tails can be a bugger to dye. Make sure to wash them real good to remove the grease/fat. I find soaking them in warm soapy water for an hour or so helps to clean them and helps with even dye uptake. Acid dyes are made for feathers and fur and are the best option as has been stated. Acid dyes also produce a stronger/brighter colour, Rite is more earthy/pastel in appearance.

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