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Randyflycaster

Using CDC as Soft Hackle Material?

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Hi Randy,

 

Quite the opposite, It will spread and move like no other material. Even in the stillest of water the fibres will move.

 

There is one great way to tie this kind of fly, really quick and simple. Start the thread run along the hook shank in touching turns. Catch in some ribbing wire (first photo). Catch in your CdC feather by the stem with a couple of loose turns (second photo), Draw the feather through the turns so that most of the fibres are captive, wind the thread back along the body in touching turns (third photo), Follow it with the feather then the rib. (No need to counter rib as the pitch is different) (fourth photo), tie off remove the excess and whip finish (fifth photo) . Body and hackle in one go. Here's a quick photo sequence of the tying.

post-43582-0-20319500-1406571122_thumb.jpgpost-43582-0-05700100-1406571140_thumb.jpgpost-43582-0-53026900-1406571154_thumb.jpgpost-43582-0-89958500-1406571167_thumb.jpgpost-43582-0-36524600-1406571195_thumb.jpg

 

You can also vary the tying to get other patterns. Here is the same thing on a curved shank hook. I've stroked the CdC fibres back and down as I wound the loose fibres, and added a spot of hare's ear dubbing at the head to finish it off. It makes a good swimming caddis pupa.

post-43582-0-35407500-1406571341_thumb.jpg

Your imagination is the only limit.

 

Cheers,

C.

 

Hope the edit makes it clear. rolleyes.gif

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Very interesting. I'm mot sure of one thing: When I wind the feather back toward the eye, won't I then have

barbs sticking out all along the body?

 

Thanks,

 

Randy

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Very interesting. I'm mot sure of one thing: When I wind the feather back toward the eye, won't I then have

barbs sticking out all along the body?

 

Thanks,

 

Randy

 

 

Tie the hackle in first right at the eye, hanging off the front, then tie your fly. At 'hackle time' you'll have it already tied in. this reduces bulk at the head and makes for a nice shaped collar. works just the same for CDC

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If you look at the photos you'll see I didn't! When you draw the feather through the loose wraps the fibres are then captive. You wind the captive fibres as the body, and the loose fibres as the hackle. Between the second and third photo the feather is pulled to the left, "drawn through". The only thing about this is estimating how much captive feather you need to form the right length of body. Usually about 2 - 2 1/2 times the length of the finished body you want. Less if you want a bushier hackle.

 

Cheers,

C.

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Hi Randy,

 

Quite the opposite, It will spread and move like no other material. Even in the stillest of water the fibres will move.

 

There is one great way to tie this kind of fly, really quick and simple. Start the thread run along the hook shank in touching turns. Catch in some ribbing wire (first photo). Catch in your CdC feather by the stem with a couple of loose turns (second photo), Draw the feather through the turns so that most of the fibres are captive, wind the thread back along the body in touching turns (third photo), Follow it with the feather then the rib. (No need to counter rib as the pitch is different) (fourth photo), tie off remove the excess and whip finish (fifth photo) . Body and hackle in one go. Here's a quick photo sequence of the tying.

attachicon.gifCdC Spider_0001.jpgattachicon.gifCdC Spider_0002.jpgattachicon.gifCdC Spider_0003.jpgattachicon.gifCdC Spider_0004.jpgattachicon.gifCdC Spider_0005.jpg

 

You can also vary the tying to get other patterns. Here is the same thing on a curved shank hook. I've stroked the CdC fibres back and down as I wound the loose fibres, and added a spot of hare's ear dubbing at the head to finish it off. It makes a good swimming caddis pupa.

attachicon.gifCdC Spider_0006.jpg

Your imagination is the only limit.

 

Cheers,

C.

 

Hope the edit makes it clear. rolleyes.gif

 

Just curious - do you prefer using CDC for soft hackle? I'm sure it depends on the fly but, overall does it perform better under water?

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NHmatt,

I think because of the natural oils in the CDC, it helps the fly to float in the middle of the water column, instead of sinking to the bottom. It also has better movement under the water.

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NHmatt,

I think because of the natural oils in the CDC, it helps the fly to float in the middle of the water column, instead of sinking to the bottom. It also has better movement under the water.

 

Gotcha. Thanks.

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NHmatt,

I think because of the natural oils in the CDC, it helps the fly to float in the middle of the water column, instead of sinking to the bottom. It also has better movement under the water.

 

Dyed CDC has no "oils" because they are washed off so the fibers can be dyed. Even natural colored commercial CDC is cleaned before it is sold to remove contaminants and to prevent the spread of avian diseases. After all, Cul de Canard is French for "Duck Bottom". So if you want true CDC with natural oils, puck your own and don't wash it.

 

CDC floats because of the fine fibers that trap air bubbles and not because of "oil" on the fibers. Air bubbles trapped in the fibers does give the sunken flies some buoyancy and reflectivity that some fly fishers do think it helps attract trout, especially during caddis hatches that have rising caddis pupa with air trapped under the pupal covering.

 

Hans Weilenmann, the inventor of the CDC and Elk is an expert on CDC. He wrote the first exhaustive article on CDC. The oil soaked natural CDC feathers are the type 3 "oiler puffs". These are not used to tie "soft hackle" type flies.

 

cdc-types-h-weilenmann-gff.jpg

 

http://globalflyfisher.com/tiebetter/tying-with-cdc/

 

"If it was solely the oil in the feather that makes it float, dyeing CDC would prevent the feather from floating, but this is not the case--provided the dye job keeps the feather's structure intact."

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Hans Weilenmann, the inventor of the CDC and Elk is an expert on CDC.

 

"

 

You mean, Birds didn't have CDC feather's, and Elk didn't exist, before Hans invented them???

 

Joking, of course.

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Silver creek,

Someone had told me that CDC's natural oils, even when dyed, helps it float. I had wondered about that at the time, but not seeing anything to the contrary, that is what I always thought.

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I use CDC on a lot of wet flies and nymphs, bead heads and non-bead heads. As Crackaig said, it moves like nothing else. I usually put some fibers in a split thread and wind them at the eye or right behind the bead just before finishing the fly. One of my favorites is a flashback bead head PT with a CDC collar.

 

Joe

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Silver creek,

Someone had told me that CDC's natural oils, even when dyed, helps it float. I had wondered about that at the time, but not seeing anything to the contrary, that is what I always thought.

 

 

Joe,

 

I've seen that published as well in early articles. This was later corrected by several authors as we learned more about the properties of CDC. I can understand how you came to your conclusion. No harm, no foul.

 

Here is another reference on cdc.

 

http://flyanglersonline.com/flytying/intermediate/part27.php

 

I did find this source that says CDC dyed in a cold process helps preserve the oils. So you may actually be correct that some brands contain some oil.

 

http://books.google.com/books?id=Moe9UglHq0MC&pg=PA72&lpg=PA72&dq=cdc+feather+oil&source=bl&ots=wb6JXELpGQ&sig=KBsWnpYEZyvZyrPZbUaYFZf26z0&hl=en&sa=X&ei=U4j7U8WXC4qAygSk0oG4CQ&ved=0CCQQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=cdc%20feather%20oil&f=false

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