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Mallard Flank Feathers

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I need some ideas, please. My friend gave me a bunch of mallard flank feathers and I need some ideas how they can be used besides as tails and legs. I tried the "Browse by Material" link, but it won't work for me.

Thanks

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Stayner ducktail. Dry fly wings, if small then they make a good hackle for the head of a wooly bugger.

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Bundled fiber wings on many dry flies. The overwing on a silver minnow or a zoo cougar.

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Feathers5

 

There is always the tried and true "Hornberg". Flank feather make great tent wing caddis. Then there is always the Spay Flies. If you search for "Fly patterns using mallard flank feather", I suspect you will find more than you want.

 

Good lock,

 

Michael

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Wrap as a hackle (google Knudsen Spider).

 

An extended body on a Mayfly (google Two Feather Fly or Hatchmaster).

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Dyed they are a wood duck substitute. Well if most people could dye the feathers they would have a wood duck. I saw someone use a light brown permanent marker to make beautiful wood duck wings. I was truly impressed.

 

Mallard makes a lot of lesser known smelt imitation streamers.

 

I use it in the gray/black and white form on my version of an Adams rather than use grizzly hackle tips for the wings.

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Used on some traditional wet fly patterns and also tied on alone or with other materials in small baitfish patterns. Also found as hackle on some spey flies often along with another feather as a compliment which gives the entire package a speckled look like you might see in a shrimp.

 

Sometimes the feather can have a fairly thick shaft so if using as a hackle strip one side and tie it in by the tip. Consider the curve of the feather and set it to the hook so that you can take advantage of this natural characteristic when you start your wrap. If you take the time to determine how it will wrap it will be to your advantage. Otherwise you can end up fighting the feather and not getting the finished product that you were hoping for.

 

Nice score! YOu will always find a use for these.

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