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Favorite streamer

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What is your favorite or go to streamer pattern? Im sure most people are going to say woolly bugger, muddler minnow, and clouser but im still interested to see what people say. I haven't fished streamers that much but from what i have fished ide say size 10 olive woolly bugger. Probably the most common streamers there is, but its for a good reason. It works amazing.

So what are your guys favorite streamers?

 

Thanks

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Depends on my mood I guess. You can tie a Clouser large or smaller and it can be used in a lot of situations; very versatile and popular. I see the Clouser and bugger in the same, generalist category and they occupy a lot of spaces in the fly box.

 

For larger, warm water species the Murdich Minnow is the first streamer I'll tie on, not a Clouser.

 

Bunny leeches and all their varieties have a special place in my heart for salmon runs.

 

I'd probably guess every salt water angler has deceivers in the rainbow of colors too.

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Depends on my mood I guess. You can tie a Clouser large or smaller and it can be used in a lot of situations; very versatile and popular. I see the Clouser and bugger in the same, generalist category and they occupy a lot of spaces in the fly box.

 

For larger, warm water species the Murdich Minnow is the first streamer I'll tie on, not a Clouser.

 

Bunny leeches and all their varieties have a special place in my heart for salmon runs.

 

I'd probably guess every salt water angler has deceivers in the rainbow of colors too.

 

I would have a difficult time picking a single favorite. There are many good ones these days.

 

ihang10 has summed up my favorites, but not for all the same usage. No salmon here to fish for with rabbit strip flies. I choose based on conditions, but always have these in my fly boxes.

 

Add the "Seaducer" or Hackle Streamer, whichever name you choose.

 

I've got quite a few bucktail streamers in my fly boxes as well.

 

I also like to go outside the box, and will try patterns not usually associated with species I chase, like using "Intruders" for bass. smile.png

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So far ... although I've been tying and trying some streamers for a couple of months now ... I haven't had much luck with streamers. I do like the looks of the sand eel imitations. This is the one fly I might buy UV cement for.

This is the type I mean ... credit an online photo, I don't know who.

 

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Not sure if this is science or good placement and believing in a fly. I do better with Thundercreek emerald shiner or blacknosed Dace or traditional streamers like a muddler variation, Edson Tiger or Black Ghost types over a wooly bugger that everyone seems to be fishing.

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I do agree with the clousers being great, but the sparser tied the better in my opinion.

 

Troutguy, generally I agree with you. They do seem to work better when tied sparse most of the time. However, if you believe in the theory of "matching the hatch", Clousers tied heavily dressed can be just as effective in some situations. On another site, a few years back another fellow posted some Clouser style flies that he ties specifically for targeting larger Striped Bass here in the Chesapeake when they make their spawning run to the upper bay in the spring. He stated he had not seen anyone else tying them as he did which went against the grain as far as Clousers go. Big & bulky

 

I also posted some flies I had originally tied for some guides who took trips to South America for trophy Peacock Bass, but had success with also here for larger Stripers. Both of us tied them large & bulky, (5/0 hooks) with the idea of producing a profile & movement that would interest those bigger Stripers. Somewhat matching the Herring or Shad that are also in the upper bay at that time. Plus, being of the Clouser style, the hook point rode up which of course aided in preventing snagging the bottom. In his case, he was fishing the "Flats" of the upper Chesapeake, which are fairly shallow, so the Clouser is an ideal style.

 

So, in some cases, it's not necessarily the best option to tie them sparse. These would likely work well for Pike or Muskie's too. smile.png

 

BTW, generally those who fish bucktail jigs regularly also state that they should be sparse, but many will agree that there's a time & place for more heavily dressed as well. Same concept, different application. wink.png

 

Here's a couple of those heavily dressed Clousers. All about 6"-8" in length. Time & place for all IMO!

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Tidewater I was totally focused on trout in my post. My blues and striper saltwater clousers are not sparse. I fish the striper runs with wide alewife patterns in South Carolina.

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Tidewater I was totally focused on trout in my post. My blues and striper saltwater clousers are not sparse. I fish the striper runs with wide alewife patterns in South Carolina.

 

Troutguy, thanks for clarifying that! Then we're on the same page! Since the OP didn't mention trout specifically, I didn't want him to get the impression that Clouser's for all applications need to be sparse. There has been much debate over that idea! sad.png

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Do streamers have to be large? If you can have a small streamer then the one I use most is for sea trout (sea run browns) on Loch Brora. Its a kind of Clouser but tied on a standard size 10 wet fly hook using white rabbit two fine strands of silver flash and small silver bead chain eyes. We have had so much success with this fly it is the automatic choice for the point fly when we fish Loch Brora. (My usual boat partner has problems with me writing about the good patterns. No problem giving this away as you will not find the sea trout on L. Brora. It took us 2 fishless seasons to locate them.)

 

Cheers,

C.

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C, I don't feel a streamer has to be large. It's simply a style. I've tied some Clouser style flies as small as a size 12 using fox & other finer textured fur, and thru the years have seen old standard patterns such as the Black Nose Dace or Mickey Finn in catalogs tied that small as well. In such a small size, they could also be called "wet flies", but IMO, they are both. There's certainly cross over between pattern types as far as what they might be called, and it doesn't really matter what they're called, as long as they produce! wink.png

 

The Woolly Bugger is the perfect example of a pattern that is both streamer & wet fly, so why not other flies as well? smile.png

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Brook trout...Mickey Finn or Royal Coachman Streamer. About all I ever used up north for brookies and bows and browns had no problem with it. Used it in size from as small as 16 2x Long to 8 2x Long.

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