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jerzfly732

first pheasant tail nymph

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I am a complete newby when it comes to tying. I bought my first vise, tools, and material last weekend at the tying show in somerset nj. Was just looking to get some inout on my first attempt at the pheasant taik nymph. Thanks in advance!

post-54458-0-30016500-1417504488_thumb.jpg

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Nice job, I am just an intermediate tyer myself. That will certainly catch fish.

When you catch your first fish on one, that's when you will be really hooked on tying.

 

Mike

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As we would say here, "Your having us on". I've seen much more experienced tiers produce flies that are not that good.

 

For a first attempt that is really very good. It does bear the hallmarks of a beginners fly, but they are not as extreme as most beginners make them.

Working through them in tying order,

 

The bead is an appropriate size for the fly, not overly large or too small.

The tails are on the long side, but not overly long. Nymphs have varying lengths of tail from tiny to about body length. Yours are in that range. Try making a few with the tail half the length of the abdomen. If you learn to make them that short you will have learned the control needed to make them any length.

The abdomen is nice and thin. The ribbing well spaced, putting on too many turns is a common problem beginners have, you haven't done that. It does look slightly uneven, but that will come with practice.

The thorax is a good size, I've tied more than a few nymphs and thorax size is something I still have to take care over. My tendency is to make them too short. Yours looks good. This is perhaps the hardest thing to get right, I certainly struggle with it.

The legs are like the tail, at the longer end of what I would consider the correct size range. I couldn't say they are too long. Like the tail, trying to make them shorter will teach you control.

Behind the bead the collar of thread is the right size. If the collar there is over half the size of the bead then it is too big. Yours isn't. It is purely a personal style thing, but I don't like that collar of thread behind the bead, so I hide it. However, some people like it, and make it a feature of the fly. Neither is "wrong", just a different style. You have done very well to keep the size of yours down.

 

Just for the exercise I've tied one similar, it will give you an idea what I was mentioning above.

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Now I am not saying that this is perfect. It is far from it, I wouldn't even say it is up to competition standard. Neither do yours have to look like this one. However, if you can tie one like this then you will have the control of the materials to tie one how you want it.

 

Learning fly tying is like an artist learning to paint. There are lots of technical details about the way paint works, and how to control it. Learning them enables your creativity. What I hope to do is enable you to get what you want on a hook, in just the same way an art teacher will enable you to paint what you want. So, and I'm sure I speak for many others here, ask any question you like. Ho and welcome to the addiction!

 

Overall it is a very good start... are you sure this is your first? wink.png

Cheers,

C.

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Thanks for the input guyys. It really is my first attempt at these though lol I bought the book "The Benchside Introduction To Fly Tying" yesterday and it is a great help to technigue. I took my time last night n followed step by step to makke this fthis one alone prob took me atleast a half hr to make. Lol. Again thanks for the input guys

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That is a pretty good start. Pay attention to what Crackaig says about improvements. Tying books are good, I have a lot of them, but there is no substitute for sitting down and tying flies. Lots of flies. Don't be afraid to substitute materials if you don't have exactly what a pattern calls for. This gets easier as you get more experience and it also keeps you from getting inundated in tying materials that you almost never use. Don't ask how I know that.

 

 

Steve

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