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Im in the progress of tying up a new batch of scuds and am in need of some opinions. Do you think that it is important/needed to have legs/antenna on the fly. Or just a body with shell back and ribbing.

If you do think legs/antenna are needed, do you think they need to be on both the front and the back of the fly or just one side? If i recall scuds swim backwards so i would guess it would be best to put the antenna at the back of the hook.Is this correct?

 

 

Thanks

 

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They are more realistic and therefore a more accurate representation with the antennae and legs. So I think your question should be: "Is it worth the effort to include them?" I suppose that is up to you.

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No. If fish are so smart that they will be counting minute legs and antennae, aren't they smart enough to see the giant steel hook ???

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Nice scuds....good detail.

Just hope the fish show their appreciation for such a great effort.

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....all good patterns above--especially denduke's

 

When alive they're mostly olive. The ones I've seen anyway. But a little orange and yellow usually shows through too. I have noticed, when they're panicked they swim amazingly quickly by curling up and flicking their tails. When not panicked they swim slowly from here to there by wafting their legs, with the length of the body stretched out into a dead straight line. Which is better to imitate? Curled up and fast or stretched out straight and slow?

_PIC2150_Scud.jpg

 

Green grocery bag (paper or plastic sir?) over phosphorescent green Wapsi Squirmy Wormy, dubbing and ribbing. Bit of lead on the shank too.

_PIC2373_Neon-scud-orange.jpg

 

When they die they turn all orange

_PIC2152_Dried-orange-scud.jpg

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In my experience antenna are not worth the trouble. The legs are represented by the picked out dubbing on the bottom.

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Those are Sculpinmaster's not mine....just quoted them here from the other topic.

 

Here's mine

169_0964.JPG

The two on the left are trout crack...

IMG_00831.JPG

Flies.jpg

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I don't mess with tails or antennae. They don't really seem important. I fish a lot of different scud patterns and almost always use curved hooks. My favorite pattern is a "pregnant" scud that incorporates an orange glass bead in the middle of the body. The wapsi sow-scud dubbing is great for making plucked legs, and I usually use a thick ziploc bag for the back, although some of my patterns use swiss straw, prismatic sheeting, and even foam.

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In what type of water do you guys fish scuds? Where do they get used mostly and would you name a few common locations in the west where they are important? Thanks challisman

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RE> "where to fish scuds"

 

I find the most scuds in cold clear waters with lots of weeds. Spring Creeks. Rivers below dams. Mid-altitude lakes (I live in the mountains). Even mountain freestone rivers like my local Gallatin have pockets of scuds, where ever the water slows without collecting silt. And where there are weeds.

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I cast a scud to my front drive and side walk

 

 

Oh, sorry, that's a sow bug.

 

I am not even sure we have scuds here in Central Florida. But I have tied some scud patterns, They work best when dropped in right next to weeds and allowed to sink to the bottom. Once there, they are either hit, or I pull it in and drop it right back in there. I believe the aquatic insects fall off vegetation just like terrestrials do in the air. They drop to the bottom and big 'Gills suck them up.

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Here's an aquatic Sow Bug. Entirely different critter with same name........as that sidewalk crawler above ;=))

These guys a more widely spread than the scuds I think. You find them almost everywhere. They range in size from almost microscopic to maybe 1/2" inch long.

 

_PIC4260_Sow-bug.jpg

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