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Fly Tying
Rooiwillie

Greetings from the dark continent

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When I hooked that one, I thought I had a big Bowfin. It didn't come up and jump, so I was pretty sure it wasn't a bass. I had to give it line several times as it ran. I would love to figure out how to target them all the time, not just the once in a while bite.

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I figured they fought well. They look a lot like an oscar, which is a cichlid that are abundant in south Florida. They fight really hard but never jump so you know its not an LMB when you hook one. I have seen them on lakes in central florida busting the surface, so I wonder if dry flies of some sort would work in those situations?

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imagine the fight from a four pounder snatch hooked in the side! Like pulling a sheet of plywood thru the water.

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Guys tilapia are NOT strictly hrebivorous. They are much like carp actually. They do eat a lot of plant matter, but also eat fish eggs, small fish, aquatic worms, aquatic insects, and crayfish. I've found all of these inside blue tillapia from Lake George on the St. John's river in FL. We bow fished them. Caught them on ratt-l-traps, crankbait a, rubber worms, soft plastic jerk baits, and various bluegill baits.

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Here are pics of the flies I mentioned earlier. These are not photos I took myself, I found them on the web. See my previous posts where I explain how I usually fish them. The legs on the stonefly I use is about 1/3 the length of the 1 showed in the pic, and also it's pitch black.

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i agree with fisherboy0301. tilapia are not strictly herbivorous, i live in south africa and i've caught hundreds of them on fly. In my opinion redbreast tilapia are the most aggressive, and fight super hard! one technique is to chum with bread, and then, once they're feeding, cast a bread fly or a large DDD or adams irresistible into the feeding area. a more "pure" technique is to find them and cast to a sighted fish. on a very hot day, they will often sit just below the surface of the water. any well presented fly will be taken. in the evenings they can be super fun on dry. however, the best way to catch them, and the most fun, is to target them on their beds in spring, twitch a large streamer over their bed and they'll attack viciously! try use a streamer that swims inverted, such as a small closer, to avoid snags. their beds will often be over rocky or sandy/muddy bottoms, the beds just look like large, dark circles on the bottom of the dam. my favourite flies are: slow sinking bread flies and adams irrisistables for the chum technique; white deaths, bloodworms and PTN's with long, micro rubber legs. (the PTN's work super well); para adams', small foam hoppers (#14) and small foam beetles work well in the evening rise; for bed fishing i like a small clouser or strip leech, in sunfish or bass colours.

 

Ive heard good things about berry flies but have never tried them, if none of the above conditions prevail, then blind fishing with a small woolly bugger or rubber leg PTN also works well.

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