Jump to content
Fly Tying
meyer2792

Woodworking Ideas

Recommended Posts

Reel seats are a great project for any woodworker. All you need is some hardwood scrap around 1"x1"x6" and a lathe or a jig for a drill lathe ( http://www.thegoodsurvivalist.com/how-to-make-a-diy-mini-lathe-out-of-a-power-drill/ ). You can get a lot of beautiful wood for reel seats from any custom hardwood supplier/mill, just ask to look through the scrap bin from the mill. I've got some beautiful birds eye maple and spalted maple that was cut from the ends of rough sawn lumber when they milled it for next to nothing. Turn out a few and get drilling the center out down and sell the seats on ebay, only real variable is matching the diameter and length to a particular set of hardware.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Portable fly tying desk, with the fold out doors and storage for everything you need to carry. Light enough to actually carry it, too.

I know it's been done before, but it's one of those items I dream of making one day.

 

i like this idea. maybe something based on a classic tool maker's chest.

 

http://www.chronos.ltd.uk/engineering-tools/2013/traditional-wooden-toolmakers-tool-chest-available-again-from-chronos/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, I like the octagon shape ... and drawer space would be at a maximum. Four sides with drawers and the shelves at the four corners, it would be really cool, I think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am going to attempt to make that octagon shaped drawer. This week we are suppose to have some nasty weather. So I should have enough time to start and finish it this week. As I am writing this and looking out the window I can barely see the trees in the front yard that are less than 25 yards away; got a blizzard happening outside. Also, I am going to look into make a reel seat. Anyone know instructions of doing it? Are you able to replace reel seats on factory made rods?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Short answer about replacing reel seats: yes.

 

Long answer: You can replace reel seats, but it can be a "reel" challenge. You don't want to damage a perfectly good rod, or the grip, and there is always a chance of this when replacing reel seats. First thing to consider is whether the reel seat is the end of the rod, or if there's a fighting grip. If it's the end of the rod its doable, if not I wouldn't bother because you will probably have to ruin the grip. Second thing is that they are generally installed from the tip, not the butt and getting them off the butt can be a challenge. Then getting the old adhesive to separate is one of the most difficult steps, since you never know what the adhesive is. If you can get the end cap off you may be able to figure out the adhesive. Usually there is masking tape under the reel seat which helps get a snug and straight fit. Sometimes giving it some heat with a heat gun will allow you to pull it right off.

 

If you're thinking about doing it, heat the reel seat while slowly turning the rod, if it pulls off go ahead and make your own, if not I'd leave it. You might have to buy new hardware (T.L. Johnson makes nice affordable aluminum hardware, 12-30 bucks on ebay), and custom fit the outer diameters to the hardware. The inner diameter should be a little bigger then the rod, and a little bigger in general since the whole reel seat has to fit over the butt. Clean the rod up with alcohol, give it a light scuffing with 220 sandpaper, clean it with alcohol again. Put masking tape on the rod slightly in from the ends of the reel seat so that it fits snug. I don't know how much it effects functionality, but it can be difficult to get the reel seat to be perfectly parallel with the rod, which looks a little funky. So try and line it up with the rod. Make sure that if you use new hardware it fits inside the cork grip which is usually bored out some and the front of the reel seat slides into the grip a little ways. Once everything is snug and lined up pick your adhesive and glue it on. I like the 2 part epoxies like devcon. Once the glue is set, tape up the hardware and some of the grip and finish the exposed wood, I like helmsman spar urethane for its weather resistance and discoloring resistance, two coats should be sufficient depending on the wood, oak or walnut or other porus wood I'd use four coats to make sure the capillaries are sealed. Don't use lacquer, it will get sticky and gummy and nasty eventually.

 

I replaced a bunch of reel seats and did some other work on some old bamboo rods that I got at an estate sale. The glue on those was old and dried up and they came off easily, but on a newer glass or graphite rod they come off a lot harder. All this typing makes it seem difficult but it's really not too bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...