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Balancing flies

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For you stillwater guys who have tried tying balanced flies which style to you like to use-

 

Add length/weight beyond the eye of the hook with a pin and bead or like this:

 

shown in this video

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=S_6sn7ooL80

 

 

or create a new eye using wire leader or mono loop to replace the eye like this

http://www.flippr.ca/bob/TYGerLeader.pdf

 

 

BTW the video shows a nice use of simi seal

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Is this for ice fishing? I understand a balanced lure for vertical jigging and ice fishing, but in both of those, usually, you're going to depths that neither of those light flies would easily get to.

Do you fishing these under a bobber to allow a vertical jigging technique after casting?

Hmmm ... I think I just answered the question ...

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First method. I tie a ton of balanced flies for my stillwater fishing. Mostly leeches but also damsels, dragons and baitfish. I tend to create the pin extension on hooks a doz or two at a time so that I have them handy. Best to use a tungsten bead to achieve the balance but you can also use a regular bead and then a silver lined red or orange glass bead behind a reg brass bead. The two beads will balance as well as a single tungsten and give you a little bit of flash.

 

Cheers

 

J

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The new eye mane behind the existing hook eye, could enter-fear with the hook gap. The bead extended on a pin is (IMO) the better option. With the bead on a pin, you don't need a counter drilled bead, just a single hole size would slide on the pin. You can use cheaper beads for this type of a weighting system.

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Pins on jig hooks is my prefer style. The 2nd option you presented does not seem to offer any added advantage although it is a clever idea. You can use pins on normal hooks as well, but it makes the eye harder to get at when tying on the leader, and that would be my problem with the wire method, along with the concern that the wire might slip.

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I have only used the pin and bead method. I suppose with the added eye you could fish the same fly either balanced or in a traditional manner.

 

 

Is this for ice fishing? I understand a balanced lure for vertical jigging and ice fishing, but in both of those, usually, you're going to depths that neither of those light flies would easily get to.

Do you fishing these under a bobber to allow a vertical jigging technique after casting?

Hmmm ... I think I just answered the question ...

 

These are fished under an indicator. The fly is then in a horizontal position. Surface chop can provide some action while the fly remains horizontal.

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First method (Phil Rowley).

When the pin is first wrapped in with somewhat loose wraps,

one can adjust it back and forth a tad for balancing.

 

Second method seems to move the tippet too close

to the hook point for my comfort.

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I agree with HJ that this seems to cut the hook gap down considerably, however, the author seems to not have found it a problem and has the pics and fish to prove it. It's something I might have to give a try to. Spring crappie like a hanging, barely moving jig over one retrieved in normal fashion.

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