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portlyjoe

cdc feathers

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Hey guys i know this may seem a bit noobish, but where on the fowl are cdc feathers? I have been plucking pheasants for the past week ( I hit a turkey and two Pheasants( one male one female) in two weeks) .

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Thanks Silver, i know alot of duck hunters so this fall i will trade "breasting" birds for their cdc.

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Almost all birds have that gland (the uropygial gland or preen gland). It produces the oil that they use to preen and waterproof their feathers. Not all of them have the same type of feathers around it that gland that waterbirds do. Their waterproofing requirements are more stringent than land birds.

 

Steve

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Thanks Silver, i know alot of duck hunters so this fall i will trade "breasting" birds for their cdc.

 

 

You may not be familiar with Hans Weilenmann's article on CDC. He has a section on harvesting CDC as well as the feather types.

 

http://globalflyfisher.com/tiebetter/tying-with-cdc/

 

To quote Hans;

 

Harvesting CDC

 

"The best quality CDC comes straight off the bird. The harvesting process is simple and swift and the average mature bird provides between 70 and 100 usable feathers.

 

Once you lift the cover feathers, you can easily locate the preen gland by feel as well as sight. The visible part of the gland shows up like a shiny pebble protruding from the surrounding skin and is capped by a clump of feather puffs (Type 3 feathers, or oiler puffs) saturated with oil. On the illustration these feathers are shaded darker and are just below the thumbnail. The larger feathers surround the gland and increase in size as they get farther away from the center. On a mature mallard the stem on the longest feathers that still retain the CDC structure may be close to 2 inches long. On a goose they may exceed 3 inches.

For those who hunt or have friends that hunt ducks, or for those interested in where the CDC feathers are located on the bird, this drawing depicts the exact location of the CDC feathers.

 

Store the saturated oiler puffs with the rest of the feathers and in a few days the oil will have dispersed evenly across the feathers, leaving the oiler puffs fluffy.

 

Fresh CDC feathers are mostly free from vermin, but to be safe put the container with feathers in the freezer for a couple days to kill any mature bugs. This may leave some eggs intact, so remove the container from the freezer for a day or two to allow any surviving eggs to hatch, then put it back into the freezer for a couple days to finish the process."

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